Hot answers tagged

6

Ah, the powerball. I had forgotten these existed after I broke mine. A powerball is indeed a workout tool, but it has an extremely limited effect. It can help with strengthening grip by engaging forearm muscles, but depending on how you "swing" it, you can get some upper arm and shoulder work into it. Forearms To train forearm and grip, have a constant 90 ...


5

One sided or Unilateral Farmer Carries are actually a fantastic exercise. Since carrying the weight on one side causes a lateral flexion (side-bending) and rotational forces. To prevent yourself from literally falling over, these forces must be neutralized -- by utilizing smaller stabilizing musculature. In contrast, during a Standard Farmers Carry you ...


4

You were likely taught to cup you hand in some beginner class. That's not so much "wrong," just ineffective & unnatural. It also doesn't add to your propulsive power as you may think. The cup has proven to not add any difference in propulsive power through enough studies. It also forces you to focus on a minor matter that actually adds unnecessary ...


4

That 'outwards' sort of grip is commonly referred to as 'suicide grip' for obvious reasons. While it may not be dangerous on many exercises, on the Bench Press for example it can be very harmful (even deadly, hence the name) to use it. With this grip it is way easier/more likey that the bar just slips out of your hands crushing the whole weight onto your ...


3

Grip strength is very important for a large number of reasons, so first of all, kudos for identifying the problem. Common mistake One of the reasons, as you point out, is that poor grip strength will limit the number of reps you can do, which short-changes your primary mover for that exercise. The most common mistake is to start using straps in order to ...


3

Back in the 1970's, the theory was to hold your fingers together. Then people started applying engineering and science to sports. One of the early investigations was of Dara Torres, involving the hand shape that she used. She had ignored the prevailing theory, and swam with a 'relaxed' hand shape, with the fingers apart. And she was good (spectacularly so). ...


3

So you either have weak grip or your hands are actually physically slipping. Both very fixable issues, so don't be discouraged! If it is ACTUAL slipping, then there's a few things you can do. First, flour doesn't work NEARLY as well as just pure chalk. You know the stuff that olympic lifters use? You can get some at any supplement store or sports store for ...


2

My yoga instructor told me to fold my fingers over my hand with the four fingers reaching towards my wrist and my thumb goes up against the side of my pointer finger so the pad of my thumb is flat with the topside of my knuckles. This provides stability in the wristt and no injury to the fingers or nails. I sprained my wrist really bad 6 months ago and have ...


2

I did different martial arts and as part of the warm up routine we would always do hand/wrist stretching. As it would be a bit difficult to explain them via words, I looked for some videos and found this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6nS7F8ospQ and several recommended ones on the side of youtube They explain the stretches in a nice and understanding ...


2

I suggests grip training (crushing, gripping, pinching ...), forearm training, climbing and hard physical labor. Some scientific researches have found that competitive climbers hands have thicker and denser bones, muscles and tendons. That is due to the body adaptation to externals stimuli. In the same way woodworkers, lumberjacks, smiths and many hard ...


2

It's fine. Something like the Captain of Crush grippers are made of metal, with a knurling like texture to the handles to increase friction (in a pinch I've used the knurling on them to file bits off a callus, that's how rough they are). The abrasions might be causes by sharp bits of plastic that was hidden under the foam, just file them off or cut them off ...


2

When you do a pull-up with your palms facing each other you are using a neutral grip. The standard pull-up is done with a pronated grip. When you change the orientation of your fist you alter, slightly, which muscle groups get worked more. My understanding is that a neutral grip will work you forearm more and a pull-up ultimately works you lats much harder. ...


1

You don't state the make of your 150lb gripper, but that is comparable to a Captains of Crush #1 gripper. At most you should progress to a #2 which is 195lb - I can tell you that the difference is very significant (they also offer a #1.5 which is 167.5lb). 300lbs would be more than the CoC #3, and that is a huge jump! By the way, the IronMind site that I ...


1

Larger hands will naturally produce stronger forearms. Because many muscles in the forearms are connected to the hands and fingers, larger hands will inevitably lend themselves to larger forearms, and a larger muscle will almost always be a stronger muscle. Genetics are just a luck of the draw, but luckily they aren't the only thing that determines our ...


1

There are two main points - what is effective, and what it means small - in terms of hands. For first - for arm wrestling big hands are asset. In other places - not so sure. Let me state it differently. Short people are better in bench press - so if you consider only this one exercise - being small is good. Question is if that is true in other areas as well....


1

As you are recently started, as I read from above, I would say that the fatigue is something very normal. Your ligaments and tendons of your hands are going through a process of adoption. I personally would avoid grip helping utilities until you really start training with heavy weights, as your muscles are taking less time to get used to the stress as your ...


1

IF they are truly feeling achey and fatigued then you can reduce the amount of fatigue by continuing to do what you do. As you train you will be developing your muscles involved in gripping the weight. You could use straps or chalk to help hold the weights in your hand but you should try specifically training your grip first. These answers give great ...


1

It is a training tool, it's just not the ultimate tool that the website claims it to be. I've used it mostly for work on grip strength and forearm stabilization. Use it at a high speed, with a wide fingered grip to promote the grip strength, and rotate the forearm around the "axis". Also you can flex/extend the wrist to work on the forearm. I've used it ...


1

I hate to be the one who has to tell you this, but I have to agree with John P, at least to a degree. Football players have to be packed with a lot of muscles, which is easier attainable with weights. Some exercises that would enhance arm and hand strength probably include bicep curls, bench press, shoulder press, and dumbbell rows. I would honestly be more ...


1

Sitting is quite literally killing you. There is a long thread of answers over here related to fixing the damage that comes from long term computer work. It took months and years to cause the damage, and it will take months and years to repair it fully. You can't stretch and play around with some dumbbells for a couple of weeks and expect anything remotely ...


1

Different methods Parafin-style thing such as ClimbOn (as shown in question) acts as a good massage tool and protection different lotions such as Nivea lotions to heal it faster: getting the fats/ingredients externally around the injured area, the skin will absorb it and it can heal faster. Irritating/massaging: merging scar tissue with healthy tissue, ...


1

Swimmers develop sensitivity in their hands so they can hold water more effectively, by using the feel of water pressure to determine the pitch of their hand. Three tips I have seen are: press the fingertips of one hand hard against the fingertips of the other press your fingertips against the pool deck while resting rub your hands together or on the pool ...


1

Specificity of Exercise: If you want to get more controlled spins in tennis, practice hitting lots of tennis balls with topspin and backspin. Work on accuracy of your spins using different targets and depths. Use a ball machine or have someone consistently feed you tennis balls until you have the mechanics of the stroke mastered. Then add spin shots ...


1

I do the same pushups (although you have me beat on reps!) for both reasons cited: They're a lot easier on my wrists: there's no twisting, my first two knuckles carry the weight right up the radius. It's good training for all sorts of hand techniques: punching, back fist, blocking, etc. If this is not your thing, please return to point 1. My suggestion ...


1

Soak you hands in hot water for a few minutes. gently shave the callus off with a shaver. Apply cornhuskers.


1

For a low tech solution, use a curb. :) Pavement is rough enough to rub them away, and it's easy enough, every time you're sitting somewhere, waiting for a bus or for your ride, to gently rub away at it bit by bit.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible