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Enemy is a strong word, and carbohydrates can be a great fuel source for athletes and those engaged in any training program. However, as the saying goes, Too much of a good thing... When you take a bite of something that contains carbohydrates, the carbs will eventually convert to blood glucose (blood sugar). A high level of blood sugar can be toxic, so the ...


6

There is a lot of misinformation and fear being spread about sodas of all kinds. Really, drinking diet soda should not have any effect on a low carb diet for most people. There are 0 calories diet soda. Diet soda is 99.8% water (Can't link to USDA reference site due to government shutdown) The main risks from diet soda are Tooth enamel decay Bone loss ...


5

The only studies to my knowledge that have any correlation between carbohydrates and Alzheimers are epidemiological. In short they use survey data to find areas of study where more controlled studies should be performed to see if there is a true cause and effect relationship. The problem is that many people assume that correlation is the same thing as ...


2

Note: this got a bit long, so the TL:DR is, the best diet is one that fits into your lifestyle and helps you maintain a caloric deficit. In simple terms, your body weight is a balancing act between calories in vs calories out (calories in being what you eat / drink, calories out being what you burn through exercise, everyday life, or pass naturally from ...


2

A lot of people find it easy to lose weight with a keto (lchf) diet, but it doesn't work for everyone, you'll have to find what works best for you. The type of people that seems to have most luck eating keto are the ones with disturbed carbohydrate metabolism, i.e. those with high insulin resistance, i.e. often those with lots of visceral fat, those who are ...


2

You can, but its not optimal. Low carb is OK for fat loss, sub-optimal for muscle gain. Personally I carb cycle so training days are relatively high carb - 150g or so. Non-training days are low carb, 50g of carbs. Here are a few links to help: Why it is bad: http://www.examiner.com/article/low-carb-diets-make-it-hard-to-build-muscle Some links that ...


2

Dr Peter Attia is an accomplished athlete who has remarkable athletic endurance accomplishments performed during nutritional ketosis (due to very low carbohydrate intake). His blog is well-researched and well written. I think you'll find his answer to your question is that carbs are not necessary for the type of activity you plan. My personal experience is ...


2

2010 ISSN Position Stand: • Individuals engaged in a general fitness program can typically meet needs by consuming a normal diet (45-55% CHO; 3-5 g/kg/day). • Athletes involved in moderate amounts of intense training (2-3 hrs/day, 5-6 times/week) typically need to consume 55-65% CHO (5-8 g/kg/day or 250 - 1,200 g/day for 50 - 150 kg athletes) in order to ...


2

Was this all a waste of time? You mean the time you spent reaching your goals, eating healthy, and working out, to the great benefit of your health? You tell me. Should I have kept carbs to 180-220g and just hit a deficit of 300-500 kCal? If you've found a regimen that works for you, then that's the biggest takeaway. Sure, it may be that other regimens ...


2

High intensity intervals and eliminating carbs sounds good to me. I'd pull back on the weights, staying on the high-weight, low-rep side, but not eliminate them. If your goal were mine, I'd scour Martin Berkhan's LeanGains for information to see if I can tweak anything further than the basics already mentioned.


1

Most sources would not classify 100g/day as a low-carb diet, which may affect the relevancy of answers. But the short answer to your question is No, not detrimental. A book that supports this conclusion and may otherwise be of interest to you: The Art and Science of Low Carb Performance by Jeff S. Volek Ph.D., RD and Stephen D. Phinney Ph.D., MD.


1

The answer is... it depends. The little to no carb approach you mention is known as ketosis after the ketones produced by the liver when the body utilises fat stores for energy instead of carbohydrates and has been shown to be beneficial for a variety of things from fat loss to aiding focus and concentration to increasing life expectancy by cutting down ...


1

The flab on your stomach is just a part of the flab which is all over your body. The people who are telling you you can't target it specifically are right; you have to just lose fat and your body will remove it from all over your body. So you should reconceputalize your goal as just "losing weight". note that everyone has an inherited pattern of fat ...


1

If you're talking about entering ketosis via a ketogenic diet that's pretty interesting that you felt problems lasting for weeks. Most research I've seen, and my own experience, shows ketones consumption happening ~48 hours after carbohydrate restriction. I'm sure there's a huge variety in there, but 7 weeks seems excessively long. In this 2004 study that ...


1

6: No, it it is not good if you eat oats every meal of the day. "Whey" protein is nothing magical. It's just a particular food that has a rather decent nutritional profile and there happens to be a ton of the stuff because of dairy production overall. Ballpark you should shoot for 1 gram or so per pound of body weight. Some folks say half as much, some ...


1

You're not really doing any type of strength training. The pushups, situps, and crunches are certainly better than nothing but they are a far cry from an effective strength training plan. If you want to stick with body weight activities you can, and there are some great books ( http://amzn.to/1v01hXz ) that you can check out to get you on the right path. I'd ...


1

You should eat a normal diet with a normal amount of calories. The weight loss toward an ideal weight should come from gains in physical fitness. Suppose in the future you weigh 70 kg, you are eating 2500 Kcal/day and you are physically very fit. If you then have equilibrium between consumed energy and energy expenditure at 2500 Kcal/day, then why can't such ...


1

The more calories you consume, and carbohydrates are calories in their simplest form, the less quickly you will lose weight. Example : If you were to consume 1400 calories/day and burning 1750 calories/day you will lose 1 pound in 10 days. Adding 175 calories in carbohydrates/day to your diet you will lose that same pound in 20 days. This assumes that ...


1

You're not going to lose "only belly fat", but maybe you meant to differentiate "fat" from "muscle"? HIIT and a very strict diet will increase your odds of making a significant difference. Adding a thermogenic supplement may also help, but different people react to those in different ways, especially if you're already caffeine-tolerant. I differ from Dave ...


1

You should get at least half of your energy needs from carbs. This will build up large stores of glucose in your liver and muscles, allowing you to exercise on any time of the day. What matters is that you eat large amounts of carbs every day, it doesn't matter exactly when you eat, except that you'll find it difficult to exercise after your main mail of the ...


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