Hot answers tagged

5

Beware of any blanket recommendations you read for anything fitness or nutrition related! The recommendation may be correct... for a certain population. It doesn't mean it's correct for you personally. Your best bet is to: Get and stay active Focus on slow and steady improvements Learn patience with the process Below are some very general nutritional ...


5

It's not very likely that exercise is increasing your breast size. This study states that estrogen levels typically go down when you are in better shape. More likely, you feel like they are bigger because a combination of other effects. The muscle underneath could be growing. After only 6 weeks, I imagine this is not a large effect unless you were ...


5

The answer with all questions of this manner is "It Depends". Specifically, the factors that influence the decision are: Are you competing in a strength sport? If so: How close to the contest date are you? Is the squat a contested lift (usually only Powerlifting, but occasionally this applies to Strongman as well) Your individual lever lengths and ...


4

Let's start with some basics: Dianabol is a known anabolic steroid, not a vitamin Creatine is not a steroid, nor does it function like one An excellent article at Examine.com explores the difference. Genetic Differences Even if your friend did not resort to using dianabol, there can be genetic differences that affect how quickly you can get good at the ...


4

Although I am not a woman I think your problem is quite understandable from a physiological perspective. Let's first relate your problem to a standard situation. If I start lifting weights and for every volume of fat I lose, I get the same amount of muscles back, I will gain weight. Muscles weigh more than fat and therefore every percentage muscle increase ...


4

It used to be believed that lifting weight could harm your natural growth as a young person, this is now considered a myth or at best outdated information. The trainers at your gym have probably learned "weight lifting for young people is bad" without knowing why they believe so. There's no real difference between doing body weight exercises and weighted ...


3

I had this issue when I was a beginner. Weak muscles can shake or "shiver".. really it just takes time to get past it A lot of it could be your stabilizer muscles such as biceps and core during a bench press aren't quite up to par yet, but balancing the bar during a bench press is a workout in itself. I had this issue until I surpassed 100 lbs on ...


3

I am a weight lifter, and have been for 35 years to competition level in my youth,I have been a personal trainer also, I am 51 years old on intermitted fasting ( 16 hours fasting / hours feeding window )and I train 4 times a week as heavy as I can in the morning at 7.30am. I train in the morning in my fasting time, with only a cup a coffee taken 30 minutes ...


3

In my personal opinion, 5000 seems very high unless you plan on competing at 18. If you consume only 80 grams of protein per day, that's roughly 320kcal, leaving 4680 calories from fats and carbohydrates. That also seems like a skewed ratio. I'm almost certain that doing this will make you fat. Strong, but fat. And since you want definition, this is not ...


3

There are countless personal factors, such as your genetics, current fitness level, past exercise and daily habits, that will determine your total daily energy expenditure (TDEE). The calculators don't, and can't, take all of those into account. They can provide a decent ballpark figure, but that's about it. So instead, I suggest you simply take the ...


3

This sounds like a troll, but I'll answer for anyone interested. For your bench press, the best way for a novice to bench more weight is to just bench more. You can likely recover after about 48 hours after every workout so you can bench three times per week. You might be able to add five pounds to your bench after each workout assuming you eat and rest ...


3

This is one of those questions where the actual answer boils down to your desire for variation in your exercise routine. While there are many anecdotal reasons to vary your squat stance, there aren’t that many actual studies to recommend variation as a key to squatting success. There was, however, a biomechanical study done in 2001: A three-dimensional ...


3

The other answers touched on strength training, and I agree that working with a barbell is going to give you the best bang for your buck. The four exercises that are going to give you the most bang for your buck are: Squats Overhead Press Deadlift Bench Press There are several programs that help you get started. Starting Strength is an excellent book and ...


2

Just speaking for me personally, I find it pretty impossible to get my hips to go below my knee if I'm not at least shoulders-wide stance. I would go as wide as you need to in order to: Achieve depth. Have your knees out and pointing where your toes are. Be able to truly use your glutes. Be able to keep your weight on your heels. Even on a deadlift, which ...


2

Dianabol seems to be steroids and taking those can have all kinds of nasty medical consequences, they are not vitamins! Don't sacrifice your health just to get to take a shortcut. Creatin is good, it's openly used by a lot of athletes, what it does it increase your ability to supply energy to your muscles so that you can do a few more reps and thus get more ...


2

Continuing the theme of free-weight work you could try the following (for 3-5 sets of 8-15 reps, tracking and increasing weight slowly over time), those in bold are strongly recommended. Outside of isolation, if you aren't doing power cleans, you should! Shoulders: Barbell Overhead Press (strict)/Push Press Dumbbell Lateral Raise Barbell Shrug Dumbbell ...


2

The power variations (power cleans and power snatches) involve landing in the power position (with your legs above 90 deg), like a half or quater squat. That said however I am not a medical professional but I would avoid the O-lifts in general. You usually land up putting yourself in dangerous situations during the learning process. I would stick to ...


2

yes,natural functional movements are safe and encouraged for obese people.The only thing to keep in mind for an obese person is that organs are being crushed by their visceral fat, so have to work harder, therefore intensity must be managed to prevent organ trauma.


1

Of course it is possible. There are even strength & conditioning coaches who stopped using Squats, such as Mike Boyle. However, I want to make the distinction between squats and back squats. I believe squats are a natural human movement, and must be done frequently. Therefore, I would suggest you to do Goblet Squats, or air squats for mobility benefits. ...


1

If your workouts will be as intens as they are now, you won't lose any mass. It's even possible that you will gain more mass since this will be a new way of stimulating the muscle which your body isn't used to. I started doing calisthenics myself about 3 years ago and I've gained a more solid body since then. Prior to calisthenics I did about 2,5 years of ...


1

It will be fine. Your body needs time for recovery especially if you're a beginner then it's best to have 24-48 hours gap for the muscles to recover.


1

When following a strength routine, like yours (the three big lifts), you should include some optional excersices in order to have balance. Especially when you train for bodybuilding. It's prefered to be included one from the following excersises for each group per day: Back: Dumbbell Row Machine Row Shoulders: Seated or Standing Dumbbell Overhead Press ...


1

I'd recommend that you pick the muscles you think are lacking and work those. Small Biceps? 4x10-15 (4 sets of 10-15 reps) of Hammer/Barbell Curls. Tiny shoulders? 4x10-15 of Strict Press/Face Pulls/Lat Raises Flat Chest? 4x10-15 of Cable fly/Incline Bench. You get the idea, just pick an exercise (ExRx has good resource on which exercises work which ...


1

There will always be many formulas out there and no one here is going to provide you with a more authoritative formula. That being said they don't differ that much and you should be OK with any formula for weight loss for the whole being. Once you get closer to your weight loss goal you may need to fine tune it. It sounds like you are trying to lose 2 ...


1

No, 5000 calories a day is almost as bad as eating 500 calories a day. At your age, you should be eating a little more calories than an average adult if you are exceptionally active but it should be a maximum of 3200 calories, not 5000. 5000 calories may also get you strong, but it will get you fat at the same time, as Alec stated. If you are cutting lots of ...


1

For building muscle and losing weight, a combination of cardio and weightlifting will be the fastest way to see the results you desire. For muscle building, Strong Lifts and Starting Strength are the most popular and recommended exercises. Make sure that whatever weightlifting program you follow works your whole body and not just specific parts. Combining ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible