19

I am a programmer myself and often spend about 10-13 hours a day in a chair and had similar problems. My solution - a full body 20 minute workout everyday, with emphasis on more 'active' physical activities for your back and legs. For example - no bench exercises - do a lot of reps of bur-pees, dead-lifts, upper push ups with lightweight dumbbells, and pull ...


11

The muscles of the lower back play a critical role in posture, weightlifting (the specific sport), and lifting weights (generally). They keep your torso erect, making them helpful during just about every physical activity that involves running, bearing a load, or jumping. A strong lower back makes back pain and back injury less likely and aids in sports ...


10

Between this post and the prior one asking for 5x5 squat help, I strongly recommend seeing a qualified personal trainer and also your Dr. for a physical prior to any more exercising. Based on your posts, you're overweight, out of shape and do not have a background in weightlifting: this is a combination that could get you SERIOUSLY injured. Stop, get a ...


7

Thanks for providing the information about your workout. I agree with @Informaficker that the best way to deal with a back problem is to seek professional expertise. Lots of people have back pain and lots have advice about what worked for them. However, all back pain is not alike and there are many contributing factors, so treat your condition as unique. ...


7

Side note for those experiencing back pain. Your spine is held upright by both the rectus abdominis (abdominals) and the erector spinae (lower back). They act in opposition, much like guy wires hold up a radio tower. If tension on one set of muscles is greater/less than the other, there will be stress on the spine. What can happen is that if the abdominals ...


7

No, it should not be avoided. Like any machine, it's a tool, and it has a purpose. The article seems to refer to the fact that during a seated leg press, the weight presses down on your feet, and cascades through your legs and into your lower back, which is pressed against the seat. They neglect to mention that all weightlifting exercises has this problem, ...


7

First you need to realise that sitting all the time is not just bad for your back, but also bad for your learning. Break the learning into chunks of about 20min. Use the breaks for exercise. This should actually help you with learning, so don't even get the idea that you have to add the "lost time" at the end. Depending on your current fitness level a ...


6

The key to lifting injury free is to keep the intensity manageable and the form correct. The big 4 lifts: squat, bench, deadlift, and overhead press are excellent staples that give you a lot of benefit for the work you do. However, if you are starting out you may want to work up to them. The posterior chain is important, and one of the first things we ...


6

It is smart to look at fitness when you are young with an eye on preventing problems as you age. Back pain can have multiple causes. Some of the causes stem from degenerative changes of the joints, restrictions in the soft tissues (muscle and fascia), protective muscle spasms, disc degeneration and/or prolapse, and osteoporosis (weakening or thinning of ...


6

Yoga's cat pose is perfect for this. 2 minutes of it before going to sleep. And then 2 minutes of extended cat's pose with stretching opposing arm and leg. Another exercise is pull-ups (or just hang from something by your hands), letting the weight of your lower body to stretch the space between the lumbar discs in your lower spine. Rotate and wiggle a bit....


6

I'm a web developer, and I have to work for more than 10 hours a day. So in my opinion the best thing to do for any desk job or long periods of studying is taking small breaks, like 5 minutes every 1 hour or so to do some dynamic stretching or moving in general. For example in my case, I take a quick walk arround, a little stretching especially for my back, ...


6

Firstly, imaging, such as x-rays and MRIs, to determine the cause of lower back pain is problematic because asymptomatic people tend to have all kinds of spinal degenerations which don't actually cause any problems, with a prevalence of approximately 70% of individuals younger than 50 years of age to >90% of individuals older than 50 years of age.(1) This ...


5

Hyperkyphosis - hunched back-, due to muscle imbalance, is normally caused by weak mid back muscles (rhomboids, part of traps, levator scap, etc.) and tight pectoral muscles. This is common in high school age wrestling athletes for example. Seated rows, shoulder shrugs, rotator-cuff exercises; while paired with pectoral stretches can help correct this. If ...


5

If you feel sharp pain in the lower back, then you need to adjust the exercise. The reason why lying leg raises are often painful, is that the lower back gets pinched and compressed as the weight of the legs tilts the hip and pulls the lower back upwards. The main leg lifting muscle is the psoas major, which connects your thigh bone directly to your spine. ...


5

With only one week before the move, you don't have enough time to develop significantly more strength. Instead, focus on these tips for safely moving things: Before lifting an object, take a big breath and hold it (Valsalva maneuver) at least until you are standing upright. The goal is to keep your torso rigid. Move with your feet, not your back. Do not ...


5

To build on Eric's comment; the best advice is to follow a workout program that is tried and true. If you're trying to make your own program, and you find yourself having to ask this question, you should probably not be making your own program in the first place. To make your own program is something you do when you know your body very well, and you know ...


4

To answer your question best, you need to understand why you are doing overhead press. If you are doing Starting Strength or Strong Lifts, it's best to leave it in there and keep working on it--in those programs it's used for both core work and shoulder work. If your goal is simply to have stronger shoulders, then there's no reason to remain standing. If ...


4

It sounds like the problem with your (standing) overhead press is either form or maximal isometric strength in the core. Changing to an exercise that removes both of these factors and doesn't improve them does not seem like a productive way to increase your overhead press. Without a lot more details on your training history (sets, reps, loads, frequency), ...


4

Planks! As long as you have proper form they are very good at building strength for your core without having to do crunches.


4

Short answer Don't worry about it. Longer answer Weight belts are NOT going to give you any problems unless you pack on an obscene amount of weights. And this is a catch-22 anyway, because the weight you'd need to strap to yourself is way more than you'd ever be able to do pullups or dips with. You should always opt for a belt which can be tightened ...


4

The reason it's "forbidden" to foam roll your lower back is because you don't have a rib cage there to protect your internal organs. You can, and often should foam roll your lower back, but it should be done with something larger than a foam roller to spread out the pressure over a larger area. So no, do NOT use a tennis ball to roll the lumbar region of ...


4

This article from Business Insider talks about a study that concluded that 52 minutes of work followed by a 17 minute break was the work cadence that the participants' best employees used. You can use whatever cadence you like, but the core principle -- from both a physical and mental fitness perspective -- is to get up and move every hour. If that's a ...


4

Others have mentioned correct breathing but i might also suggest that: 1). The weight is too heavy. If you can't do the movement correctly the first response should be to lower the weight until you can. If you can't even do it with the empty bar then there may be another, more structural, issue at hand. 2). You are possibly going to low. For romain ...


3

Medical Clearance: I'm assuming that your surgeon has given you the ok for weight training. Given that you have had back surgery and have previously injured yourself using weights, you may want to check with your physical therapist for an evaluation of any muscle weaknesses or limitations of motion that you may have so that you can address these before ...


3

The sit and reach test is part of a general health assessment battery of tests. The basic method is to sit on the floor, legs flat, with feet against a box or other vertical stop. A measuring stick or device is used to see how far a person can reach towards (or past) their toes. It's used as a measure of general health when included in a full assessment. ...


3

There are several ways to decompress your discs and spine. The first is prevention by minimizing prolonged positioning, especially poor sitting posture. This q/a gives you several ideas, as well as stretching and strengthening exercises to improve your sitting posture. To decompress your spine and reduce the effects of gravity and prolonged sitting you ...


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