32

You hit on some common misconceptions, but you also hit on some truths. For instance, you compare the human body to inanimate objects with respect to damage, but you also accurately point out that Obviously, living organisms are not the same as inanimate objects So, what's the difference? The repair process Man-made objects tend to wear out faster with ...


14

I've been in the martial arts for 25+ years (Isshinryu Karate and Aikido) and can tell you first hand, that if you do the standard weight training (bench, squat, dead lift, etc.) and go for the full range of motion and stretch, you WILL NOT have any problems with Kung Fu. Sounds like your Kung Fu instructor is old school, where weight training was ...


12

Your spine and shoulders should be fine, the biggest risk is to the knees. In particular, running with any kind of weights (vest, ruck sack, etc.) puts much more stress on your knees. If you have bad running form, it's even more of a problem. Some quick points to think about: Make sure you have the right shoes for your total weight including the ruck ...


8

Whole body strength is helpful in martial arts; however, many people don't focus on whole body strength. They focus on what they like, as you can see by bird legged people with massive chests and arms. This is not balanced. The best way to build whole body strength is to focus on full range of motion compound lifts like squats, standing press, deadlifts, ...


8

This is an interesting question that had me thinking for a while. It's difficult to answer "why" exactly, other than saying "it is that way", so I'll try to describe the need for exercise and a few benefits it gives. @Alec's answer has neatly addressed your questions about wear and tear so I won't address those. One of the things humans ...


7

Medical Checkup The best way to convince your health insurance provider that you are in great shape is to show them the results of your physical exam showing that you pass with flying colors. Your medical doctor would be the one to determine whether or not you are healthy. BMI is a screening tool - NOT a diagnostic tool. As stated by the CDC: BMI ...


7

You've had a physical, gotten the green light and made the determination to get healthier. The next thing to do is just..well, get out there and start doing it. This doesn't mean that you have to go out tomorrow and jog 4 miles. Start small and work your way up. Tonight, go for a 1/2 mile walk. Do it again tomorrow. And again the next day. Keep going, ...


6

My advice is that controlling one's diet trumps any level of physical exercise you can do, unless you are already physically fit. That is to say, for inactive to moderately active individuals, one's diet has much more influence on health than how much one exercises. Of course, this is not a rationale to avoid exercise. Quite the contrary: it is essential ...


6

For the most part, the science is still unclear on the long term effects of things like long distance running on the body. Some studies have suggested that it can be bad for knee cartilage (in beginners), but goes on to say that their findings were likely not clinically relevant due to experimental error (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24045919). Other ...


6

Most of the migranes are hereditary. Biological states may cause increases in free fatty acids and blood lipids, increased platelet aggregation, decreased serotonin levels and increased prostaglandin levels, which can cause the vasodilatation that precedes migraine headache. One possible reason for this is that a part of the physical reaction may be the ...


5

Having little Timmy at age 3 doing curls is not the same as having big Bobby at age 17 doing curls, so for the purpose of this answer I will assume the base age of 6 as an appropriate minimum for being defined as a youth / child. In the scientific community, it is pretty widely accepted that resistance training is a safe and appropriate activity for ...


5

Hyperventilation is a legitimate method for increasing the proportion of oxygen in the blood for the purpose of things like holding one's breath. However, there is a caveat to it, namely that the body tracks both carbon dioxide levels and oxygen levels, and with what's essentially two different mechanisms. Hyperventilation decreases CO2 faster than it ...


5

Consider a knee: The meniscus absorbs much of the shock of jumps and landings. Tears in the meniscus is a common cause of surgery. Sports with high risk of meniscus tear include american football, soccer, basketball and wrestling. Altough running is high impact this injury do not seem to be common here. Rather it seems that rotation of the knee and ...


4

To lose fat, you need to burn more calories than you consume. You can do this through eating fewer calories, burning more calories (i.e. more exercise), or some combination of the two. A combination of eating fewer calories and exercising more is what I (and probably most people in the health and fitness world) would recommend. Your friend needs to address ...


4

Let me suggest you these articles for a start: G Lippi, GC Guidi, N Maffulli. Air pollution and sports performance in Beijing. "There is little doubt that the presence of several air pollutants might be detrimental to athletic performance due to the marked increase (up to 20-fold) in ventilatory rate and concomitant nasal and oral breathing. Moreover, mouth ...


4

Classic studies usually link air pollution with lung conditions. I find this recent study extremely interesting though: Researchers from Vrije Universiteit Brussel in Belgium split a group of 24 runners into two groups: those from urban areas and those from rural areas. During a 12-week period, the two groups were asked to run three days a ...


4

The fact that body-building stunts growth--or worse, actively makes you shorter--is a myth. It likely grew out of the fact that over-aggressive weight-lifting can cause injury to the ephiphyseal (i.e., "growth") plates in those who have not finished growing. But injuring a growth plate doesn't actually stop that bone from growing, it simply creates a ...


4

Will weight lifting, strength training, etc, stunt my or my child's growth? If you (or your child) aren't sprouting up as quickly as the other kids and you've been lifting weights, it's easy to resort to believing the old wives' tale that you're short because of the weight training. We may never know how this rumor began propagating, but there is certainly ...


4

Every time you have an opportunity to do something physically exerting, do it. Health & Safety Executive recommends: short, frequent breaks are more satisfactory than occasional, longer breaks: e.g., a 5-10 minute break after 50-60 minutes continuous screen and/or keyboard work is likely to be better than a 15 minute break every 2 hours; ...


4

Heart Rate is an individual measure. I have 60. My colleague, who is much fitter than me has 80. Some ultra marathon runner I know has 30. The range is unhelpful huge because RHR is an unhelpful measure. What you can watch out for is changes. You have 80 now, if it changes to 60 without you training much? it's time to see a doctor. It changes to 120? Time ...


4

Interestingly, the risks of mortality between the two conditions, sitting and standing, appear to be causally different. Our understanding of the former is supported by a large body of research demonstrating a general association between sedentary time and mortality. However, occupational sitting is not strongly associated directly with diseases like ...


3

There's little danger in performing cardio at any adult age as long as the safety standards are followed. Every exercise you perform has a proper way of it being executed; do it that way and you would not have any exercise-related injury. Since the doctor already told you there's nothing wrong with you, you have no reason to fear. The paranoia in you is ...


3

The health benefits from being active are just too big to ignore; not only will you feel better, but you will age slower than those who are more sedentary. I would recommend against jogging; it can be hard on the joints, especially for those with some extra weight, but more importantly, it's hard to do, and the harder the activity is, the more likely you ...


3

This was a report by a consumer watchdog organization. The industry asked for and got an independent review by NSF/ANSI, which basically a third party non governmental testing group. It passed their testings. The consumer group also reported that there were varying levels in samples, and not all samples produced the same results. That being said, I would ...


3

A doctor once recommended to abstain from all traumatic sports because of danger of retinal detachment, however this would limit the quality of my life. Having a detached retina will affect the quality of your life more. It may be wise to have an eye exam and get clarification from your eye doctor as to whether or not you are at risk. If you are at risk, ...


3

I believe that juggling is not only good for cardiovascular fitness, endurance, and muscle toning (particularly forearms, biceps, and shoulders), but also reflexes, motor skills, balance, and reaction time. It also increases brain size, creative problem solving, left-right brain coordination, concentration and focus, learning abilities, peripheral vision, ...


3

The harm would be found in a lack of support for parts of your body (or another person's body) that needs support and doesn't benefit from getting tossed about as you run. Chafing is another issue, and a lot of runners will wear bandaids over their nipples to prevent bleeding and broken skin. A lot of folks with big legs wear slick shorts that cover at ...


3

Neither of these supplements are habit forming so no, your body will not "crave" them after you stop using them. However, the effects of both will subside when you stop taking them. If you need to supplement a weight gainer to pack on mass, you will likely need to continue to keep your caloric intake at a certain level to continue to sustain your bulk. ...


3

First, just thought I'd mention that it says when joining this stack exchange that questions should not be opinion based. That said, I usually hang mine on a fold up clothes hanger, or over a railing outside. If these aren't options, you could just rinse them in the sink or toss them in a fresh bucket of water.


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