5

What you want to do is use Prilepin tables, which specify how many sets of which duration you should hold for optimal (or near optimal) progress. The goal is always to have about 60 seconds total hold time; once you can do this in a single set it is time to progress to a harder variation (otherwise, you are no longer doing strength work). In the case of a ...


4

The reason you are stronger in isometrics is simply because less is being asked of the muscle fibers. Instead of them going from a fully stretched position to a fully contracted position (full range of motion), the muscle fibers are simply maintaining a contracted state. On top of ignoring strength curves, you also ignore the strength that it takes to ...


4

Isometric versus Concentric Training Each kind of training produces the greatest improvement when strength tests used are similar to those of training. Most improvements are observed when the test routine matches the training routine. Exercise-type specificity is supported. Improvement in functional (sporting) performance is the most practical criterion ...


4

To use the plank to get stronger, you should plank for strenuous but submaximal times. In your case that would probably be sets of about 20 seconds, using multiple sets (e.g. 3-6) and resting briefly (e.g. 15 to 90 seconds) between sets. Aim for a reliable 40-second hold in a month or two. I agree with Arthlete that the only option that looks really ...


4

First of all why do you focus only on the plank to maximize the holding time? You can work other exercises that are going to help you with your plank. your whole body is involved in the plank - shoulders, back, legs, abs. Figure out which part of the body dies first and try to strengthen it. Of course this is not a matter of strength as it is more a matter ...


3

What you are saying is correct in principle: we are able to support greater loads isometrically than we are able to move concentrically. However, the degree of the difference is not as pronounced as you remember. Isometric strength is typically in the order of 10 per cent greater than concentric strength. That is, if we can bench press 100 kilograms (220 lbs)...


2

Do isometric exercises decrease flexibility? Assuming you mean ROM when you refer to “flexibility”, from the studies I’ve read, isometric exercises do not decrease flexibility. In the International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy (Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2012 Feb; 7(1): 109–119.), a recent article, Current Concepts in Muscle Stretching for Exercise and ...


2

Each type of exercise has its advantages and limitations which is why specificity of exercise is a good guide. Given specificity of exercise, if your goal is to: increase my ability to hold heavy bags of groceries for a long time, then holding heavy bags of groceries for progressively long periods of time would be your most direct path. This not only ...


1

What you're referring to is overcoming isometrics or moving an immovable weight. This is a great method to add to the end of a set.. for instance after doing a set of a deadlift, then try to move the rusty barbell for 5 seconds. As a hypertrophy move.. no. It be like doing an incomplete 1 rep power move. It's a great tool to add to the basics but not stand ...


1

I don't believe that doing the exercises in the given video with weights is good at all. These are supposed to be done without weights. Weight loading should be done in the exercises that we naturally do, such as: horizontal / vertical push pull, hinge, and squat. Rotating your shoulders with a weight in your hand is not beneficial. We should not forget that ...


1

Isometric exercise aka 'isometrics' are a type of strength training in which the joint angle and muscle length do not change during contraction (compared to concentric or eccentric contractions, called dynamic/isotonic movements). Isometrics are done in static positions, rather than being dynamic through a range of motion. The Plank is one of the most ...


1

I'll try to answer this another way, and state that full range of motion (ROM) exercises do indeed increase flexibility. This is primarily due to the viscoelastic response, where the muscle and connective tissue is pulled taught like a rubber band. I discussed this a bit on an answer about why squats are harder than deadlifts, the viscoelastic component ...


1

The shorter answer is NO. Dumbbells, by design, exercise only an arm. Barbells, by design, exercise both arms. Since deadlift is a 2-arm exercise, it cannot be completely and effectively done by dumbbells. This doesn't indicate that you cannot use dumbbells; you can use the same dumbbells for various exercises. And you can even use it for deadlift-like ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible