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10

It's important to keep one's legs in good working order for anyone who wants to retain the ability to get out of bed, climb stairs, stand up off the toilet, walk around a hilly neighborhood, run away from a fire or other emergency, or sit down to play with a child on the floor. People who are okay not being able to do these things without someone else's help ...


6

I believe you're describing a Sissy Squat *. This is a great body-weight exercise for developing your quadriceps. However, sissy squats don't work the glutes at all; instead recruiting the hip flexors. These would not be a replacement for traditional squats but they can be implemented alongside squats for a challenging leg day. * Not for sissies.


5

This is going to be a yes and no answer, and here is why. If you start from nothing, you will have not have a lot of muscle mass in your legs. Cardio activities such as running, sprinting and cycling will indeed increase muscle mass at this point. It wont grow at the same rate as if you were doing strength exercises though. The reason for this is because the ...


5

Well, yes. But actually no. If we examine your example with "doing squats with your feet glued to the ceiling", we'll find that there's a set of joints that are closing. Namely the hip and the knee. In order to forcibly close these joints, we engage the hip flexor and hamstring respectively. So what is the more realistic version of this? Well, ...


3

I wonder - what muscles can be [approx 5-15 cm above knee]? My guess is that there are very few muscles and they should not be important for the cycling. That would be the quadriceps, and they are definitely very important for cycling. What you are most likely experiencing is hitting your lactate threshold - the power level at which your body cannot provide ...


3

We are commonly advised to turn the toes in (medially rotate) in order to emphasise the lateral head, and to turn the toes out (laterally rotate) in order to emphasise the medial head. And this notion is mostly (1, 2) but not entirely (3) supported by a limited body of research. That is, medial and lateral rotation of the ankle does appear to alter the ...


3

To understand how to correct the problem, it often helps to think carefully about what, exactly, might be happening. But in summary, it may help to: take a shoulder-width stance, externally rotate your feet—slightly, but not excessively, allow the knees to go over the toes, squat to the ankles (i.e. sit down, not ‘back’), maintain neutral anterior pelvic ...


2

Most importantly you have to make sure you are (back)squatting below paralell and with a fairly wide stance: "Squats Don’t Work Your Glutes (Because You’re Squatting Wrong)". Make sure you do not use too heavy weights. If you use too heavy weights; your body will shift the weight forward onto the stronger quads to accomplish the task you give it. ...


2

It's very unlikely that front squats would work the lower traps to any significant degree. The lower fibres of the trapezius are responsible for the following movements of the scapula1: Upper rotation (in which the lowest point of the shoulder blade moves laterally and upward) Adduction (in which the shoulder blades pull together) Depression (in which the ...


2

You're right. Here is why: Lower traps help depress shoulder blades and well as shoulder upward rotation and external rotation. Retracting your shoulders and pulling your shoulders down activates your lower traps the same way a shrug activates upper traps. For this reason, reverse shrugs which you can do on a cable machine work lower traps. To get maximal ...


2

It sounds like you're getting mixed up between two different uses of "pelvic tilt". In the context of the article you linked, "pelvic tilt" refers to rotation (movement) of the pelvis in space, while the femurs are fixed in position. This is what is supposed occur in the movement of a Romanian deadlift - the legs remain still while the ...


2

It seems to me that this is probably fatigue building up to where you can no longer maintain you usual gait. However, from the description of your running style, I think you may want to reconsider that before trying to correct something to continue running heal-toe. I would recommend a more forefoot approach and perhaps trying to shorten your stride and ...


1

Getting outside and getting an actual 10k steps in a day has a lot of other positive effects that you can lose from doing indoor activities. With that said, 10k steps can be converted to other forms of activity depending on what your goal is. An easy way to do this empirically would be to use some sort of smartwatch or heart rate tracker and go on a walk for ...


1

If you squat with proper form - sitting back as you squat down and pushing through your heels rather than leaning forward onto your toes - and if you go ATG, backsquat will always work the glutes more than quads. If you can't go ATG due to ankle mobility, use weightlifting shoes or a plate under your heels. Front squat loads the quads up more when done ...


1

The origin of the old dictate of keeping the knees behind the toes is unclear. Wherever it came from, however, it subsequently became the standard dogma within general fitness circles—a dogma that persists to this day. The notion likely stems from observations that patellofemoral compressive loads increase with the depth of the squat. And since untrained ...


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