10

It's important to keep one's legs in good working order for anyone who wants to retain the ability to get out of bed, climb stairs, stand up off the toilet, walk around a hilly neighborhood, run away from a fire or other emergency, or sit down to play with a child on the floor. People who are okay not being able to do these things without someone else's help ...


7

No, it doesn't hit all three shoulder heads (assuming you mean the anterior, lateral and posterior deltoids.) Breakdown of handstand push-ups. Mechanically I don't see how you can work all of the shoulder muscles unless you can encounter resistance coming from the wide range of angles the shoulder can direct force to. A gymnast routine on the rings would ...


5

You will always want to keep a balance between antagonist musclegroups. This means a strong latissimus with weak pectoralis will lead to imbalances which might negatively affect your movement and posture. Also your argument about pectoralis not being visible with clothes on is wrong. Wearing somewhat tight clothes will reveal the size very well. While you ...


4

There is more than one type of grip training available, and you want to make sure you select the right one: Pinch grip (plate pinches, etc.) Crushing grip (tennis ball, "captain's of crush") Supportive grip (deadlifts, farmer's walks) Since your stated goal is to handle more weight on deadlifts, you want to make sure you train your supportive grip. I will ...


4

I'm willing to bet you don't do single leg work at all. It's not fun, but it is necessary to deal with things like this. Single leg work that supports squats include things like the following: Split squats Lunges Single leg press Bulgarian split squats (one leg elevated on a bench) Pistols You'll want to do as many reps as you can with the strong leg, ...


4

It really isn't that big of a concern. The biggest difference in stress on the back is that the shoulders are hit slightly differently. The overhand grip spreads the weight of the bar across the whole shoulder, and the suppinated grip hits between the spine and shoulder blade. So yes, there is a slight imbalance. But a big part of it is just like your ...


3

Consider what sort of exercise you're doing by using the car. Unless you have a considerably different car than usual, it's a combination of pushing at relatively low intensity and maintaining your leg at a fully extended or mostly extended position (I personally found that, more often than not, holding the leg hovering in readiness was as much a part of the ...


3

There are several things you can do, just know that in a raw squat (no squat suit or compression briefs) the glute involvement is primarily at the bottom, and the hamstrings are only moderately used. With a squat suit, the leverages change and loading the hamstrings is more important. That said, the glute and hamstring activity is still important--...


3

To start, if you notice that you feel pain rather than a burn or soreness in your hamstrings, it may have to do with your squat stance, rather than lagging hamstrings. However, the hamstrings are more often underdeveloped compared to their quad counterparts found in front of them for most trainee's, so a muscle imbalance isn't out of the question. And while ...


3

I notice two omission from the previous well articulated answers: 2 major imbalances in muay thai are: 1) Muay thai is not a seasonal sport like wrestling or baseball -- so there is a time imbalance. There is no off-season, thus no extended unloading phase...there is not a dedicated time to do the basic strength training that @Dave recommends. Often, ...


3

The purpose of a weightlifting belt is to boost the effect of a valsalva maneuver in increasing intrathoracic pressure during heavy lifts, where that pressure is used to keep the torso rigid. You take a deep breath and hold it in against a closed throat, and then push your abs out, against the belt to increase internal pressure. The role of the belt is to ...


2

No exercises will automatically improve imbalances. It is important to work on the specific imbalance one might have. For instance, if someone is kyphotic they should certainly put more of an emphasis on rowing type movements to improve the strength of the back muscles. Doing the same amount of pushing and pulling work will not yield any change in the ...


2

I tend to descend to the left a little bit as well. Conscious effort to fix the form in a complex movement and then adding weight on top of that will probably not help the problem. I personally have found that too much conscious effort can be effective if you know for sure that you are hitting the right muscle groups because it forces them to work harder (...


2

Yes, definitely. Being a Swede where 90% of all cars are manual transmission, I see people limping about on their hideously differently sized legs all the time. I would recommend you solve it the Swedish way and get some large-right-leg inhibitors here Seriously though, no, it won't have an impact on your muscle balance, or there would be enormous problems ...


2

If you are at a stop light or a traffic jam, put the car in neutral and then release the clutch. The car won't stall, your leg won't get so tired, and it saves wear and tear on the clutch (don't forget to either set the parking brake or keep your foot on the brake, though, to keep from rolling).


2

Unilateral work will assist you in making sure you train both sides equally. And do make sure you train them equally. Training one side more than the other will only lead to another set of imbalances. That said, you should still be squatting, while being mindful of symmetry. This is of course because you still need to practice good form in order to learn ...


2

The question as to whether it is "worthwhile" is very subjective. As for safety issues and how to mollify them: Most exercises you do on the mini trampoline require you to maintain your balance. If you have balance issues, you could fall onto the frame or springs or off the equipment and hurt yourself. You have a couple of options. You can sit on the mini ...


2

Continuing the theme of free-weight work you could try the following (for 3-5 sets of 8-15 reps, tracking and increasing weight slowly over time), those in bold are strongly recommended. Outside of isolation, if you aren't doing power cleans, you should! Shoulders: Barbell Overhead Press (strict)/Push Press Dumbbell Lateral Raise Barbell Shrug Dumbbell ...


2

Bret Contreras, aka "The Glute Guy" who is known as the world's glute training expert (he literally wrote his PhD thesis on glute exercise activation) talks about how glute imbalances are very common – much more common than you’d imagine, in his article about how to fix glute imbalances. You cannot spot target fat, so whoever told you that you will burn the ...


2

From https://www.strengthandconditioningresearch.com/muscles/hamstrings/ The hamstrings are a group of four muscles on the back of the thigh. Three of them are two-joint muscles (performing both knee flexion and hip extension) while the fourth performs only knee flexion. As a group, the hamstrings can therefore be trained by exercises that involve ...


2

Actually, deadlifts do have a unilateral equivalent: the one legged deadlift, usually done with a Kettlebell. If you google it, you'll get a bunch of pictures. At my gym, it is a common exercise, ladies mostly are doing it. I myself just started practicing it a week ago. However, this is a very, very difficult exercise to do properly. There is a huge ...


2

The rule of thumb is to balance pressing work with pulling volume (so, 1:1), or if working to correct a postural issue, then double the pulling volume (1:2). But this is just a guide, and we have to remember that movement volume, like calories, is not actually a fungible quantity. We can aim for certain easily-tracked benchmarks (1 push-up :: 1 ring row) but ...


1

I would adapt the lens you're viewing this through. Going muscle by muscle, while it has merit, is much harder than viewing the movement you're trying to correct. You're already seeing that with your valid Good Morning question. Extending your example, say Good Mornings do work the hamstrings more than the lower back. They might be worthwhile for you then, ...


1

Weak middle and lower trapezius relative to pecs and front delts is a common problem that causes rounded shoulders, hunchback posture and pain in shoulders. The solution is to strengthen the middle and lower trapezius muscles using horizontal pulling movements such as seated rows and barbell rows. Walls angels trough out the day is also great to strengthen ...


1

A few things you should understand: Muscle imbalance can indeed cause long term pain or injuries so if you work out, you want to work on your entire body (and work on mental health is as important in my opinion but this ain't the place for that I guess). Also, focussing on your abs will not help on getting rid of belly fat faster. The contrary will happen. ...


1

Everyone has a more dominant side than another, and after a few years of good living most people have picked up random injuries. My left hip adductor, as an example, has some damage in it so I can never really do as much on my left side as my right. Worse, I'm right handed so I end up using my right side more for pretty much everything. Muscle imbalances ...


1

When following a strength routine, like yours (the three big lifts), you should include some optional excersices in order to have balance. Especially when you train for bodybuilding. It's prefered to be included one from the following excersises for each group per day: Back: Dumbbell Row Machine Row Shoulders: Seated or Standing Dumbbell Overhead Press ...


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