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41

Your answer lies in your own question: I'm a bit of a couch potato with a sedentary job, who normally gets out of breath walking up a few flights of stairs. Recently I saw an article on TV about an 82 year old guy who has been hill running for decades, and still goes out every day. Stamina is something that can be trained like everything else. As @...


36

If you are really interested in the biology behind fitness then I'd suggest reading Dr. Jack Daniel's "Daniel's Running Formula". I'll paraphrase a few of the points you would read there. The goal is to get oxygen from the air to the muscles that need it. There are several systems involved in this process. Lung capacity Quite simply, how much air can ...


26

EDIT: Since "fit" is a very arbitrary term, I should include my definition, since the asker did not. From the starting point of a 50kg man, I consider fit to include gaining quite a lot of weight, mostly muscle correcting most, if not all, posture imperfections and muscular imbalances learning proper form in all exercises, and learning how to utilize ...


16

Cardiovascular endurance and general conditioning. Simply put, the body will adapt to whatever your regular activities are. The fuel that you provide your body with also plays a part, but your conditioning is what makes the biggest difference. Muscle size is largely irrelevant to something like walking, but it can help if you were trying to sprint faster. ...


15

Congratulations on opting for a healthy lifestyle. It is way too easy to get into the trap of a sedentary lifestyle. The younger you start getting back in shape, the easier it is with more lifetime benefits. If you have any medical problems check with your doctor first. (Standard disclaimer, but worthwhile. Even at your age you may have signs of a ...


12

I'm curious to know what makes him (and the walkers I saw) "fit" - where does his stamina comes from? He was stick thin like me, so I guess muscles don't play a huge role in it. I can only assume it's down to heart and lung efficiency? Well, a quick look at that man's body may not have given you an accurate enough picture of his body's composition. He ...


11

The first thing that separates extreme athletes from most of the rest of us is the amount of energy they require. It's true that when you need to consume 12,000 Calories to keep up with your training, you simply can't eat clean. It's easy to make up all the protein the body needs within that amount of Calories, so these athletes can eat pretty much ...


10

You are asking about the effects of a sedentary lifestyle. This is certainly related to physical fitness, or rather a lack thereof, contrary to what some of my fellow members here feel. There are a number of physiological adaptations that will result from too much inactivity. I like to say that our bodies are built to be as lazy as possible. Efficiency ...


9

At a first glimpse the standing desks seem like another "improvement" companies throw to an item to make customers upgrade and re-buy the same thing. Essentially it's just a desk, right? That's what I thought until I started my current job which provided me with a standing desk. My job is sedentary and very static. I experimented and on some days remained ...


9

A recent meta-analysis of 23 published studies is MacEwen, MacDonald, and Burr, "A systematic review of standing and treadmill desks in the workplace," Preventative Medicine 70(January 2015):50-58. The article is here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.11.011 Quoting from the paper's summary: Treadmill desks led to the greatest improvement in ...


8

There is no set/rep scheme for overall health. That's like asking which computer mouse best prevents cancer. If you want functional strength, do functional exercises. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Functional_training


8

There is nothing scientific why one would walk 10.000 steps over let's say, 8.000 steps or 12.000 steps. It dates back to somewhere in the 1960s, by a company in Japan. They created a product which name would be "10.000 steps meter". Studies later confirmed that people who walk 10.000 steps a day have lower blood pressure, more stable glucose levels and ...


7

Medical Checkup The best way to convince your health insurance provider that you are in great shape is to show them the results of your physical exam showing that you pass with flying colors. Your medical doctor would be the one to determine whether or not you are healthy. BMI is a screening tool - NOT a diagnostic tool. As stated by the CDC: BMI ...


7

We evolved to find calorie-dense foods very tasty, and we don't have taste-receptors for micro-nutrients When humans (and most of their predecessors) did most of our evolving, low-calorie plants were plentiful. Sweet fruit wasn't usually around all year. Meat could be hunted, but it required plenty of energy and effort, and was usually quite lean. (Much ...


7

I know that bodybuilding makes you heavier, stronger and more attractive, but is it really beneficial for one's health in the long run? Bodybuilding is not strength training. Bodybuilding is a very specific practice to improve one's looks. Strength training, by contrast, is training to improve the capabilities of one's body. Strength training is the ...


7

According to Dr. Jos Verbeek of The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, "What we actually found is that most of it is, very much, just fashionable and not proven good for your health."


7

First let's look at what your acquaintance actually does to the diet itself. Suppose that his normal TDEE is 2500 kcal. That means, at his regular activity level given his job and physique, training not considered, he'd need about 2500 kcal per day to supply his body with the energy it needs. Eating that, there would be neither weight gain from excess ...


7

Probably about 2 years. That said, enjoy the journey. You get benefits along the way. Training can be fun. Some of the biggest gains come at the beginning. A few extra thoughts: Train safe. Injury setbacks are the worst hurdle. Start very light. Plenty of time to amp up the intensity over the next two years. It keeps you safe when you are a novice, ...


7

I'll attack this from two angles. The potential and the actual. Potential This is the more obvious. A major benefit of being previously trained is becoming trained again is much easier. In other words, "muscle memory." Ideally, you will start exercising again at some point. You will gain muscle more easily than if you never trained. Furthermore, you will ...


6

BMI is an actuarial table, and while grossly inaccurate for people with muscular or other types of extreme builds, for a general guideline it will work, especially if you are mainly targeting fat loss. So, take a look at the BMI scale, pick out a reasonable weight goal and aim for that in the beginning. To start, I would not only design an exercise program, ...


6

There's a 2005 study, and plenty of others, that show a clear dopamine release when sugar is ingested. This one shows that (in rats) it's on par with addictive narcotics. These results suggest another neurochemical similarity between intermittent bingeing on [sugar] and drugs of abuse: both can repeatedly increase extracellular [dopamine]. This 2013 ...


6

Yes, it's entirely possible. Exercises such as squats are compound muscle exercises, which means they work many muscles at the same time. These are generally considered as "must have" because they do work so many muscles, and generally give good results. The other exercises are what are called "isolation" exercises, since they mostly work one muscle group ...


6

The bottom line is you want your shoulder in a neutral position. That doesn't necessarily mean full scapular retraction, but it's a cue that helps a lot of people. Considering your level of experience, and the fact you came off of injury I would advise you to use that scapular retraction, but only to the point where your shoulder is in a neutral position. ...


6

Though it's a very general question, here's a few guidelines I follow for a healthy life: Go active. The Western culture have become way too inactive, a way of life our body is not accustomed to. Especially if you spend hours in a deskjob, make sure you exercise or perform some jogging on daily basis. Saying that, you shouldn't go hard & heavy everyday. ...


5

"Feel free to drop me a line on any hints or grandfatherly advice you might have. I'm doing this on my free time." - from your profile If you want to get in good shape and look athletic, then become athletic. 1/2 hr walks and a decent diet will only get you so far, theres not really anybody i know who does this that I would consider physically fit or more ...


5

Some exercise is indeed better than no exercise. Calisthenics would be a fine choice, as would yoga, dumbbell work, running, or some combination of those options. Anything is better than nothing. If you have half an hour, then twenty minutes of yoga to limber up before doing a bunch of push-ups, air squats, and pull-ups would probably hit the spot. If you ...


5

Step 1: consult a doctor to determine: If it's really hemorrhoids The severity if it is And the protocol to remedy it. If the hemorrhoid was caused by lifting, then know it won't get any better if you continue lifting the way you do. You can work through minor hemorrhoids, but refine your technique. Step 2: fix your form You'll find that you need to ...


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