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3

To understand how to correct the problem, it often helps to think carefully about what, exactly, might be happening. But in summary, it may help to: take a shoulder-width stance, externally rotate your feet—slightly, but not excessively, allow the knees to go over the toes, squat to the ankles (i.e. sit down, not ‘back’), maintain neutral anterior pelvic ...


2

Most importantly you have to make sure you are (back)squatting below paralell and with a fairly wide stance: "Squats Don’t Work Your Glutes (Because You’re Squatting Wrong)". Make sure you do not use too heavy weights. If you use too heavy weights; your body will shift the weight forward onto the stronger quads to accomplish the task you give it. ...


1

If you squat with proper form - sitting back as you squat down and pushing through your heels rather than leaning forward onto your toes - and if you go ATG, backsquat will always work the glutes more than quads. If you can't go ATG due to ankle mobility, use weightlifting shoes or a plate under your heels. Front squat loads the quads up more when done ...


0

To answer your question.. yes, You can do every squat with your butt to the ground, rather than a regular squat, which engages the glutes more. the glutes activate more at the bottom and take some pressure away from quads. Stay away from front squats as those primarily target quads. You might be quad dominant due to a weak posterior, so if you have strong ...


0

quad dominant means that your quads are bigger than the remaining muscles. the body doesn't magically pick one muscle at random to use in an exercise, it always uses the strongest and most rested muscle first. for normal humans the gluteus is the biggest muscle in the body, so it will be the muscle to be used the most, it will also be the muscle to get tired ...


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The origin of the old dictate of keeping the knees behind the toes is unclear. Wherever it came from, however, it subsequently became the standard dogma within general fitness circles—a dogma that persists to this day. The notion likely stems from observations that patellofemoral compressive loads increase with the depth of the squat. And since untrained ...


5

This is going to be a yes and no answer, and here is why. If you start from nothing, you will have not have a lot of muscle mass in your legs. Cardio activities such as running, sprinting and cycling will indeed increase muscle mass at this point. It wont grow at the same rate as if you were doing strength exercises though. The reason for this is because the ...


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