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7

As a preface, although your concerns about the validity of the field of chiropractic are entirely warranted, it appears that Dr. Stuart M. McGill is indeed qualified. He was a former professor at the University of Waterloo, holding Ph.D., Masters, and Bachelors degrees in Kinesiology (Biomechanics), Kinanthropology (Biomechanics), and Physical and Health ...


3

To address your question directly, you should not do any running or HIIT training until your Achilles tendinitis has healed fully. And that recovery should include a tentative and gradual return to your regular training volume and intensity. Loads equivalent to 2–3 times the body's weight are typically exerted on each leg during running, and the ‘high’ part ...


2

I agree with JohnP, hard to say. But I suggest you give running a break. Try barefoot walking lunges, they can reveal if your balance/step is good. What to do: rest, roll, stretch, strengthen, see a professional. The IT band seems to be a common culprit. Try these if not refer back. https://www.athletico.com/2012/06/05/it-band-syndrome-the-top-5-causes-...


2

Yes, yoga can help. The main reason for all your muscle issues is, for sure, sedentary way of life & stress. I would recommend you to start with gentle morning routine to strengthen your muscles. For instance, the routine may look like this: joint warm-up Surya Namaskar (12 cycles). Please listen to your body while performing and don't forget about ...


2

There is a crazy amount of ‘information’ on the internet about different physical syndromes and rehab techniques. Likewise, physical therapy is big business. Instead, I think you could do gentle exercise that strengthens your body indirectly. Walking is good—particularly walking on uneven terrain (e.g. in a forest). Swimming is also good. Bodyweight squats ...


2

If you are rolling over your toes for instance in between cobra/up- dog and downward facing dog, and your skin is not too think on the upper parts of the feet/toes, this may happen. What you can do is to not roll over your feet, but instead mindfully flip the feet. On the other hand in cobra/up- dog you're pressing the top of the feet down the mat... Try ...


1

Injuries can certainly hinder our training routine, but endurance is something you can continue to practice! Mental endurance can be just as important as physical endurance, and they tend to work hand-in-hand. Our mental fortitude contributes to our ability to withstand prolonged physical effort. Given your injury is currently physically limiting, it is a ...


1

Yoga, daily warm-ups/stretching, and careful strength training focused on full ranges of motion have been my most beneficial solo practices for me to prevent, notice, and fix minor mobility issues like tightness or weakness. Self myofascial release has been helpful in specific scenarios but not as consistently as those three. Of course external experts (...


1

As an on-water rower, I am partial to rowing on an erg for my aerobic work. Assuming you get permission from a physical therapist, using an erg can supplement your training safely and efficiently. A proper rowing technique on the erg consists of “legs, back, arms” (“catch, drive, release”) in that order. This movement allows a total body workout. The ...


1

Assuming arthritis or osteoporosis, etc isn't an issue to begin with.. and assuming each exercise is done safety without going too fast, etc.. Generally, core exercises that involve a lot of flexion can cause long-term injury since the spine is not suppose to flex but resist flexion.. although I've never seen anyone with an acute injury doing crunchds, it ...


1

Go see an orthopaedic specialist, maybe something is wrong with your feet. Choose one who is making shoes and inlays and who is equiped for walk analysis and used to treat athletes. I have splayfeet and knew it too late, resulting in unrecoverable damage of the knees.


1

There could be multiple things to look at, but to answer your question, yes.. everyone exercising needs to take a break. The more experienced you are, the more often you take breaks. Typically this "deload" is 9 to 14 days and can include your rest days so that it just feels like a week off. Generally this is done every 6 to 8 weeks. After a deload, it's not ...


1

There seem to be a number of interpretations of the term Greasing the Groove floating around, but the term might be characterised by the fact that (1) lifting is sub-maximal, and (2) not performed to failure. So although performing a warm-up might optimise our strength for a lift, it is reasonable to suggest that for this method it is unnecessary, since we ...


1

One method is doing the movement with partial rom, for example, do a tiny rom pullup, then gradually increase the rom until you do 5 normal pullups


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