16

The more flexible you are doesnt always mean you are less likely to injure yourself... sometimes being too flexible is a detriment and your strength is lacking. If you are extremely flexible but lack the strength to maintain certain exercises you are equally as prone to injury as someone who is inflexible. The key is determining where your body lacks ...


14

There are actually quite a few studies that address this question. If you search on google scholar for musculoskeletal fitness and health, you'll find a lot of good reading. In a summation of them, there are basically three components to musculoskeletal fitness, which are strength (ability to perform work), endurance (how long you can do said work) and ...


7

Here is another 'strange' person for you. I have been slender all of my life and I still am. However, I have never really been able to touch my toes, and one gym teacher in middle school gave me an "F" in gym one semester because I couldn't - even after lots of stretching exercises, the best I could do was BARELY touch the floor with my middle fingers. ...


6

What you are feeling is normal. Any time you do a new exercise, or even an old exercise in a new way, you will be pushing your muscles past the point where they are comfortable and making them sore. For the most part, this is lumped into the term Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). For some people, the presence of DOMS becomes a goal or a indication of a ...


5

Freakyuser, It might not be your hamstring muscle. If you can touch the floor with your knuckles without bending the knees, then it is most likely not your hamstring. Also, this is beyond average (most people can't do this). You might want to check and see if your lumbar spine is the problem of your stiffness. However, you can read the Functional ...


4

So they're just sore? Intervals hurt - that's the point - you want to be a bit sore because that's your body getting stronger. Stretching's probably not going to help much. The intervals are doing a small amount of damage to your body so that it can then repair itself and a bit more and become stronger. You need to rest and eat sufficient protein to help ...


4

I primarily agree with Sparafusile. DOMS is pretty normal, especially for those impulse exercise sessions where you haven't warmed up, or haven't done the exercise before. Over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatories such as aspirin or ibuprofen combined with heating pads or hot baths will give you enough relief to be able to sleep. For steps, as ...


4

I'd highly recommend seeing a local Physical Therapist. A full evaluation is required to properly diagnosis and plan a corrective exercise regimen based on your unique situation. I've included information below that provides an overview of typical patterns seen that are similar to what you're describing. Postural and Neuromuscular Dysfunctions When ...


3

There are several things you can do, just know that in a raw squat (no squat suit or compression briefs) the glute involvement is primarily at the bottom, and the hamstrings are only moderately used. With a squat suit, the leverages change and loading the hamstrings is more important. That said, the glute and hamstring activity is still important--...


3

This issue is pretty close to my heart, as I once had some minor back pain which was caused namely by tight hamstrings. And I felt the same way you do, that the straight leg, lean forward stretch wasn't cutting it. Static stretches Static stretches is something you usually do after the workout because as you perform contraction after contraction during ...


3

It appears you are flexible enough and your hamstrings don't need additional stretching. I would focus on strengthening your hamstrings instead of stretching. Add deadlifts or other hamstring exercises you prefer to your fitness routine at the gym. Too much flexibility can be a cause of injury.


3

OP: the hamstring doesn't just bend the knee. That's the function at the knee insertion. However, the hamstring ALSO acts as a hip extensor along with the glute maximus. Hence why RDL/Straight-Leg Deadlifts, Good mornings, etc involving a hip hinge with straight-ish legs works to isolate them well. The reason a squat uses the hamstrings is because in ...


3

I wouldn't say that cycling is "bad" for your health. There's solid research that cycling can fix a bum knee, as an example: It is suggested that cycling might be a useful exercise in the rehabilitation of patients with injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament of the knee or achilles tendon. And just to ground everyone ...


3

Romanian deadlifts and good mornings are both hinge patterns, however there are some major differences. Such as the lever action in relation to where the load is placed. A true good morning is a posteriorly top loaded hip hinge. The difference being the loading vector and range of motion. The good morning is what is called a class three lever (Romanian ...


2

I can touch my toes. I can put the palm of my hands on the floor even with my knees straight if I want to. I guess it's simply how you're built, because I haven't stretched in months and I can do it. I have long legs, but I s'pose my arms must be long too haha! You also have to give me the fact that I'm young- around 16- and female. Women are often more ...


2

Hamstring strengthening is very important to prevent knee injuries in addition to improve your performance, especially in sports that require lots of kicking, jumping, cutting, sprinting, acceleration and deceleration. If you can find a stability ball, then you can try these exercises: Stability Ball Hamstring Curl Stability Ball Single Leg Hamstring Curl ...


2

If you round your back when bending over and touching the ground, you're taking the hamstrings out of the equation. Try keeping a flat back and hinging forward at the waist.


2

You can't tell, and, nor can we. Only a trained professional can advise you on the extent of the trauma to the muscle. Having said that, you should let your pain level guide you to amount and extent of the activity as you ease back into it. Ideally you would have progressed through some sort of rehab program to strengthen the injured area.


2

Cycling has been shown to shorten the rectus femoris. This happens because its range of motion is smaller than in for example running. The same thing happens to any muscle that is used across a shorter range of motion, so I presume that the exact same thing happens to the hamstring. There is another factor that plays a role there as well. The hamstring has ...


2

I know that my most frequent running injury was my right hip. Never had a problem with my left side at all. I think you usually end up injuring one side early in life, then compensate or lose flexibility somehow, then start developing imbalances. I'm a huge barbell fan, but bodyweight single-left stuff is awesome for identifying imbalances. I would imagine ...


2

The best stretch I've found for the posterior chain (touching your toes) is a dynamic stretch called the flexibility rollover or half reverse roll. It's fun and really gets you deep into the stretch. You'll be able to touch your toes in no time. Here's a video of the stretch in action (another video here). Starting position: Ending position:


2

You are correct that they are the same action other than the bar placement. Both exercises place a high degree of emphasis on your posterior chain -- the group of muscles comprising your hamstrings, glutes, adductors and lower back. You also need a strong midsection and core to maintain your lower back arch and to stop yourself from rounding over. ...


2

There's just entirely different exercises, honestly. The only similarity is that you're contracting the biceps femoris. Compare the muscles used for the GHR vs the leg curl, you'll see the difference. It's also built into the name, the GHR is the glute-ham-raise, and the glute portion there is key. The leg curl is, well, just a leg curl. I'm really not ...


2

Actually, deadlifts do have a unilateral equivalent: the one legged deadlift, usually done with a Kettlebell. If you google it, you'll get a bunch of pictures. At my gym, it is a common exercise, ladies mostly are doing it. I myself just started practicing it a week ago. However, this is a very, very difficult exercise to do properly. There is a huge ...


2

Honestly, there really is not a master flexibility course. It's whatever stretches you need to do for your particular problem. Stretch after your workout, when the muscles are warm, instead of at the beginning (when you just want to be warming up). Stretch to the point of mild discomfort (not pain), hold it about ten seconds, ease back to 90%, and then pulse ...


1

The Romanian deadlift is basically the definition of what you're looking for: loading the hamstrings (and glutes, and spinal erectors) anywhere from lightly to substantially but sub-maximally.


1

How sharp is the pain? If we are talking about a dull feeling of pressure in the lower lumbar pressure that is quite uncomfortable then we are probably talking about back pump. Any muscle can get a pump, and after 20 rep sets it's pretty much a given. However, if the pain is sharp, then we might be looking at a strain or tear. Dealing with Back Pump ...


1

I've had my foot slide out from under me due to the floor being too dusty. I train in a garage, so that's always a concern. I've also had the hamstring pull due to factors other than what's immediately obvious. In your case, a good part of it was probably due to the foot slipping and suddenly loosing tightness on one side. Paul Carter has a great article ...


1

If you're really tight, the lying knee to knee stretch will get felt in your hamstrings as well. So if you need more flexibility in that area, you'll get it, although it's not really a "hamstring stretch" in the purest sense. I answered a similar question a few weeks ago, and would recommend reading that one as well, particularly the single leg deadlift ...


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