13

As you've discovered, the 10% rule isn't really applicable to someone who is completely new to running. It requires that you already have an established weekly running volume that you can tolerate, so it's really only for already established runners. As a beginner, you'd be better off starting with a dedicated beginner program, such as Couch to 5k, which can ...


7

As mentioned in yisrael's answer and Aequitas' comment, you're gonna need to track your calorie intake. Combining a caloric deficit by diet with exercise is going to be a lot easier than just doing one. Without exercise you may find that eating little enough for the deficit can leave you too hungry or make it hard to resist sneaking in some extra food, while ...


6

There is a certain technique of foot strike that runners use for distance running, and that's known as midfoot striking. Your issue, commonly known as runner's knee, seems to be likely from the biomechanical issue discussed in this article. In essence, if your footfalls are striking hard on the heel, then the entire shock of the impact is traveling ...


6

There certainly is a common error people seem to be making based on what I have read in this article: Improper sequencing. Front squats are deceiving because while it's a primarily knee-dominant movement pattern, you still want to initiate the movement from the hips first and push your butt back before breaking from the knees. It's an almost ...


5

If there was no pain before you started running, you're probably overdoing it. A mile and a half really isn't much, and your cardio ability might be there, but your soft/connective-tissue ability might not be there. That stuff takes a long time to recover and strengthen. Also, if you've never run before, your musculature is probably wacko and imbalanced. ...


4

In order to lose weight you need to be in a caloric deficit; meaning you expend more energy from the combination of your daily activity plus exercise than you eat. If you are not tracking both your intake and your output, you will have no way of knowing if you are doing 'enough' to lose weight. There are many calculators online that can assist you with ...


3

You basically have two questions here. First, is stair-climbing good for weight loss? Honestly, not much. This document calculates about .17 calories burned per step going up and .05 going down. If you assume that you're taking 1 step every second and continuously doing so for an hour, that's about 1800 steps up and 1800 steps down. That comes out to about ...


3

There is alot of good info about running injuries and ITB syndrome, so I'll try to highlight some of the answers that will help to answer your question: Regarding Warm-up: @Ryan gives a good running warm up with video links in answering this question: Best warm up for running. Generally dynamic exercises are recommended prior to the workout. Static ...


3

I wish I could always have perfect form but this isn't possible, say, on the last 2 reps of my last heavy set. I keep proper form >90% of the time. I think the proper answer to this question is to do everything in your power possible to maintain proper form at > 99.9% of the time. If that means dropping the weight, then do so. Gutting out those last few ...


3

Do not do any self-diagnosis. Consult a musculoskeletal specialist and get yourself diagnosed. Never assume anything, as similar symptoms may be because of different reasons.If given proper attention at the right time, any issue can be fixed.


3

I'm going to agree with whoever suggested swimming to you in the past. The water provides resistance, and the distance provides the heartrate. In effect, it's both a strength exercise, and a cardiovascular exercise. In the end though, fat burning is most effectively done in the kitchen, as whatever calories you burn in an hour on a treadmill, can be undone ...


2

I would look at your diet and especially your natural collagen production. This for me was an issue I had with perthes disease. Eating high nutrient dense foods really help, especially at high intense sports like squash where you need to make sure your body is producing plenty of grease / synovial fluids at other to ensure efficient working of joints and ...


2

I have played around with this subject too, especially when I run in my huarache sandals. They slap the ground quite loudly and you can hear me coming a mile away. I read a good tip to combat this problem. When you're running, try to imagine that you are running on delicate rice paper. Land as if you're trying your best not to tear the paper - run softly, no ...


2

What you're going through sounds similar to an experience that I had. I was a college athlete, I played basketball and tennis every day of the week and lifted multiple times a week. I had very bad pain in both of my knees and it was due to tendonitis above and below the knee cap. I was treated for this but the pain consisted. I finally went in and got my ...


2

There's always going to be benefit from any movement (you're using SOME muscle, so SOME muscle will get trained), but of course, by limiting the range of motion (ROM), you're also limiting the effect. But it's likely ill advised to do any squats or lunges while your knee is being repaired.


2

The solution is in your question. You have pain only when you lose form, so the solution is obviously keeping good form. If you lose form towards the end than you are simply not concentrating, I don't believe it is muscular. Before the last sets take a slightly longer break (get your pulse down), then focus, and lift. Also, stop looking at the hot chicks! (...


2

The knee is a hinge joint that will never respond well to rotational forces. Gray Cook's joint-by-joint approach to training states that lack of stability in the knee is usually caused by lack of mobility in the ankle. Michael Boyle's 8 Essential Mobility Drills suggests placing your toe four inches from a wall, keeping your heel on the floor, and rocking ...


2

The knee is very complex and it can be difficult to say what is good/bad for yours specifically. What is good/bad entirely depends on your condition and strength level. To make matters worse, even physios can disagree (depending on where and when they learnt, and how much they keep up with their science). For example, I've been told by some doctors and ...


2

Everyone's hips are slightly different. Most people turn their toes out to ensure that their knee tracks over their toes. That said, squat stances can vary massively depending on type and sport: Powerlifting vs Olympic and the myriad of squat types: Safety Bar, Back Squat, Front Squat, Overhead Squat, Sissy Squat, Zercher Squat, Box Squat, High Bar, Low bar.....


2

Barbell back squats are probably the most effective exercise for strengthening everything south of your belt line. Everything else is a half measure or more dangerous. If there was a more effective way to build lower body strength it would be used by professional athletes instead of squats. I'm not sure what your existing knee injury is and what it would ...


2

I prefer using an indoor rowing machine. Rowing machines allow for a complete body workout and are relatively low impact on the knees. You can easily set the machine to provide a low or high impact workout based on your goals. I, personally, have had knee problems in the past and have not found the rower to cause any added stress on the knees. However, ...


2

Please consider quitting seated leg presses and other machine-based movements. These can bias your exertion toward quad-dominance, which may exacerbate imbalances in forces in your knees. Instead, do low-bar back squats to proper depth (which is not maximum/"ass-to-grass" depth). Squats will strengthen both your posterior chain (hamstrings, glutes) and ...


2

Pain comes from somewhere. You have to understand (and get someone to help you understand) what is causing the pain. Is it something in the ligaments ? Muscles ? Bones ? Is it a muscle imbalance ? Is it simply being unused to exercising ? Should you first go for low impact (e.g. bike) exercises before switching to running ? Should you concurrently strengthen ...


2

Unfortunately, we can't tell you the reason for your knee pain. It may be physical, it may be equipment (poor fitting/worn out shoes, etc) or something else. I would recommend getting with a trainer and/or physical therapist to help figure out the cause. There are many exercises you can do that don't put that kind of stress on the knee, however. Swimming is ...


1

It depends on your knee problems. If you are able to do squats as Larissa says then great. I know people who would be able to do squats, but would suffer for at least a week after. I would suggest slow controlled step overs, to start to build the vastus medius muscle, which will help take the pressure off of the knee. Step overs. Take a bench. Step ...


1

I have a torn ACL and after wearing the Adidas Bostons, my knees have felt tons better. Note that I believe that I own 2013 versions. I've also worn Adidas's supernovas and they were quite comfortable (but a bit heavier, not by much)


1

Although elliptical machine can simulate running, it is very different than actual running. It's really good to recover from an injury and a great way to get the legs back in shape but to be able to run, you have to start running. In my opinion, you can try the couch-potato to 5K run since it's easy and builds your running abilities quite fast. And ...


1

What helped for me were two things: Go a little deeper on the squats (just below parallel). It tends to relieve the pressure on the knees. Take longer rests between sets. I used to rest about 30 sec. to 1 minute between sets, but after having some pain in my knees I took 2-3 minutes of rest between sets & noticed to experience less pain. And most ...


1

There is only anecdotal evidence to support the claim that taking supplements can help with joint pain. It appears to work for some people, and, not for others. There is, as yet, no scientific proof it works. As for exercises, I've had the unfortunate experience to rehab a torn ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament). As part of that rehab, I was instructed by ...


1

LarissaGodzilla, Reading and anecdotal experiences have shown that weight squatting helps with knee pains. While i can't give a resource-backed answer at the moment, my theory is that: Squatting improves the strength of your body, including your thighs, overall legs, and body. Because the legs are now stronger, the muscles are more able to sustain the ...


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