6

True interval training is short bursts of very high intensity, followed by enough rest to allow you to complete the next interval at the target pace. Once you cannot meet the required time, you should stop the intervals for the day (Even if you have more to do). The purpose behind interval training in running is to increase your top speed. For example, say ...


5

The amount of calories you burn in a given time depends on how much actual physical work you do in that time, not on what type of exercise you do or how fast you do it. When on hypocaloric diet, you can lose some muscle mass during endurance training, but less likely during resistance exercise (Table 1, PubMed, 2017). High-protein diet can help you prevent ...


4

Do you own a smartphone/tablet? If it's available then get yourself an app for Tabata/HIIT. I personally use „Bodyweight Training by Mark Lauren“ (also available as book), which is progressive, customizeable and has a ton of exercises (and video descriptions for the iPad). A timer for tabata and a sample HIIT workout is also built-in. I think you get the ...


4

I can see why this sounds confusing, but most runners record there training in miles or kilometres per week. So if you were to take 10-15% of your weeks running miles, I would think that's what it means. However, if your target is to improve your 10k, you may be better to do 10-15% high intensity running. Personally, I would think this will be more ...


4

There is a concept known as "training stress". When you put stress on your system and then give your body time to recover, you will improve. When you started, it was easy for you to put stress on your system, but over time, your body adapted, and now you only put enough stress on your system to stay where you are. The solution is to change up what you are ...


4

The heart rate monitor is losing track of your heart rate. I suggest to look at the operating instructions to try and help it function correctly, and check the battery since it may be running low or sweat might be getting into it. Also suggest to look into other devices. I use a chest strap to get a good consistent result. Sometimes I see something like this ...


4

Jason is correct in that the spikes into the 190's are probably artifacts and errors due to poor readings from the monitor. However, also on longer efforts, you may be seeing the effects of cardiac drift. As you exercise, your body needs more blood to bring oxygen to the muscles and take away waste material. The heart naturally starts working harder to ...


3

This clearly depends on which definitions you're referring to as there may be several different ways to interpret these terms. I refer to how Jack Daniels defines these terms in his 'Running Formula' (with speaking about interval and repetition pace, see wikipedia): Intervals are meant to stress the VO2max and raise the maximum oxygen uptake capacity. In ...


3

It sounds like overall you're on the right track. I'm a marathon runner myself and I was actually pretty taken aback a few weeks ago when I interviewed an Ironman coach and he spoke about the importance of 80/20 training (something I've never actually done)… yet I've run a marathon is 3:13. Your marathon time will be as good as your training, nutrition, ...


3

Overtraining is different for every person first of all. Although to answer your question I believe you won't be Overtraining that way. If you are looking for a serious workout routine to start with I can recommend the following which is free: http://freebodybuildingworkoutprogram.com/thtdownload/ I do it myself and so far I enjoy doing it. The ...


3

This article does, in a long way, answer your question: The Marathon Myth: High intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T.) vs. Long Duration Training (L.D.T.) I have written several FitBit Articles this year detailing the efficacy of High Intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T. training). H.I.I.T. has been shown to develop much higher levels of cardiovascular ...


3

To answer your question, you must define what is the objective of the workout you are performing. Depending on the objective, you can define yourself what you should be doing between series. Active recovery between series helps your body to learn to clear by-products while fatigued. Active recovery means a running pace that allows you to recover to such a ...


2

You could just do burpees, pushups, situps, air squats, etc. with various rep schemes (e.g., 5 rounds of 10 pushups, 25 situps, 30 airsquats for time, or as many rounds as possible in 20 minutes of 20 burpees, 100 unders with a jump-rope, 15 v-ups). Here's a great guide for no-equipment HIIT workouts: http://reebokcrossfitone.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/...


2

Well that depends on what your goal is. Your intervals should be less than whatever your goal distance is - perhaps 50-75% of whatever the goal is. You want the pace of the intervals to be consistent throughout the workout. The first ones will be easy but the last ones will be hard. As you get better, you want to reduce the rest time between intervals - or ...


2

What are your goals? My experience (anecdotal and exercise physiology knowledge) says that for more broad ranging adaptions, 4-6 minute intervals are superior to very short term (i.e. 20 seconds). 6 minute intervals (at the highest relative intensities you would be able to maintain) largely stimulate both anaerobic (first 2-3 min) and aerobic pathways (...


2

I believe you are looking to break down a 10km run into intervals that are suitable for helping you develop anerobic fitness for competing. Hopefully you understand that to improve at X activity, the common advice is to DO X activity A LOT. However, progression through intervals can be beneficial for a variety of reasons. The Main types I am aware of: Heart ...


2

In order to increase muscle mass, your body must be forced to adapt. A state of balance is called homeostasis. The essence for inducing a strength and/or hypertrophy increase requires disrupting homeostasis. The way we do this with strength training is by lifting weights in a manner that exceeds what our body is adapted to. There's a number of ways to do ...


2

First, you really need some long runs under your belt to know you are ready for 42k. If you feel you can do you 10K x 3 at 44 minutes then I would say YES to the 3:45. It sounds like your speed is there but you are not sure about distance. I would recommend adding a Saturday long run to what you are already doing. Your runs will range from 17k-35k and ...


2

"Is adding some supplementation "just in case" a good idea? If so, how much should I add?" "Can the conditioning training interfere with my body recomposition program, which is based on eating pattern changes?" "Can this program hinder my efforts to improve my endurance/condition?" The answer to all these questions is... yes! To understand why, ill answer ...


2

You should run a calculation to determine your Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE). This calculation will estimate how many calories you need every day in order to maintain weight, and thus going over will result in your weight increasing while going under will result in your weight decreasing. A TDEE Calculation works by factoring in your activity level ...


1

You can probably choose any distance from 200m to 5000m, use a factor such that the total distance at target pace is somewhere between 2k and 10k and use ca. half the distance as recovery and you have a list of common interval workouts. 5k runners do in general more of the shorter ones while marathon runners may even do something like 3x5k at marathon pace. ...


1

I think the most fitting thing would be Zwift. You’d need a bike and a smart trainer to set it up, which could be cost prohibitive, but it offers all the things you are asking for. You can join races, do FTP training, and get instant feedback on your workout. I think Zwift is now available with certain treadmills as well, but I haven’t looked into it.


1

To just clarify the weight gaining side when you stop walking and gym, I can say that I am not surprised and it is not strange, given the amount of carbohydrate you take in and proteins. The body receives all of that and it will spike your insulin very high, the presence of insulin in the bloodstream will reduce glucose but will also open the cells and let ...


1

there are a few points to be answered on your comments above. I will ty to answer one by one over a period of time. The first point is about the calories intake and % of what you eat. First of all I should ask how old you are and how much you weight, however, given the calories you tell me you consume, I can tell you that they are way too much, you do not ...


1

It is very good that you do a full body workout, I am doing that and it works well. To maximize each workout, especially if someone have been doing this for a while and the body is somewhat used to the routine, you need to train every other day. This give you plenty of time to recover, which is needed, as you grow when you rest and sleep, especially for ...


1

Here's some theory for you. You get better when you put stress on your system. Intervals have the potential to put a lot of stress on your system, and therefore give you lots of improvement. However, they only work if you can work really hard at them, and you can only do that if you are very well rested. If you do intervals when you are not well rested, ...


1

If you’ve got steps in your house/apartment, you can duplicate those exercises easily. In fact, stairs can be used for a variety of exercises. For starters, try Stair Tricep Dips with Triceps press on the stairs. You can substitute step ups on the stairs for your leg work. Additionally, if you can get a hold of an exercise ball, or, aerobic step, those ...


1

I can recommend diamond push-ups or bodyweight tricep extensions both of them in combination with doing wide grip push ups where you go close to the ground and swing from the left to the right without pushing yourself up.


1

This question requires a general answer since the two types of training, as they are, can have many variations in training parameters. By doing circuit training you can complete the training session in a shorter time while maintaining the intensity: by working out another muscle group while the first one rests you effectively shorten the time spent working ...


1

The two problems I had with such an approach were 1) the difficulty in properly warming up for each session and 2) a slight increase managing workload. Split workouts mean that you either spend a lot of time warming up for each separate session, or you don't fully warm up sometimes. It's easy to skip a full warm-up in such a situation, but it's still a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible