Hot answers tagged

15

It depends. With ibuprofen in particular, the anti-inflammatory properties are beneficial. Initially inflammation is important for healing an injury, but too much inflammation is detrimental. Based on that I prefer to take ibuprofen if the inflammation persists, but not immediately after getting the injury. Pain killers can also indirectly contribute to ...


10

Many people make the mistake in running that they think it's ok to just go out and run, without any base training. This misconception leads to a lot of injuries. My LONG run for the entire week is 10ish miles, and that's when I'm running between 30-40 miles/week. If you don't have a lot of base, then 10 miles twice a week is not what I would recommend. Plus,...


10

Here is some of the the best available evidence regarding knee problems and osteoarthritis (OA): Virtually all activities require weight bearing will put stress on the knee joints Activities and sports that will put more stress on the knees are (football, jumping, long distance running, soccer, and any other sports that require constant cutting, pivoting ...


7

I actually run in vibrams, and when I first began my calves were extremely sore for the first week or two. I think this is due mostly to the fact barefoot running forces people to run as nature intended, on the ball of the foot, causing the calf to work harder in order to support the weight. This would also put more tension on the Achilles tendon since it ...


7

You can do sit-ups isolating the one leg which you have injured. Planks might help you a little but they are not all that challenging for the abs area after one moment onwards. The only exercise that I can think of right now that will completely isolate your knee(and is not very advanced) is the dragon flag. It got popular thanks to bruce lee who ...


7

If the pain is in the joint, it is likely to be an inflammation based problem known as tendinitis. Tendinitis happens when you have bad form, inadequate warmup, poor equipment, and/or unbalanced work. There is likely some swelling, even if it's not visible on the surface. For the most immediate relief, the protocol I use is: Compress the joint--should ...


7

The nature of those two movements is different. The lorry driver performs continous, non-changing movements which wear out the cartilage of the joints and the tendons and ligaments. Every movement induces slight inflammation in the structures involved. One difference is that the lorry driver performs the same movement every day, without the possibility of ...


7

Recommendations With Little Impact on Joints Biking: If you have access to a stationary bike or you have an actual bike, this is a good exercise for you. There isn't a lot of stress on the joints and you can go at your own pace (although going fast is recommended). If you have access to a Spin class also, I would recommend it as you would have a lot of fun ...


7

Well, on the scary side, squats can lead to lower-back problems, spinal compression, torn ligaments in several parts of the body, burst capillaries, blown knees, or compound fractures of the leg. On the other hand, major injuries are rare, and even the minor ones are unlikely with good technique (keeping your knees over your feet and a straight back). And ...


7

Yes, you do. Additionally it will take more than 48 hours for those injuries to repair so it's entirely possible that you'll be pulling the bar across unhealed wounds. It doesn't take much to realize that your blood and body fluids are now on the bar that you put back, perhaps with a towel wipe which doesn't really do much, and now the next person is using ...


6

I hope that your knee issues have gotten better. However, there are a few things that can cause knee pains on a bike. Seat height - Having a seat that is way too high or low can place odd stresses on the knees, and if it is too high, can also cause hip issues because you have to "rock" back and forth on the seat to stay on the pedals. A good bike fit can ...


6

Squatting actually helped me recover the normal use of my leg. I tore my ACL 10 years ago and suffered a failed autograft surgery where the surgeon cut out the middle 1/3 of my patella tendon and used that as the acl replacement. The surgery failed and my knee cap shifted out-of-place because of the cut petella tendon. After 10 years, I was suffering from ...


6

The bottom line is you want your shoulder in a neutral position. That doesn't necessarily mean full scapular retraction, but it's a cue that helps a lot of people. Considering your level of experience, and the fact you came off of injury I would advise you to use that scapular retraction, but only to the point where your shoulder is in a neutral position. ...


5

The doctor said ... that I would recover 100% movement of the joint. In the context of your question, this provides us with little help. The fact that you will, at some point, fully recover is not to say that you are fully recovered as of this present moment. In fact, considering that your original question included the wording "my wrist still feels weak" ...


5

I am an active duty Marine and following an injury and MRI that revealed a completely torn ACL, torn MCL, and bilateral miniscal tear, I was back to working out my leg within roughly 2 months. By the way, I was in Afghanistan 3.5 weeks following the tear. It was a slow process and incremental in nature, but effective. To the root of your question though, yes,...


5

Calf tenderness is a common occurrence with barefoot/minimalist running. The achilles is in the back of the leg, from the knee to the back of the heel. It is NOT a shock absorber, but is a stabilizing muscle and propulsing muscle. It works harder when one runs barefoot. Barefoot running is something that needs to be very gradually introduced into a ...


5

"Proper running form" is much more comprehensive than just the foot strike. Running with a fore/mid/heel strike are all valid IF you're not suffering as a result and the rest of your mechanics are sound. Focusing on foot strike alone will not yield a more efficient run. It is my opinion (after several years of running and trial and error) that getting your ...


5

I think the most versatile shoulder exercise is the handstand push-up (HSPU) or a variation of it. The benefit of this movement is that no equipment is required. I understand that as a personal trainer, your clientele may not have the ability to perform this exercise, so there are quite a few options for scaling based on the fitness level of the trainee. ...


5

Step 1: consult a doctor to determine: If it's really hemorrhoids The severity if it is And the protocol to remedy it. If the hemorrhoid was caused by lifting, then know it won't get any better if you continue lifting the way you do. You can work through minor hemorrhoids, but refine your technique. Step 2: fix your form You'll find that you need to ...


5

First of all, if your fingers are constantly under stress and they are not recovering properly, this can lead to nerve damage in the wrist and elbow which is known as a repetitive stress injury. Much of your 'finger' strength in rock-climbing and tennis is generated by your forearm. So increasing forearm strength will increase the strength of your fingers. ...


4

I squat and deadlift 600 pounds 10 years after a failed ACL reconstruction. I experience minimal issues while weight lifting heavy 3-5 days/week. (The lack of the ACL never causes me problems. My knee's stable during the exercises. But my failed surgery was a patellar autograft. The graft harvest caused my patella to move, and the poor patellar tracking that ...


4

Asymmetric pain usually means either some sort trauma-based injury (e.g. banging your knee) or muscle imbalance. Without more detail on your wife's habits it's difficult to say which, but I can give you a general idea of how to isolate it. If it is a trauma-based injury, the pain will typically be localized to a specific area (for example, the dorsal plane ...


4

You are wise to ask because this is an injury that you want to heal well. 3 weeks is not very long into the healing of a fracture. Most references that I looked up tell you that your therapist will direct your safe return to activity. A PT (physical therapist) or OT (occupational therapist) who specialize in hands (hand therapist) are the best ones to ...


4

What you need is a rehab program to get you back to good shape, followed by a proper program to prevent the condition from happening again. I have to qualify my answer by the fact I am not a physical therapist, and I highly recommend you see one. In general, rehab programs involve ridiculously light weight with ridiculously high repetitions. You will be ...


4

I don't know what would aggravate your knee injury or not, but I would give planks a try. They're a good abs exercise in general, and they don't involve any movement of any joints, just a static hold.


4

Ask yourself this question: What's the likelihood of re-injuring the finger? The finger will take as long as it takes to get better, and running isn't going to change that significantly enough to worry about it if at all. As long as there is a low likelihood that you are going to hurt the finger again doing any activity, there is no reason to avoid it. ...


4

BackInShapeBuddy has given you some great tips. Here is my advice in addition to scientific evidence to prevent recurrent muscle strains: You will need to start performing dynamic warm-up. In addition, I strongly recommend you to perform 2 sets of 10 reps of burpee push-ups before any chest exercises from now on. You will also need to start training ...


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