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What you are feeling is normal. Any time you do a new exercise, or even an old exercise in a new way, you will be pushing your muscles past the point where they are comfortable and making them sore. For the most part, this is lumped into the term Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). For some people, the presence of DOMS becomes a goal or a indication of a ...


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I'd highly recommend seeing a local Physical Therapist. A full evaluation is required to properly diagnosis and plan a corrective exercise regimen based on your unique situation. I've included information below that provides an overview of typical patterns seen that are similar to what you're describing. Postural and Neuromuscular Dysfunctions When ...


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I primarily agree with Sparafusile. DOMS is pretty normal, especially for those impulse exercise sessions where you haven't warmed up, or haven't done the exercise before. Over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatories such as aspirin or ibuprofen combined with heating pads or hot baths will give you enough relief to be able to sleep. For steps, as ...


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The barbell hip thrust is legitimately an amazing exercise for the glutes. I highly recommend you look into that, and try to get accustomed to it. As for hamstrings, one of my favorite exercises is the Romanian Deadlift, but since you disqualified it, another good option is the Physio Ball Leg Curl. A good demonstration can be seen here. It allows for some ...


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I've performed natural glute ham raises as a substitute. They're like GHRs but with a fall/push-up at the end. When I first did them I had a partner holding my ankles but after that, I also had to get creative. I placed the barbell on the inside of the lowest power rack height setting. This places the barbell somewhere > 6" off the ground and then I loaded ...


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This issue is pretty close to my heart, as I once had some minor back pain which was caused namely by tight hamstrings. And I felt the same way you do, that the straight leg, lean forward stretch wasn't cutting it. Static stretches Static stretches is something you usually do after the workout because as you perform contraction after contraction during ...


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OP: the hamstring doesn't just bend the knee. That's the function at the knee insertion. However, the hamstring ALSO acts as a hip extensor along with the glute maximus. Hence why RDL/Straight-Leg Deadlifts, Good mornings, etc involving a hip hinge with straight-ish legs works to isolate them well. The reason a squat uses the hamstrings is because in ...


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Romanian deadlifts and good mornings are both hinge patterns, however there are some major differences. Such as the lever action in relation to where the load is placed. A true good morning is a posteriorly top loaded hip hinge. The difference being the loading vector and range of motion. The good morning is what is called a class three lever (Romanian ...


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I wouldn't say that cycling is "bad" for your health. There's solid research that cycling can fix a bum knee, as an example: It is suggested that cycling might be a useful exercise in the rehabilitation of patients with injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament of the knee or achilles tendon. And just to ground everyone ...


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There are several things you can do, just know that in a raw squat (no squat suit or compression briefs) the glute involvement is primarily at the bottom, and the hamstrings are only moderately used. With a squat suit, the leverages change and loading the hamstrings is more important. That said, the glute and hamstring activity is still important--...


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You can't tell, and, nor can we. Only a trained professional can advise you on the extent of the trauma to the muscle. Having said that, you should let your pain level guide you to amount and extent of the activity as you ease back into it. Ideally you would have progressed through some sort of rehab program to strengthen the injured area.


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Cycling has been shown to shorten the rectus femoris. This happens because its range of motion is smaller than in for example running. The same thing happens to any muscle that is used across a shorter range of motion, so I presume that the exact same thing happens to the hamstring. There is another factor that plays a role there as well. The hamstring has ...


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I know that my most frequent running injury was my right hip. Never had a problem with my left side at all. I think you usually end up injuring one side early in life, then compensate or lose flexibility somehow, then start developing imbalances. I'm a huge barbell fan, but bodyweight single-left stuff is awesome for identifying imbalances. I would imagine ...


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The best stretch I've found for the posterior chain (touching your toes) is a dynamic stretch called the flexibility rollover or half reverse roll. It's fun and really gets you deep into the stretch. You'll be able to touch your toes in no time. Here's a video of the stretch in action (another video here). Starting position: Ending position:


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You are correct that they are the same action other than the bar placement. Both exercises place a high degree of emphasis on your posterior chain -- the group of muscles comprising your hamstrings, glutes, adductors and lower back. You also need a strong midsection and core to maintain your lower back arch and to stop yourself from rounding over. ...


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Honestly, there really is not a master flexibility course. It's whatever stretches you need to do for your particular problem. Stretch after your workout, when the muscles are warm, instead of at the beginning (when you just want to be warming up). Stretch to the point of mild discomfort (not pain), hold it about ten seconds, ease back to 90%, and then pulse ...


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Actually, deadlifts do have a unilateral equivalent: the one legged deadlift, usually done with a Kettlebell. If you google it, you'll get a bunch of pictures. At my gym, it is a common exercise, ladies mostly are doing it. I myself just started practicing it a week ago. However, this is a very, very difficult exercise to do properly. There is a huge ...


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There's just entirely different exercises, honestly. The only similarity is that you're contracting the biceps femoris. Compare the muscles used for the GHR vs the leg curl, you'll see the difference. It's also built into the name, the GHR is the glute-ham-raise, and the glute portion there is key. The leg curl is, well, just a leg curl. I'm really not ...


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These issues might be related to the each other because your hamstrings and glutes work together in many movements and they are the main muscles (along with quads) that make hip / leg movement possible. So there might be a connection there. I am unable to fully straighten my legs ( lack of hamstring flexibility? ) Yes, this seems to be a hamstring ...


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Similarly to yourself I can't get anywhere near my toes when in a forward bend, and I have tight hamstrings etc. YMMV of course but personally I've found Yoga helpful in this regard (I specifically practice Hatha) - there are multiple poses that help stretch the hamstrings, hip flexors and other muscles that will be effecting your flexibility. Poses such ...


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Hamstrings are only part of long structure. Issue can be higher, or lower, or all together. Look for "superficial back line, Myers". As a prove - roll your feet - like here. Lacrosse ball is perfect for that. Then try if it help in your motion range. Most of us can do dead lift, squat easier. Had same problem, and decide to stretch / mobilize - for two ...


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I would tend to agree with the advice given by your PT to concentrate on stationary bike. While it does primarily work the quads, you do get some hamstring work. However, if you feel that you can safely perform body weight movements, you should consider using a resistance band. Using one will allow you to perform Lying Hamstring Curls. Additionally, if ...


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It's probably bad form to just post a link as an answer, but honestly I don't think anyone could explain this better than Paul Ingraham on his blog PainScience, with the references and studies to back everything up: https://www.painscience.com/articles/posture.php and https://www.painscience.com/articles/structuralism.php Regarding braces (this is about ...


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The Romanian deadlift is basically the definition of what you're looking for: loading the hamstrings (and glutes, and spinal erectors) anywhere from lightly to substantially but sub-maximally.


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I've had my foot slide out from under me due to the floor being too dusty. I train in a garage, so that's always a concern. I've also had the hamstring pull due to factors other than what's immediately obvious. In your case, a good part of it was probably due to the foot slipping and suddenly loosing tightness on one side. Paul Carter has a great article ...


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If you're really tight, the lying knee to knee stretch will get felt in your hamstrings as well. So if you need more flexibility in that area, you'll get it, although it's not really a "hamstring stretch" in the purest sense. I answered a similar question a few weeks ago, and would recommend reading that one as well, particularly the single leg deadlift ...


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There are two differences with the hamstring curl. To target the two hamstring groups separately (the lateral biceps femoris or the medial semitendinosus and semimembranosus) you don't vary the width of your feet, but the angle of your feet. If you want to engage the biceps femoris more, then angle your feet outward, while keeping the legs parallel. If ...


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Soccer is a fairly injury prone sport. It's great that people are playing sports, but I've seen studies suggesting that it's the most injury producing of team sports, beyond even tackle football. Looking at Australia, here are some metrics being reported: The rate of injury for football players is up to 35 injuries per 1,000 playing hours. That's more ...


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I had a huge growth spurt in high school and my muscles never lengthened out. Trying to touch my toes with straight knees and back led to excruciating pain around the back of the knee and upper calves. The way I got through my stiffness problems was actually with several support stretches. Once I had loosened the muscles connected to my hamstrings, I got ...


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Honestly, the best training for touching your toes is just doing it. Stand with your legs straight (although not with your knees bent inwards) and lower yourself as far as you can. Then, stay in that position for a few seconds, try to relax and stretch just a little bit further. When coming back up, again, do it slowly (the general advice people call out is ...


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