6

You can't. You've been answering your own question. There have to be various other ways to improve things like muscle synthesis; improve satellite cell functioning; increase nervous system and muscle recovery; and even increase size too. Increase compared to what? You state no baseline for comparison. Obviously besides just working out and "hoping." I'...


6

Performing compound exercise movements have been shown to trigger the pituitary gland to release Human Growth Hormone. HGH does not discriminate against the muscle cells it targets. In a paper titled Growth Hormone and the Heart, it was shown that GH exerts direct effects on myocardial growth and function. Evidence from laboratory models shows that ...


5

This is a terrible idea. Being sleep-deprived makes that workout suffer, particularly for high-intensity workouts. More importantly, sleep debt is not "paid back" with a single night of copious sleep. Not getting enough sleep can take a few days to fix.


5

The time of day that is most beneficial to lift weights is the time of day you can do it consistently. There's a few things that you need to know about circadian rhythms: The effects of hormonal cycles during waking hours are minimal They adapt to your pattern of life If you can more consistently train in the afternoon, your body will adjust to make it so ...


3

I'm not aware of any concrete studies on the matter, but basically CNS fatigue can be summed up like this: it's the overall degradation of hormones and neurotransmitters that are required for sustained physical output. I wrote an answer a while back that gets into the fairly low level chemical actions that limit strength output, it's worth reading if you ...


3

Working out too hard can overload the hormonal system. You can produce too much cortisol, which elevates inflammation and depletes testosterone. It can take months to recover from real overtraining, but you're probably not overtrained. However, sleep, nutrition and certain supplements can keep you from being overtaxed and prevent burnout. Overtraining Is ...


3

I wrote a full blown blog post on this exact issue. You can check it out here: http://www.primalbulletproof.blogspot.co.nz/2015/01/my-favourite-sleeping-well-techniques.html To summarize, sleep is critical for immunity repair and to be at your cognitive peak. I can especially feel the lack of sleep the morning after when I do my gym training session. ...


3

Being deprived of sleep can significantly affect your testosterone levels. "I can drop your testosterone level to zero by depriving you of sleep for one night." - Dr. Kirk Parsley I would recommend against your approach. For more information about the importance of sleep, listen to this episode of Barbell Shrugged.


2

You don't want to hear it, but it's a reality that anyone who's messed around with steroids and hormones can attest to: the only way you verify test levels is medically. There are saliva testosterone tests you can buy online (amazon, etc) without a physician's reference but honestly you can't "eyeball" your testosterone levels: it needs to come from a test. ...


1

Strength training certainly can make bones denser and also strengthen the ligaments, although the actual length of a bone is not changed.


1

I'd be very surprised if arousal had any statistically significant effect on muscle growth/recovery. By that token, testosterone levels are supposedly highest in the morning and gradually decline during the day, which would suggest working out early in the day would produce a measurable benefit. I've never seen any evidence of this. My subjective view is ...


1

So my friends and I theorized this while in undergrad and being industrious college students we did some research and could never find any evidence that sexual arousal significantly helped or hurt training. Here is an article on the topic that cites additional sources.


1

Firstly, only your doctor can know if your levels are actually low enough to cause these symptoms, so you should ask them. I'm only including the rest of this answer to let you know it's worth asking. As it relates to fitness, low levels of testosterone can lead to reduced muscle and bone mass [1]. Low muscle mass (and presumably reduced muscular gain) is ...


1

IMHO Quit drinking too much coffee. It helps. Also low carb diets reduce sleep hours and fasting as well. But generally , there is no reason to sleep less in order to sleep more. Heavy workout effect is much longer then 1 day.


1

The natural testosterone level in male, is around 200-1200ng/dl, while in women is around 15-70ng/dl. There is a significant diference here, and this is the reason why women have it quite dificult to gain muscle. Anyway, using steroids as you say, stops the endogenous testosterone production. Here is where a woman has to consider if she wants to mantain ...


1

Some women get really big, and are biggest than 90% of males in the fitness industry. However just adding testosterone isn't enough to eliminate the physiological difference between the sexes.


1

Although we'd like to think the sexes are equal, when it comes to physiology, we are in fact quite different from one another. So the same nutrient or supplement may not have the exact same response in the body, primarily due to our hormonal differences (testosterone, estrogen, etc.). I highly recommend reading the mars/venus diet solution written by Dr. ...


1

Eating will not affect your result Getting inadequate sleep might give a lower result since testo is synthesized more during sleep Refrain from heavy exercise in the days before since that might increase cortisol and give an unfavorable testosterone/cortisol ratio and a lower reading; in overtraining syndrome, one of the worst signs is a lowered testosterone ...


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