10

No, explosive movements do not necessarily lead to injury. Performed correctly after a period of acclimatization, explosive movements are quite safe. The recommendation to be slow, deliberate, and under control at all times is meant for the general population. Most people are weak, prone to injury, and unlikely to seek capable instruction in explosive ...


7

Performing a proper two-hand kettlebell swing is a whole-body workout as opposed to isolating single muscles. However, the main muscles that go into swinging a bell are glutes, hamstrings, lower back + abs (core). What you should aim for in a swing is to send your hips back (similar to deadlift form) with the bell, and then drive your hips forward to get ...


7

Congratulations, you found the secret muscle group, technically known as the "everything". Being slightly more serious, loaded carries are one of the best exercises you can do to improve strength, muscle mass and general athleticism (according to Dan John) You're right in that your core will be worked, but probably a lot more than you'd imagine. If you ...


6

Yes, with proper form it's one of the few exercises that provide both "aerobic capacity development" and offers a "strength training effect". These findings have also been backed by the American College of Sports Medicine. Update: Link #4 is actually a counter argument supporting treadmill over KB aerobic training. Also found 2 more supporting KB ...


5

Sure you can, but why would you want to? There is no benefit to slapping the kettlebell in mid-air. If you're new to kettlebells, stick with the tried and true routines.


4

Regarding the 800lb deadlift, I think that's the realm of major league baseball pitchers throwing 100+ mph fast balls. In both cases, those folks are pushing the upper limits of their physical capacity. Catching injuries, pushing super hard, and only able to sustain it for a period of their lives. That's a far cry from what most people consider "fitness" to ...


4

Your questions 1) Is there a "typical use" for kettlebells? Yes. Kettlebells are most commonly used to mimic olympic style lifts. There are some unique movements and many advanced athletes use kettlebells for conditioning drills. If you are really interested in this than you can look around your area for Kettlebell training classes or seminars. ...


4

Kettlebells can be great assistance work in the world of strength training, so they should be placed after the main lifts in your routine. Use them for mobility: halos and windmills. For the windmills, you are looking for light weights to help strengthen the rotator cuff muscles. Use them for conditioning: swings, cleans, and snatches are good conditioning ...


4

More often than not, if you want to work on form, you should decrease the weight. If your form breaks, it does so when the load is high. Naturally there are exceptions to this rule, as there are to any rule, but if you've found an exercise where heavy weights force you into strict form, you've found a magical exercise. That said, make sure you know good and ...


3

As you noted: One big drawback of kettlebell is clearly the difficulty in doing progressive overloads. This is easier with the dumbbell(s). In order to continue to train for greater strength, you must apply progressively-greater stresses to your muscles. Exercises with plate-loaded barbells are ideal for this purpose, as you probably know. Without ...


3

You say you are only looking for general fitness and not interested in strength, but then you say you are looking for a decent strength solution. To me, that is a bit contradictory, I am not saying you need to turn into a meathead in order to strength train, but it does require a certain amount of commitment and effort. I get it, you don't want to spend all ...


2

Just for a little reference: Dan John has a programm/blog post kinda thing named 10000 kettlebell swings. In this you perform 500 swings a day 4 times per week (main and only workout) and it contains sets of 50 swings. I tried this with a 24kg kettlebell and can honestly say it is something special. For me personally it puts things in perspectif; I don't ...


2

30 kettlebell swings is not enough exercise to see major improvement. You need a longer workout. Stay with your current kettlebell, but do more exercises and more sets. You could do 30 swings, then rest a couple minutes, then do another set of 30 swings, and continue until you've done 3 or 5 sets. Some sets of overhead presses would be a good idea, as would ...


2

I do only swings , which is the only exercise I do not feel boring You may want to consider something like the kettlebell snatch, or the kettlebell clean and press (or both), neither of which many people would describe as boring. Some of my favorite kettlebell workouts consist of: Swing (two hand) Snatch Clean and press Turkish getup DB (with a KB) ...


2

It would change the movement completely. like using dumbbell vs barbell. One handed would bring in more little stabilizing muscles and it would allow more development of your weaker side. While 2H would be better to develop base strength as you have more control.


2

First, let's get some terminology out of the way. In order to be a kettlebell, I would require the tool to be one solid piece of metal. Adjustable kettlebell substitutes are apparently called "T-handles" instead. The model pictured above has an actual handle, whereas homemade versions may just be designed to grab on to a straight stick of pipe. They work for ...


2

Simply obtain a heart rate monitor and estimate the relative VO2 figures per: Is it possible to measure calorie burn from heart rate alone?, and from the VO2 figure the calories.


2

Try having a look at Pavel's Simple and Sinister program (can't remember if it's free or not). Essentially, it's a swing and Turkish get up based program that uses goblet squats as part of the warm up. From memory, the rest periods are based on how you feel, so if you get through your first set of swings and only feel lightly out of breath, then go do the ...


2

I applaud your strength increases! But, I fail to see how kettlebell swings could reduce anterior pelvic tilt or shoulder-rounding. Actually, I can imagine how KB swings might exacerbate both of those postural tendencies. In general, posture is unconscious. One of the first steps to changing posture is developing awareness of posture. As you increase ...


2

You want to look at rowing motions (horizontal pulling) in all it's forms rather than vertical. So... Bent over rows Gorilla rows Inverted rows (using the dip frames, if they're tall enough) You might also find that you get a surprising amount of upper back work from things like dips (if you pause at the top and keep a big chest), kettlebell swings (lats ...


1

Chest: push ups - a lot of variants butterflies with dumbbells lying on the ground pullover with dumbbell (need some bench or chair) and this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byxD_y2e_L8 Back: one arm dumbbell rows pullover sumo deadlifts with kettlebell lying back extension shoulders shrugs dumbbells Shoulders: overhead press front raise bent-over ...


1

You can do pullovers with kettlebell: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rV1aBNC2Bg I have seen guys doing pullovers with 32+kg KB. Also you can buy and use ab wheel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqiTPdK1c_I As was mentioned before, you can do any kind of rows with KB (there are hundreds of them). And lastly, bsacially any exercise with KB done with ...


1

(I'm using the SFG Kettlebell Swing for this answer, other swings are also available) Kind of. In a good swing, you first hike the bell between your legs, using maximal hip bend and bending your legs only enough to allow the bell to pass between your thighs (as Dan John is fond of saying, attack the zipper). You then effectively "stomp" your feet, tensing ...


1

You can use an adjustable dumbbell (up to 100lbs or more) and then do unilateral exercises with it. One legged SLDL, Bulgarian split -or goblet- squats, OHP, and one arm row. With those exercises you cover the most important movement patterns (except vertical pulling, you need a pullup bar for that one but its not necessary)


1

Self-verification of a trainee's movement execution may be difficult or nearly impossible, especially if that trainee is unathletic. If a coach is absent then the next best -- though not necessarily sufficient -- option available to the trainee is self-made videos of the movement, reviewed immediately thereafter (for example, after a set of deadlifts). ...


1

I think the deadlift is easier than the kb swing because a deadlift is rather static. You get in the right neutral back position and then maintain it as you lift. The kb swing is a dynamic / ballistic movement similar to a barbell clean or a baseball throw: it's hard to stop in the middle and correct something. People tend to learn dynamic movements in ...


1

There is likely some CNS benefit to the number of repetitions (so be sure you are using proper form) Since intensity is relative low from a strength standpoint is seems like a strength/cardio hybrid workout My personal primary purpose for the farmers walk is to improve my grip strength for deadlifts. If that is your goal too then consider increasing weight ...


1

Your original statement is not correct. Deadlifts are compound exercises that, when completed, activate a large group of muscles [1]. The grip strength (finger flexors) and the lower back (erector spinae) work isometrically to keep the bar held in the hands and to keep the spine from rounding. The gluteus maximus and hamstrings work to extend the hip ...


1

That's it. Typically a good rule of thumb is to breath out when the weight is traveling against gravity.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible