21

Whether or not it is necessary to wait an hour depends on you, actually. Some people can drink a lot and go run, some people can't. However, unless you are chronically dehydrated or exercising in extreme weather conditions, you won't need water for most of your runs. You should be getting most of your hydration from your diet during the course of the day, ...


10

Two main tips (note that I used to run in Wellington, NZ which is famed for both its hills and its wind). Firstly, a headwind is basically a hill you can't see - treat it that way. Techniques like small, quick steps to preserve momentum are most useful. Secondly, for a sufficiently strong wind you can draft off people. Tuck in behind someone in front and ...


10

A marathon is altogether different league when compared to a 10 km run. There are many things to consider... Hydration. You should have a proper hydration plan in your long distance races. For 10 km races, you wouldn't probably have had hydration during the race course. In a marathon, I would advice you to start hydrating from the 5 km mark. From there ...


10

5km or 7km mileage once a week is nowhere close to proper preparation for a marathon. You greatly increase risk of injury by running a marathon unprepared. Go see a doctor about your knee pain from the 20km race and forget about a marathon anytime soon. Many marathon plans have a long run of over 20km once a week for several months (and often with a run or ...


8

Especially in running, I am a firm believer in "If it isn't broken, don't fix it". The whole movement of Chi/Pose and extreme minimalist shoes has grown out of a misconception and bad application of "heel striking". Heel striking does not mean that your heel touches first, it has to do with where your foot is when the majority of your weight falls on it. ...


8

So you went for a long run for your current training level and felt tired for a few days afterwards? That would be expected and rather the point. You're trying to stress your body so that it will adapt to the stress and then some (supercompensation). This process means that you will be a bit tired. I'll note that some of the commenters wanted to calculate ...


7

It sounds like you're off to a great start with minimalist shoes. The first rule is to start slow and increase usage gradually, and you have done so. The shoes Make sure the shoes fit perfectly. You can get blisters and pain in minimalist shoes pretty easily, especially on long runs, if they don't fit perfectly or you're not wearing them correctly. Also, ...


7

In both cases West-to-East and East-to-West jet lag does apply (not north and south / south and north). Basically your body and brain are completely out of sync due to the departure time and arrival time when travelling through different time zones. I strongly suggest arriving a few days (atleast 3, some people prefer 1 week) earlier before your marathon. ...


7

If you were to decide to attempt a marathon given the training level you've described, there's an interesting academic article that may be helpful in estimating your likelihood of finishing without injury. The paper is by Yeung, Yeung, and Wong, "Marathon finishers and non-finishers characteristics: A preamble to success," Journal of Sports Medicine and ...


6

Interesting conversation and results. I like to use what is known as the Yasso 800 method named after Bart Yasso. Instead of using your half marathon time, base it off of repeated 800 meter efforts. To test, run a series of 800 meter controlled efforts with ~400 meter jog in between. The average time in minutes and seconds of your 800s will be your ...


6

For the most part, the science is still unclear on the long term effects of things like long distance running on the body. Some studies have suggested that it can be bad for knee cartilage (in beginners), but goes on to say that their findings were likely not clinically relevant due to experimental error (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24045919). Other ...


6

I think your question is extremely broad, but there are some commonalities to this situation that are applicable across a wide range of endurance events, so I will hit the high points of the things that beginning endurance athletes often don't think about or do wrong. Climate: Many times people underestimate the effect that climate has on an endurance event....


5

I train for cycling time trials, ranging from 10 mile sprints to 12 hr endurance races. I train on Heart rate and power meters, so I know accurately when I've upped my endurance/fitness. I find if I have a training session, whether that be Turbo or out on the road and I've exceeded a burn of 3000 cals then that following night (without fail) I will suffer ...


5

If you want to win a 5k, walking is a great start, but will probably not get you there on its own. Fast walking will help you build a strong base level of aerobic fitness. Your heart and lungs will develop and improve your capacity for running. After you build this base, your cardiovascular system needs to learn to function efficiently as you approach (or ...


5

I think breaking 3 hours or better for a marathon or 1.20 for half is very unlikely on training just at the weekends. Of course it depends on your starting point, and if you do lots of other cardio work during the week. Even if you are extremely talented, you still have to train to get the good results. I know many people who run sub 3 hour marathons, and ...


5

I would rather say it is not about waiting if not about preparation and training. I've seen people starting from the zero(in terms of running, otherwise in a good fitness) with 16 weeks plans and successfully completing their first marathons, so i would say the 5 months you have ahead of you should be enough. however don't go crazy and set some realistic ...


5

Source: I've done one marathon, a 50k, and many, many, many runs at distances under that. I'm no expert just relaying what I've learned and come to understand. Hope you find it helpful. Running The key to running marathons is, well, running. Strength training is important as well, as building your core and supporting muscles will aid in your overall ...


5

During training, modern athletes can use GPS watches to track distance and times. The old-school way would be to map out a route pre-mapped out route with known distances and record the start and stop times. This is of course still used in countries like Kenya. For races, they're tracked by the operators of the race. Modern marathons will put a small chip ...


5

Marathon runners are skinny because they spend all their free time training in running and not in bodybuilding. Plus bodybuilding does not necessarily help make them become better runners. Bodybuilders can't run because they spend all their free time training in bodybuilding and not in running. Plus endurance running does not necessarily help them become ...


4

Night sweats can be related to an increase in exercise intensity due to the affect of exercise on the endocrine glands and hormone secreations. In general, excessive sweating at night is caused by hormones. That is why menopausal women are prone to night sweats. However, there are also several other causes, including medical or medication causes so night ...


4

Stick with whatever routines you have used to for your LSR/long-distance training! You know it works. "If it ain't broke..." It is a very, very common mistake to overdo all the preparations for the first marathon... usually with less-than-optimal results. I did that as well for my first marathon: Eating a lot more pasta than usual (almost the double than ...


4

My first marathon was 4 months ago. I did not worry about what I read on the Internet, but rather made sure that I felt good. Above all, I tried not to mess with my eating routine. I was much more afraid of upsetting my stomach than of running low on carbs. I even had a glass of wine the evening before because, well, I liked to. Granted, I did eat lots of ...


4

Generally speaking, for running you should never wear cotton. Once it gets wet it chafes and that hurts. Options: Wear nothing under your shorts. Most shorts have a liner that may be perfectly sufficient. Wear short running tights. This is mostly for chafing to prevent the skin of the thighs rubbing together. You don't need to wear anything underneath. ...


4

In my opinion the furthest I would go in training pre marathon is about 22 miles. And I would only do 1 of these. The rest of the long runs I would suggest should be between 18-20 miles. The reason I say this, is that running the full 26 miles takes a lot out of you, and I think would have a negative affect on the actual marathon rather than a positive. ...


4

While I don’t have a specific answer for marathon running, I can relate it to a somewhat similar requirement. I feel the methodology utilized would share some of the same characteristics. As a competitive rower, I am faced with racing long distances in a “Head” style race. The typical distance is 3.2 miles (~5000 meters). Granted, this is not a marathon ...


4

I can't state that the temperature was your problem, but it's the title of the question so I'm going to answer that specifically. Someone who is acclimated to heat will have numerous physiological advantages over someone who is not: They will sweat out less electrolytes, particularly salt. They will sweat earlier, starting heat regulation early on. They ...


4

Yes, I think that if you can run a 1/2 marathon, you should be able to at least complete a marathon. The method that I am going to suggest is called the Galloway Run/Walk program. There is a good PDF article here, that has a chart for pacing and how much to run or walk by pace. Make sure to read/note this paragraph: Runners: Remember that long ones ...


3

There's no universal cap on barefoot running. People do ultramarathons barefoot, and marathons that are entirely on asphalt. But pretty much any source on barefoot/minimalist running advice is going to tell you to ease into it to build up the strength in your feet. If doing more than 10k causes you pain, listen to your body and keep it to shorter runs for ...


3

This article does, in a long way, answer your question: The Marathon Myth: High intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T.) vs. Long Duration Training (L.D.T.) I have written several FitBit Articles this year detailing the efficacy of High Intensity Interval Training (H.I.I.T. training). H.I.I.T. has been shown to develop much higher levels of cardiovascular ...


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