10

Two main tips (note that I used to run in Wellington, NZ which is famed for both its hills and its wind). Firstly, a headwind is basically a hill you can't see - treat it that way. Techniques like small, quick steps to preserve momentum are most useful. Secondly, for a sufficiently strong wind you can draft off people. Tuck in behind someone in front and ...


10

A marathon is altogether different league when compared to a 10 km run. There are many things to consider... Hydration. You should have a proper hydration plan in your long distance races. For 10 km races, you wouldn't probably have had hydration during the race course. In a marathon, I would advice you to start hydrating from the 5 km mark. From there ...


10

5km or 7km mileage once a week is nowhere close to proper preparation for a marathon. You greatly increase risk of injury by running a marathon unprepared. Go see a doctor about your knee pain from the 20km race and forget about a marathon anytime soon. Many marathon plans have a long run of over 20km once a week for several months (and often with a run or ...


8

So you went for a long run for your current training level and felt tired for a few days afterwards? That would be expected and rather the point. You're trying to stress your body so that it will adapt to the stress and then some (supercompensation). This process means that you will be a bit tired. I'll note that some of the commenters wanted to calculate ...


7

It sounds like you're off to a great start with minimalist shoes. The first rule is to start slow and increase usage gradually, and you have done so. The shoes Make sure the shoes fit perfectly. You can get blisters and pain in minimalist shoes pretty easily, especially on long runs, if they don't fit perfectly or you're not wearing them correctly. Also, if ...


7

If you were to decide to attempt a marathon given the training level you've described, there's an interesting academic article that may be helpful in estimating your likelihood of finishing without injury. The paper is by Yeung, Yeung, and Wong, "Marathon finishers and non-finishers characteristics: A preamble to success," Journal of Sports Medicine and ...


6

For the most part, the science is still unclear on the long term effects of things like long distance running on the body. Some studies have suggested that it can be bad for knee cartilage (in beginners), but goes on to say that their findings were likely not clinically relevant due to experimental error (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24045919). Other ...


6

I think your question is extremely broad, but there are some commonalities to this situation that are applicable across a wide range of endurance events, so I will hit the high points of the things that beginning endurance athletes often don't think about or do wrong. Climate: Many times people underestimate the effect that climate has on an endurance event....


5

I think breaking 3 hours or better for a marathon or 1.20 for half is very unlikely on training just at the weekends. Of course it depends on your starting point, and if you do lots of other cardio work during the week. Even if you are extremely talented, you still have to train to get the good results. I know many people who run sub 3 hour marathons, and ...


5

If you want to win a 5k, walking is a great start, but will probably not get you there on its own. Fast walking will help you build a strong base level of aerobic fitness. Your heart and lungs will develop and improve your capacity for running. After you build this base, your cardiovascular system needs to learn to function efficiently as you approach (or ...


5

I train for cycling time trials, ranging from 10 mile sprints to 12 hr endurance races. I train on Heart rate and power meters, so I know accurately when I've upped my endurance/fitness. I find if I have a training session, whether that be Turbo or out on the road and I've exceeded a burn of 3000 cals then that following night (without fail) I will suffer ...


5

I would rather say it is not about waiting if not about preparation and training. I've seen people starting from the zero(in terms of running, otherwise in a good fitness) with 16 weeks plans and successfully completing their first marathons, so i would say the 5 months you have ahead of you should be enough. however don't go crazy and set some realistic ...


5

Source: I've done one marathon, a 50k, and many, many, many runs at distances under that. I'm no expert just relaying what I've learned and come to understand. Hope you find it helpful. Running The key to running marathons is, well, running. Strength training is important as well, as building your core and supporting muscles will aid in your overall ...


5

During training, modern athletes can use GPS watches to track distance and times. The old-school way would be to map out a route pre-mapped out route with known distances and record the start and stop times. This is of course still used in countries like Kenya. For races, they're tracked by the operators of the race. Modern marathons will put a small chip ...


5

Marathon runners are skinny because they spend all their free time training in running and not in bodybuilding. Plus bodybuilding does not necessarily help make them become better runners. Bodybuilders can't run because they spend all their free time training in bodybuilding and not in running. Plus endurance running does not necessarily help them become ...


4

Generally speaking, for running you should never wear cotton. Once it gets wet it chafes and that hurts. Options: Wear nothing under your shorts. Most shorts have a liner that may be perfectly sufficient. Wear short running tights. This is mostly for chafing to prevent the skin of the thighs rubbing together. You don't need to wear anything underneath. ...


4

In my opinion the furthest I would go in training pre marathon is about 22 miles. And I would only do 1 of these. The rest of the long runs I would suggest should be between 18-20 miles. The reason I say this, is that running the full 26 miles takes a lot out of you, and I think would have a negative affect on the actual marathon rather than a positive. ...


4

While I don’t have a specific answer for marathon running, I can relate it to a somewhat similar requirement. I feel the methodology utilized would share some of the same characteristics. As a competitive rower, I am faced with racing long distances in a “Head” style race. The typical distance is 3.2 miles (~5000 meters). Granted, this is not a marathon ...


4

I can't state that the temperature was your problem, but it's the title of the question so I'm going to answer that specifically. Someone who is acclimated to heat will have numerous physiological advantages over someone who is not: They will sweat out less electrolytes, particularly salt. They will sweat earlier, starting heat regulation early on. They ...


4

Yes, I think that if you can run a 1/2 marathon, you should be able to at least complete a marathon. The method that I am going to suggest is called the Galloway Run/Walk program. There is a good PDF article here, that has a chart for pacing and how much to run or walk by pace. Make sure to read/note this paragraph: Runners: Remember that long ones ...


3

You'll be able to complete this marathon - you just won't be able to complete it fast. The key for you right now is to start getting comfortable with running longer distances. You didn't mention what pace you typically run at, so I'm going to assume it's 8mph for the sake of calculations (you can adjust depending on what it actually is). If you feel good ...


3

This article does, in a long way, answer your question: The Marathon Myth: High intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T.) vs. Long Duration Training (L.D.T.) I have written several FitBit Articles this year detailing the efficacy of High Intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T. training). H.I.I.T. has been shown to develop much higher levels of cardiovascular ...


3

There's no universal cap on barefoot running. People do ultramarathons barefoot, and marathons that are entirely on asphalt. But pretty much any source on barefoot/minimalist running advice is going to tell you to ease into it to build up the strength in your feet. If doing more than 10k causes you pain, listen to your body and keep it to shorter runs for ...


3

“CrossFit Endurance coach and 100-mile trail run fanatic, Brian MacKenzie of Costa Mesa, California, scrawled a simple looking workout set on a whiteboard in his home gym, then spent five minutes teaching me proper rowing technique. I was in need of a workout to help me retain fitness while I rehabbed a foot injury, so he directed me to a rowing ...


3

I agree with @jsmith but all the plans tend to follow a few specific guidelines. Here are the ones I'm following: Build up to at least 20 miles 1-2 months before a marathon race. Run all long runs ( +16 miles) at an easy pace. Do one long run every week but run your longest long runs every other weekend at the most. Aside from running for distance for the ...


3

Maximal legspan contain lateral and vertical movements such as vertical splits and lateral splits. Rarity of people achieve sufficient technique and strength to maintain different splits and rotational movements of thighs so they are hard-to-use benchmarks. Many factors contribute to legspan. Factors contain core flexibility, core strength, pelvis tilt and ...


3

What speed work can do is make the slower paces easier to maintain at a great distance. So let's say your current LSD pace is 12 min/mi. You can currently run a half marathon at 11 min/mi. If you did speed work and got your half marathon pace up to 10 min/mi. The 12 min/mi pace would be much more comfortable. As such, you would be able to run a 12 min/mi ...


3

It sounds like overall you're on the right track. I'm a marathon runner myself and I was actually pretty taken aback a few weeks ago when I interviewed an Ironman coach and he spoke about the importance of 80/20 training (something I've never actually done)… yet I've run a marathon is 3:13. Your marathon time will be as good as your training, nutrition, ...


3

You should definitely pee during any race even a quarter of that length. The duration of a couple rounds in a bush is going to be negligible in the bigger picture anyway. One of the main reasons why you shouldn't be holding it in that long, is that your bladder will retain a lot of the bacteria that it is trying to flush, and it can end up giving you ...


3

For seven days, just very light trainings/rest would suffice. I think you'll both make it hopefully since the time limit of 12 hours is too high. For the Next Time: Prepare in Advance It's just a bit longer than marathon, here is a 12-weeks training plan for marathon to give you a big picture of how the prep should look like. However, you should not ...


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