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13

Your question was addressed in this randomized control trial that compared the results of two test groups that worked out 5 days per week: one group did long bouts of exercise (20-40 min per day) while the other did short bouts of exercise (multiple 10 min bouts per day). The biggest takeaway from the study was that people were more likely to train when ...


10

Stick to what is working for you. If you cannot run everyday, but OK with running on alternate days, do that. Unless there is some deadline due to competition, there is no point in over-stressing yourself. I am not a big runner myself and used be even worse, but I learned that persistence leads to good results and persistence is not possible if you do not ...


6

I have ectomorph body-type The somatotypes is a very old theory, and one that has been under a lot of scrutiny in the actual scientific environments. It is deemed suggestive, but not conclusive. But that said, I understand what you mean when you say you are ectomorph, so if nothing else, at least it serves as a starting point for this conversation. ...


4

Hamstrings. When you're running on a level treadmill, you're essentially hoping up and down on a moving belt. When running outside, you're also pushing yourself forward (hip extension), which recruits the hamstrings more. You can overcome this by increasing the incline on the treadmill, but it's still a difference that I didn't see mentioned here.


4

I think you're over thinking this. If you personally feel like you need to have something because you feel lightheaded when you've previously jogged on an empty stomach you should definitely have something to eat prior to exercise. Likewise if you've felt worse eating before a jog, then don't eat. Any option you choose won't matter for a 30 minute jog. If ...


4

Calories used during jogging varies greatly based on the incline and your body statistics. The "average male" jogging for 30 minutes burns about 250 calories. There are around 15 calories in a teaspoon of sugar. You have about 6 teaspoons maximum per day, totaling 90 calories. Am I doing enough in jogging so as to compensate my sugar consumption? ...


4

It sounds like you might be dealing with Exercise-induced Urticaria: Exercise-induced urticaria is a condition that causes hives and other allergic symptoms. It can occur during or after exercise. Hives or "welts" are usually raised, flat bumps on the skin that are more red around the edge than in the middle. Hives may also look like red spots, blotches ...


4

If you are new to jogging just breathe naturally through your mouth. It's the best way to get oxygen in and CO2 out. Wait until your cardiovascular system get conditioned to try the nose/mouth technique


4

Well, yes this improves your general health. You don't need to work out every day to be a healthy person. The only reason many people work out is because a lot of people have jobs in which they sit in an office all day. To make up for the lack of movement we get throughout the day, we go to a gym to work out, or go running or cycling. A few thousand years a ...


4

From my personal experience, I can say that stretching is required neither before nor after the treadmill running workouts, unless you are planning to sprint at high speeds there, which I do not recommend at all. 5 mins of walking before and after worked fine for me. What you will need if you want to run comfortably in a treadmill is a fan to blow air onto ...


4

Like in a lot of exercise and diet research it is difficult to find a clear-cut answer and you may even find contradictory results. Your question involves not one but two changes: Food consumption after or before exercise. Shorter exercise at a higher intensity versus longer exercise at a lower intensity. For number 1 there is already plenty of discussion ...


3

If you can't run 10k without stopping, then you are either running too far, or too fast for your current fitness. I would recommend a program created by a cross country coach named Barry Pollack, dubbed the 3:2:1 program. In this, you have 6 runs per week, 3 short, 2 medium and one long. Your medium run is double your short runs, and your long run is 3x ...


3

TL;DR Don't start with 4K right away; Don't run in your work clothes. I started running about a year ago and jog part of my commute on some days, so I guess my experience might be helpful. Get started on something you can control nicely. Although you can ride a bike for quite some distance, running is just different. So I'd recommend running around the ...


3

Your hamstrings are connected to your lower back muscles. Many times tight hamstrings can cause lower back pain because they force the lower back muscles to stretch. The answer isn't to stretch the hamstrings before - that can cause more harm than good. Stretching after you are hurt doesn't help either. The key is to wait for after the recovery and ...


3

Sounds possible that you have shin splits http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shin_splints They will go away with some time off. This is common with individuals who are new to the level of training that are taking on. My recommendation is to rest for 3 days and start again (rest means you don't have to stop training, just don't do what you have been) As ...


3

The bottom line is going to be whichever activity you enjoy more, you will end up doing more. That being said, here are some comparisons of cycling versus running. Time: You will get more out of running for the time spent. You work harder in running, so you burn more calories for about the same amount of time spent (For the same effort level. If you really ...


3

A doctor once recommended to abstain from all traumatic sports because of danger of retinal detachment, however this would limit the quality of my life. Having a detached retina will affect the quality of your life more. It may be wise to have an eye exam and get clarification from your eye doctor as to whether or not you are at risk. If you are at risk, ...


3

It could be something more complicated, but generally I'll just say that running hurts, especially when you're just starting or increasing your mileage. I would recommend following a training program like couch-to-5k. With something like that, the distance increase and schedule will be regulated. If you have excessive problems with pain or handling the ...


3

Running for 10 minutes straight is fine for a beginner. You can easily build on that (provided of course you had a physician check that there's nothing wrong with Your joints, bones or muscles). Run for 8 minutes then walk for 2 to 3 minutes. No problem to walk longer if you need longer to get back your breath. Run 6 minutes. Walk again. Run 5 minutes. Go ...


3

I recommend Strava. It lets you find segments (trails) in your area using your GPS, and they are created and curated by the community, but also moderated by... well, moderators. It lets you look at segments by length, whether it's flat or hilly, and the level of inclination/steepness. I assume that's what you mean by "difficulty"? It keeps track of your ...


3

You remove fat from your body by using more calories than you put in. Jogging for 20 mins burns around 200 calories (ish). Most people need 2200 calories per day. Therefore, you cannot out-exercise a bad diet. If you want to lose weight then focus on diet instead of micromanaging the gym activity; doing that will lead you to be more successful. I looked at ...


3

The same way you would have built up your first 5k jog, using intervals. 'Jogging' would be your 5k-in-35-min pace 'Running' would be your 5k-in-20-min pace Start with a 4min jog, 1min run, 4min jog, 1 min run...etc. (repeat until you complete the 5k) Once that is comfortable then increase the run time by 1 minute and/or decrease the jog time by 1 minute....


3

I love to run based on BPM. I find that my feet tend to sync with whatever I am listening to anyhow. Spotify I am currently playing around with Spotify. They have a feature (under Browse... Running) in the mobile app to use a running playlist and when you fire it up it asks you to start running and they will detect your cadence or you can skip that and ...


3

The Gait Cycle Gait essentially is a transition between repeated loss of balance and recovery. During movement there is a cyclic transfer between potential and kinetic energy which will minimize the energy cost of walking. Efficient movement involves preserving and transferring the greatest amount of energy (your momentum) to help propel you forward ...


3

Try some wrist and or ankle weights - or even a weight vest depending on the climate. You aren't quite going to get the same effect as if you were moving faster but you are going to be making it more effort for a given speed.


2

I do "both." That is, I eat a piece of chocolate (candy, cake, or milkshake) for "quick" energy before jogging. Then a "real" breakfast after I've finished my workout.


2

Simple answer: exercise before, if you want to loose weight. The New York Times has some articles citing research about this subject The article "What is the best time of day to exercise, if my goal is weight loss?", from 2015. Cites a Belgian study where 3 groups of young men were asked to eat 30% more daily calories. First group did no exercise, ...


2

If you run, you will get a stronger forefoot, your hip flexors are called into play much more, your quads and hamstrings both have a very active role, as well as your calve muscles. You must swing your arms and bring your core into the motion. There is a huge emphasis on landing and pushing off, your shoes are important, as well as the gait of your foot, ...


2

In general, good PTs tend to distinguish between two kinds of people. Some clients will be extremely sensitive to pain. These folks will, in general, benefit from being told to exercise even when it hurts a bit, as it will prevent muscle loss &c. Other clients will be significantly less sensitive to pain (case in point, I once finished a 10mi cross-...


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