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If you look at the basics you'll see that you don't need weight, you need resistance. The most common way of finding resistance is by using weight because you can increase it in steps, making progressive overload easily achievable. But you can also work without weights and find increasingly harder exercises rather than making the same exercise harder. I ...


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My experience seems to show that you can't significantly change anything regarding your physique with solely your body weight, even if you work out regularly for years. You can absolutely change your physique and put on muscle mass using only bodyweight. This area of working out is called callisthenics. One of my favourite callisthenics YouTubers is Chris ...


3

Bodyweight training can be referred to as calisthenics, which is a widely popular training methodology that can result in decent muscle mass. It may be a slower progression than traditional weight lifting, but you can certainly build a sizable lean physique. Your example of Brad Pitt from Fight Club is actually a pretty good example of what can be ...


2

My experience seems to show that you can't significantly change anything regarding your physique with solely your body weight, even if you work out regularly for years. On the other hand, you can find loads of shredded YouTube individuals arguing that you can build your muscles effectively with nothing but your body weight. Where's the truth? ...


2

If your goal is purely defined by 'relative strength' objectives, then gaining additional mass may not be that desirable. Sure. Relative Strength = Amount of weight you can lift, relative to your bodyweight. Absolute Strength = The maximum amount of weight you can lift, irrespective of bodyweight. Generally speaking, smaller lifters do have higher ...


1

If you already are strong and have all the muscle mass you need then you can probably train only in the 1-5 rep range and become even stronger without increasing weight. However keep in mind that skeletal muscle mass is only a fraction of your weight. Also a lot of this muscle mass is in your legs, especially if you are not used to strength training. So ...


1

A simplified answer - yes. It depends on any secondary goals you have too, do you want to achieve immense strength in any specific movement, learn a skill (handstand, front lever, etc.), obtain a certain type of physique, improve your overall fitness level, etc. If you do have them, it’s good to train movements specific to your goal. There are articles ...


1

If you desire a thorough review of strength training and analyze how many variables affect the results, I would direct you towards Supertraining by Yuri V Verkhoshansky & Mel C Siff. One of the bible of training... but not an easy read. Regarding your specific question, as many times in training, it depends. On you and your objectives. If objective is ...


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Optimal is different from people to people and I can hardly find credible scientific literature. They usually extrapolate from couple of hundreds people experiments, questionable training experience (people with sedentary lifestyle can improve a lot just with better eating and suboptimal training), etc. If there would be a one-regimen-fits-all, no coach ...


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Does the squat allow to estimate the 5WD at the barbell lunges? No. It does not. Having a higher squat may allow you to have a higher lunge just by the fact that it makes you stronger. However, they are fundamentally different movements and as such, there is no set formula where you can guess what weight your lunge should be. The strategy to find the ...


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