12

First every HR monitor will read your HR differently. To get an actual reading you will need to do a Vo2Max test at a Doctor. 2nd You are listing quite a large range for 30 minutes. There is a difference between 30 minutes at 171 and 30 minutes solid at 190. What is your average? Finally, the VO2Max is only attainable in the lab and a formula is only a ...


8

First, a bit about physiology. Just like some people have big feet and some people have small feet, some people have big hearts and some people have small hearts. Those that have smaller hearts have higher heart rates in general; their resting rates won't be as low and their maximum rates may be higher. That's just natural variability. It's also generally ...


7

If you enjoy it and feel great (and still do, after a week) then you aren't doing damage. But you may not be optimising your results either... Perception of effort is a better guide to exercise intensity than HRM and "rules of thumb" about training zones. If you can train for 30 minutes at steady output (as measured by the exercise bike) then you are ...


7

The primary way to reduce your heart rate is to reduce the pace. The other way is to improve the technique, which will increase the efficiency, however this is not easy and the result is not likely to be dramatic. I am convinced your problem is different, though. Recommendations for running heart rate zones are often misleading for a particular individual, ...


6

220 - Age for maximum heart rate is one of the worst myths in sports. Your maximum heart rate may be less than 179, or it may be much more. For example, I am currently in my late 40's, and I regularly hit in the high 190's on hill sprint cycling workouts. There are various step tests and self administered tests that you can do outlined on the web, I would ...


6

Heart rate is extremely variable, and can go up or down with environmental factors such as heat or cold, foods containing stimulants like caffeine or depressants such as alcohol, standing up versus lying down/sitting, etc. The two ways that I usually use to recommend for using pulse as a gauge of fitness and/or overtraining, is to take it every morning as ...


6

Again, this is something that is subjective and going to vary from person to person. I generally monitor my HR a few times during the week first thing when I wake up, and occasionally when I'm just sitting around watching TV. These will give you baselines. When I finish a workout, I'll take my HR immediately, and once again in a minute or two. These are ...


6

Heart rate monitors can be broadly classified into thee groups based on how they communicate with the fitness equipment. They are - Bluetooth - Most latest HRMs these days use bluetooth to communicate with the fitness devices, including fitness watching and gym equipment. If you use the latest models, it is very likely that they use bluetooth. One extra ...


5

I agree with doing a self-administered test. The tough ones aren't fun, but you'll know the truth. Run a 5k race or time trial hard, running the last 1k-800m increasingly faster. Sprint hard to the end. Find a long, hard hill (e.g., ~2 minutes from bottom to top). Run up it 2-3 times. Push hard as you get to the top. Run 2km on a track, increasing pace with ...


5

There are a couple of ways to use heart rate to estimate fitness. Take it as soon as you wake up in the morning. Lower heart rates are better. Take it immediately after stopping exercise (Such as a run) and then again a few minutes later. Both of these will require tracking, so that you can get a good estimation of your heart rate over time. If you notice ...


5

It's not clear what training your advisor has, but it would be a great idea to consult with your physician, especially if there is a family history of heart problems. If you physician has concerns, she might order an exercise stress test to look for possible cardiac issues. As for your question, if you are just starting an exercise program, it's a good ...


5

There is a simple answer that lies in both your question and in the chart you provide. Your question says, “…is it bad to train...”. Training implies you are trying to improve. Zone 5, is not improving and therefore not training. The chart says zone 5 is “Recommended for: Very fit persons with athletic training background.” Have you already been ...


5

A little while ago I was playing Dance Dance Revolution and finally managed to make it through the most intense song I'm currently capable of without dying. That is, running out of health meter in the game. But I also didn't die physically. I wear a heart monitor while playing and at the end it showed 203 BPM. My age at that moment (it's about a month ago) ...


4

According to this article: heart-rate recovery is defined as the decrease in person's heart rate, measured 1 minute after peak exercise with "peak exercise" described as being as strenuous as possible, possibly even larger than the theoretical maximum heart rate (220 - age). The article also defines a certain cut-off point: recovery rate of less than ...


4

I think you may be overdoing the run, even considering your weight and training history. When they say run in the typical couch to 5k (c25k) program, they merely mean a jogging pace. If you ARE doing nothing more than a jogging pace and still hitting heart rates that are that high, I would go for an actual clinical stress test. (That's probably not a bad ...


4

Outside of viral internet stories, cardiac arrest during exercise is exceedingly rare. It is estimated to occur between 1 in 40,000 to 1 in 80,000 athletes per year. Even then, it's usually caused by some other underlying issue that the athlete was previously unaware of. So it's not really something to worry about. Other parts of your body will start ...


4

In my opinion (especially since it is my answer you linked above) :), the 220-age should never really be used. There is a better generic formula (See the bolded parts of the study conclusion below), and there are also cohort (group) specific formula that may be available that are more accurate. This is a study review of the science behind the 220-age ...


4

Heart Rate is an individual measure. I have 60. My colleague, who is much fitter than me has 80. Some ultra marathon runner I know has 30. The range is unhelpful huge because RHR is an unhelpful measure. What you can watch out for is changes. You have 80 now, if it changes to 60 without you training much? it's time to see a doctor. It changes to 120? Time ...


3

The relationship between your: resting, maximum and recovery rates has been shown to correlate with your bodies ability to consume Oxygen (VO2max), which itself correlates with the conversion of fats and sugars to ATP, to fuel your muscles. So a few pulse measurements is a fairly commonly used and easy means to assess / estimate fitness. Have a read of "101 ...


3

There is a rule of thumb that anything below 80%HRMax is working within the aerobic zone, whereas above you are heading towards threshold and anaerobic zones (being able to sustain these harder efforts for less and less time). Personally, when training aerobically, I aim for roughly 75% and not higher, even when it comes to hills. There is thought within the ...


3

As Julii alludes to, "zones" are pretty much arbitrary, as you are burning fat as a fuel in all zones, just the percentage to which it contributes to the whole is different for different effort levels. As you get higher in intensity, the more you rely on stored carbohydrates (glucose), and the lower in intensity, the more you rely on fat. They are both still ...


3

In my personal experience, "maximum heart rate" is a bit of a wildcard but the Mayo Clinic describes it as: ...the upper limit of what your cardiovascular system can handle during physical activity. I've always understood that as "the maximum heart rate your body can safely achieve." It's not like you drop dead one BPM over your "max", and there's way ...


3

I'm not positive about the premise here. There are certainly cases of runners having cyclist like VO2 levels. Also, cyclists are way more testing conscious. The fact of the matter is elite cycling is a heavily technologically based sport, while elite marathoning is not. Lance Armstrong was getting wind tunnel tested back in the day. Meanwhile, the ...


3

VO2max is not super important for 10k. It's correlated with performance, but it's not a good predictor. (Source) Don't worry too much about HR or VO2max. You should focus on performance. If you're improving your times and running longer distances, then it doesn't matter if your watch says your VO2max is decreasing. If your resting HR is increasing, ...


2

Palpitations can be a result of many things going on with your heart. Atrial Fibrillation, 1st 2nd or 3rd degree heart blocks, and a few others come to mind. The important thing to note is any time you heart starts doing something abnormal, even if you aren't sure if it is a normal response, CALL YOUR DOCTOR. Most exercise induced palpitations can be worked ...


2

Normal heart rate recovery is a decrease in your hr of 20-25 bpm (in 1 minute). For a fitter person it would be 30-45 bpm (in 1 minute). Abnormal heart rate recovery is usually defined as 12 or fewer bpm (in 1 minute). For the number 12 this is the ref


2

Climbing steps will raise the heart rate more than walking. Generally, that is a good thing; you get more of a workout, burn more calories, and improve your aerobic fitness. If you are generally good help, the more stairs the better.


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