21

Whether or not it is necessary to wait an hour depends on you, actually. Some people can drink a lot and go run, some people can't. However, unless you are chronically dehydrated or exercising in extreme weather conditions, you won't need water for most of your runs. You should be getting most of your hydration from your diet during the course of the day, ...


16

Not all sugars are the same. Glucose is a monosaccharide, and is easily utilized by nearly all cells of the body for energy. Fructose, also a monosaccharide, is not: it is almost exclusively metabolized by the liver. Excess consumption of fructose causes a variety of problems that would not occur with glucose consumption. Sucrose ("table sugar" or "cane ...


13

Unless you're running in extreme heat conditions, for 30 minutes to an hour you really don't need any on course hydration. Drink some water beforehand, and afterwards to replenish sweat loss, and you should be fine. I've run up to 2 hours without on course hydration in moderate conditions. There is some evidence that even 2% dehydration can start to cause ...


10

I wouldn't worry about reducing my water intake during a run in hot weather. Just because your fellow runners don't drink anything doesn't mean it is a good idea for you (or them). Particularly under the conditions you are describing I would recommend you keep drinking water. It will help you perform better. As to the weight loss during the run: are you ...


6

I've reduced my water consumption during bike races to a minimum, see my question about this. I try not to drink anything within the first hour of activity, depending on the temperature this time varies, of course. While running is a bit different from biking I think it isn't absolutely necessary to carry something to drink while running, if you are unsure, ...


6

Disclaimer: I am not a professional of any kind in this or any related field. I am not in fantastic shape, either. All I can really say for my cred is that I exercise regularly and I've completed a handful of races without dying. For the purposes of this Q&A, I am going to assume that the reason this sounds like quackery is because you are interested in ...


5

Your caffeine consumption, practically speaking, probably does not affect your workouts positively or negatively. As @JohnP pointed out, caffeine studies are on greater amounts than a couple of cans of tea per day. According to the Sports Med. 2001;31(11):785-807, "ingestion of caffeine as coffee appears to be ineffective compared to doping with pure ...


4

Well, hydration relies on some basic principles: Drink a bit of water, all the time (not at specific times) Under physical activity, increase frequency Use mild temperature water (20-22ºC is the recommended tmp. if I'm not mistaken) (cold water refreshes but does not hydrate, mild water hydrates but does not refresh) Include non-dry fruits & vegetables ...


4

At this point, recommending anything specific is just as likely to cause bad effects as it is good. By this I mean that you have no time to test during a race type workout that a drink with additives (Such as electrolytes, calories) won't give you an upset stomach or similar. By now you should have been on several training rides of at least the same ...


4

Why would you want to cut your water intake? The sweating is your body attempting to shed heat and cool itself. If you deliberately cut your water intake, you are short circuiting your cooling efforts. Also, you are not only losing water weight. You are also using up glycogen, which has a weight to it. An hour run is long enough you will see a significant ...


4

Hydration is paramount with any form of exercise. Hydration is a necessary component of all metabolic processes. This includes building muscle. However, hydration is also a bit more than just drinking water. Proper hydration requires that you keep your electrolytes in balance. Electrolyte imbalance is more critical in endurance training than ...


4

Water intake should mainly be used to stave off dehydration, which can happen as early as a 1.5% body weight loss. Depending on how much/quickly you sweat, the time for this to happen can take a short period of time or a long one. Most likely, with exercise under an hour long, you're not going to lose that much water. If you want to see if you're hitting ...


4

Personally I feel like the thirst response is the primary go-to for what hydration your body needs, but it's not exactly fool proof. There was a 1991 study showing that, as men (and probably) women age, they have reduced thirst and are at increased risk of dehydration. The participants in the study you linked were young-ish: Twenty healthy participants (...


4

Creating draws more water into your muscle cells, which helps to increase muscle bulk and also increase protein synthesis (1)(2), although the total amount of water involved is relatively small. It may be this, or anecdotal evidence that creatine causes cramps - which does not appear to be backed up by evidence (3)(4), which has caused some articles to ...


3

It is hard to say what the reasons for your problems are. It is impossible to give personal correct answer without knowing you. But I can give you some advices which helped me: Eat and drink enough before you start your training, if you have too little energy it is like going through hell. Your Training has to be suitable for yourself, if you are a ...


3

Cooling of the body largely happens via evaporation of water, whether it's the water in your sweat or an external source. There's an additional cooling that happens when doused with water in that some of the heat is likely to be transferred to the water, which then drips away. On the other hand, you're increasing the amount of weight you're carrying, ...


3

There isn't any significant difference between both options. That being said, cold water hydrates more effectively than room temperature. According to this source, During intense physical activity, the body's core temperature rises above the normal 98.6°F (37°C). Drinking cool water lowers the body's temperature and helps it settle back to its normal range. ...


3

It is impossible to say what and how much "is enough" without more detailed information. But in general, if you are exercising at an intensity where you are sweating, then failure to replenish will definitely impact your performance. Coconut water is well studied and one of the most natural hydration substances available. I just wanted to mention it ...


3

When the human body goes from laying prone to standing up there is a rapid, and brief, change in blood pressure. This is the likely cause. Some people are more susceptible than others, and it's called orthostatic hypotension, or sometimes, "vertigo." “He's Dizzy when he Stands Up.” An Introduction to Initial orthostatic Hypotension Orthostatic hypotension


3

To add to the two previous answers alerady... Hydration as a WHOLE needs to be addressed more so than the hydration one understakes right before running. One should be adaquately hydrated in general. You do dehydrate as you sleep though through breathing (especially in the winter when the air can be dry) and sweat. You could also drink a less amount of ...


3

I don't mean this so much as a definitive answer so much an anecdotal one. A few years ago I discovered that my morning run times were measurably better, and I FELT much better, if I drank a whole liter of water right before bed. I continue to do this when I plan on running the following morning.


2

If you're interested in not carrying water or carrying smaller quantities, you could be creative with your running routes. Find a neighborhood, running track or path where you can park your car to retrieve water. By running short loops or out-and-back patterns, you can either simulate a race by getting water every two miles or, what I prefer, which is to ...


2

It is not exactly clear what your intentions are. If you drink tons of water your kidneys are not happy. You will have many bio-breaks ;) In case of (muscle) workouts you can increase the amount of water in your muscles by using creatine. If your intention is only to drink enough water before a training session you could eat vegetables/fruits with a high ...


2

If I'm running in a hot race then I'll dump a glass of water over the back of my head (targetting the area just where my neck meets my head). Why? I want to reduce the risk of heat stroke and other heat related problems. If that area of the brain gets too hot then I have a very serious problem. More than that, I find that sense of relief it brings to be ...


2

Agreed with Sean on weight increase due to the water and possible chaffing.There is a good reason why our bodies sweat. Its a cooling mechanism. You should be more worried about keeping your self hydrated rather than drenching yourself in water. An arbitrary example; Imagine a water-cooling system for a high performance computer that is number crunching ...


2

What your instructor is saying is quackery. However, why not make her happy? You might not need to drink water during the class. I think there is a bit of paranoia about hydrating that says you need to constantly be drinking water, and I'm not sure there is scientific evidence for this. I do an hour and ten minute weight lifting workout without drinking ...


2

Anytime someone quotes Ayurvedic alternative medicine, it should instantly raise your spider sense. There are yoga instructors that have a good grounding science/reality but there are also plenty that just regurgitate the dumb crap they learn in their certifications. Your instructors justification is horseshit but maybe they are just hoping to convince you ...


2

In yoga meta-physiology, burping is controlled by a specific prana, one of five major ones. An excess of burping would be considered an imbalance of the prana controlling that specific bodily function. Yoga practices, when presented in a balanced manner, would balance the five mjor pranas in the body resulting in overall health and possible addressing of the ...


2

There is no doubt that hypohydration negatively affects performance, both independently of thirst and independently of knowledge of our hydration status. Recent blind studies (here, here, here, and here) confirm the results of earlier research, whilst addressing its proposed methodological issues. There has long been, and remains, considerable question about ...


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