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13

As you've discovered, the 10% rule isn't really applicable to someone who is completely new to running. It requires that you already have an established weekly running volume that you can tolerate, so it's really only for already established runners. As a beginner, you'd be better off starting with a dedicated beginner program, such as Couch to 5k, which can ...


6

A lot of people have this problem, and it's usually caused by short tendons on the back of your ankle. I forget the name... Achilles? Anyway, there are plently of things you can try in order to fix this, and yes, the weight is supposed to drive into the ground through your heels. Method 1 One way, is to elevate your heels, by placing them on top of plates....


4

Both the gastronemius and the hamstrings cross the back of the knee joint, so both can be tight from sitting 10 hours per day. Muscles can tighten, but the fascia can also become stuck and stop gliding well. Hydration is important for fascial mobility. Here are some suggestions: Gastroc - The simple wall stretch will target the muscle. Make sure to align ...


4

I transfer a lot of weight to the toes while moving up My fix for this is to concentrate on pushing through my heels. If there are no physiological barriers then this should be enough. One way I help concentrate on pushing through my heels is to pick up my big toes and keep them elevated for the entire set. I stand and squat normally, but my big toes stay ...


4

Running properly isn’t bad for your knees, but running in bad form certainly can be. As a matured human being, you should train like a matured human being. It doesn’t matter what age or sex you are, the only factors that might change the way you train are things like injuries, sickness, disabilities, etc (goals too). I read an article once that spoke of how ...


4

Many people experience more aches and pains as they age. However, it's not a guarantee. Knees don't just 'go bad' most of the time and pain doesn't automatically mean there is damage either. Sure there are some disorders like osgood schlatters and osteoarthritis and so on and so forth, but even for these staying active usually helps dramatically with the ...


3

I don't think a high or low bar squat should necessarily cause knee pain: both are okay when performed correctly. As such, I wouldn't look at that as the cause of your issue. The low bar squat is "better" because you can push more weight. There are a lot of competitive level crossfitters that never low bar squat: their knees are fine. Regardless of all of ...


3

Many runners try to adopt this running style simply because it does take stress off your knee. The craze around Vibrams was a good example of how you were forced to change your running style. I would start with a neutral running shoe. Something with little or no heel to toe drop. The large the heel the more chance you will have to do a heel strike. Second, ...


3

Most often, it is tightness in the lateral rotators that prevent people from safely getting into the lotus position. So yes, a tight piriformis is likely a culprit. The adductors are usually not the issue for lotus. First of all, if you have acute knee pain, you should not even attempt a lotus, or do any of the preparation exercises. If you are pain free at ...


3

I'll address this in two ways, as the final answer really does depend on your goals. Unless otherwise stated, when we are talking about squats, I'm assuming back squats. Health Reasons for Full Squats Specifically, one of the main reasons to squat to depth (defined as the crease of the hip parallel or lower than the top of the knee) has to do with joint ...


3

Part of the reason for squatting deep is to avoid muscle imbalance, but that's not my primary reason. Squatting to parallel or beyond uses the knee and hip joint through a fuller range of motion than half-squats or other partial movements. This is good for mobility and strength for a variety of tasks. Squatting deep also protects the knee joint by ...


3

It could be something more complicated, but generally I'll just say that running hurts, especially when you're just starting or increasing your mileage. I would recommend following a training program like couch-to-5k. With something like that, the distance increase and schedule will be regulated. If you have excessive problems with pain or handling the ...


3

There are two main adaptations of the body to downhill effort: that of the muscles and that of the joints. A downhill effort is made of eccentric muscles contractions (wikipedia link) have a specific impact on muscles. These eccentric contractions result in muscle micro-tears, which are normal. During the rest after the effort, With the repetition of ...


3

I wonder - what muscles can be [approx 5-15 cm above knee]? My guess is that there are very few muscles and they should not be important for the cycling. That would be the quadriceps, and they are definitely very important for cycling. What you are most likely experiencing is hitting your lactate threshold - the power level at which your body cannot provide ...


2

Yes, and I do not have a history of knee problems. I have 2 pairs of compression tights I wear for cold weather runs. I also have several pairs of non-compression tights both insulated and not. I like the feel of the compression tight, however, I do experience knee discomfort and pain when wearing them on any run over a few miles. It seems like the tights ...


2

I am experiencing the same thing. I have a history of knee issues (mostly ITB) and wearing tights for running (and sometimes even wearing skinny jeans throughout the day) seems to exacerbate the problem. I have been running very short distances (3-4k) at an easy pace for the past couple of months to ease back into things and not re-injure myself. The first ...


2

You sound like one of the lucky ones. i was diagnosed with a Bakers Cyst over 3 months ago and it shows no real sign of leaving anytime soon. It was excruciating at the hospital and they gave me pain killers and anti-inflammatory s. That helped a bit but the leg is still bad. Eventually went to the docs about a month ago to get it drained and have a shot of ...


2

In general, good PTs tend to distinguish between two kinds of people. Some clients will be extremely sensitive to pain. These folks will, in general, benefit from being told to exercise even when it hurts a bit, as it will prevent muscle loss &c. Other clients will be significantly less sensitive to pain (case in point, I once finished a 10mi cross-...


2

What you're going through sounds similar to an experience that I had. I was a college athlete, I played basketball and tennis every day of the week and lifted multiple times a week. I had very bad pain in both of my knees and it was due to tendonitis above and below the knee cap. I was treated for this but the pain consisted. I finally went in and got my ...


2

The reasoning behind keeping your shins vertical is this: Moving the shin angle to 90 degrees relative to the floor allows the shin bone and the thigh bone to roll atop one another, reducing stress, says physical therapist Dr. Charlie Weingroff. --LiveStrong.com Many people probably do this poorly because they haven't learned to hip hinge. I would guess ...


2

The knee is a hinge joint that will never respond well to rotational forces. Gray Cook's joint-by-joint approach to training states that lack of stability in the knee is usually caused by lack of mobility in the ankle. Michael Boyle's 8 Essential Mobility Drills suggests placing your toe four inches from a wall, keeping your heel on the floor, and rocking ...


2

The knee is very complex and it can be difficult to say what is good/bad for yours specifically. What is good/bad entirely depends on your condition and strength level. To make matters worse, even physios can disagree (depending on where and when they learnt, and how much they keep up with their science). For example, I've been told by some doctors and ...


2

When I'm doing squats my knees go forward further than my toes. This is not necessarily an issue. It may be due to your individual leverages, how wide your squat stance is, and whether you you can hit appropriate depth that way. Also when I'm standing up I tend to move weight more towards my toes. This is the part that I would concern myself with. ...


2

Recovering from injury is a tricky thing, especially for active people who want to get moving again. Strength exercises can definitely help with injury recovery, but not knowing the specifics of your situation, I'd definitely suggest seeing a professional, like a physiotherapist, for an assessment and recommendations. My guess is that you'll need to start ...


2

There's always going to be benefit from any movement (you're using SOME muscle, so SOME muscle will get trained), but of course, by limiting the range of motion (ROM), you're also limiting the effect. But it's likely ill advised to do any squats or lunges while your knee is being repaired.


2

When I front squat i tend to attempt to perform the same moment as the back squat, but with anterior loading. This is not how I front squat. Though quite related and quite similar, they are distinct movements. For instance, the back position and hip angle are extremely different, and they sometimes do best with different foot placement. The "knees out" cue ...


2

Everyone's hips are slightly different. Most people turn their toes out to ensure that their knee tracks over their toes. That said, squat stances can vary massively depending on type and sport: Powerlifting vs Olympic and the myriad of squat types: Safety Bar, Back Squat, Front Squat, Overhead Squat, Sissy Squat, Zercher Squat, Box Squat, High Bar, Low bar.....


2

Short answer: You should train like anybody else. Only thing what change with age is the error buffer. In other words, your body will tolerate less mistakes. So if you choose running (or any other activity), make sure that your body is prepared and you know how to do that correctly and safely. Long answer: make sure that your mobility and strength level ...


2

The reason why the leg extension is particularly harmful to your knee is the way your leg is partially loaded on the seat, and the rest isn't, causing a "break point" that can be compared to how a twig would break under the same circumstance. Seated leg curls I would argue are even worse, though in this case due to the risk of back injury rather than knee ...


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