27

Look closer, sprinters have muscular everything... People tend to lump all different types of running into one category but it's more complicated than that. Marathon runners run long distances, within an aerobic heart range (ex 133 < 152 bpm for a 30yr male), maximizing distance by decreasing load as much as possible. Typically, if you do a dedicated ...


27

The main role of the arms in sprinting is to stabilize the torso and provide drive forward, especially in the start (Which is critical in 100/200m races). This stabilization allows power to be transferred through the center of mass in an efficient fashion. Since you've got to be able to oppose a significant driving force from the hips and legs, you need ...


13

While there are many different ways to approach this question, I think the best approach is from a very high-level as it gives you the proper foundation upon which you can build your exercise routine. An easy way you can understand how muscles are built is by applying Selye's Theory of the General Adaptive Syndrome. The process can be broken down into three ...


12

Consider this more as a longer comment but as an answer: Physical analysis Let my try to analyze the differences between weights and resistance bands from a "physical" point of view in two steps: free weights vs Cables and Cables vs Resistance bands: Free weights vs Cables The main difference in force production is that gravitation always points down to ...


12

There's no easy answer. It depends on a few variables: The stress you've exposed your muscles to. How close you are to your genetic potential. How good your recovery is. You (probably, based on your fitness as explained) could do 20 pushups a day, every day, and have no problems. However if you tried to push your 1RM (single maximum effort) bench press, ...


11

Physically, and as long as you don't starve during your break, the negative effects will be negligible. Mentally, I can't tell you the amount of people I know who took a short break after just a little while going to the gym and never came back.


11

Here, I made a list :) # cm^3 muscle 1 879.65 Gluteus maximus 674.00 Vastus lateralis 599.20 Adductor magnus 580.00 Vastus intermedius 5 531.90 Soleus 461.00 Vastus medialis 458.29 Gluteus medius 323.45 Rectus femoris 306.73 Psoas major 10 262.30 Latissimus dorsi 256.80 Medial gastrocnemius ...


9

I've heard/read here and elsewhere that I shouldn't be doing cardio if my ultimate goal is to gain weight. Some limited cardio can be good while weight training. Cardio helps with increasing O2 circulation, strengthens your heart, and increases endurance. However, what cardio doesn't do much of is put stress on your muscles to initiate growth. Running 5 ...


9

The first really strange thing about your results is your squat number. It is unnatural to be able to curl more than you can squat, and that's putting it mildly. Squats are probably the most important single benchmark of general strength and if you can't get your squat to go up at 20kg, you should just focus on unlocking that piece of the puzzle. To be ...


8

All the complicated science, Selye's General Adaptation Syndrome, super compensation curves, etc. point to one simple fact: unless you are doing more, you won't get bigger. If you only ever spend 15 minutes at a time under the sun, you are only going to get so tan. It would be better to restate the question like this: How can I can I increase size ...


7

I haven't been able to find any research specifically targeting a squat routine versus a different muscle group routine either, so some of this will be inference. I'd theorize that squats are designated as prime exercises simply because they are some of the largest, strongest muscles in the body, so they will have the largest overall response. This is in ...


7

Strength training builds muscle. In other words, the forcible contraction of your muscles against resistance is what stimulates them to get stronger or more firm. While stretching has a role, it's not to build or tone muscle. NOTE: the amount of body fat you have can accentuate or hide muscularity, so a certain amount of "toning" is done in the kitchen. ...


7

What you've read is false. You may not end up with a bodybuilder's body, but push ups is a fundamental exercise everybody does, whether going to a gym or not. It definitely helps you gain muscle mass as long as you keep challenging yourself and altering your workout to target different areas of your chest as well as to prevent your body from adapting to the ...


6

I'm not sure if you are an ectomorph, but whether you are eating enough or not is the question. If you are not gaining any weight the answer is no. Do you eat 6 times a day? 3 major and minor meals? Even ectomorphs do well on a high calorie diet. To gain weight you should always be on a calorie surplus diet. Do you consume enough protein? If you are a ...


6

There's more than one type of muscle mass, and training different rep ranges emphasize one over the other: Rep ranges 1-3: emphasizes myophibrilar hypertrophy (i.e. more protein pairs that actually perform muscle contractions) Rep ranges 4-6: balanced hypertrophy range (i.e. both myophibrilar hypertrophy and sarcoplasmic hypertrophy) Rep ranges 7-15: ...


6

I really didn't get serious about strength training until thirty, and if you look around you'll see people setting records and being incredibly fit in their 40's (and beyond). A good friend of mine is a spokes-model for a supplement company, and his <5% bodyfat shirtless image is on posters in a lot of supplement chain stores. He's 46 this year. In short,...


5

I don't think there could be more appropriate URL citations than what I am about to provide: how to look like Daniel Craig [nerdfitness.com] and the James Bond workout [menshealth.com]. Granted these are from 2009 when Daniel Craig was preparing for Casino Royale--not Skyfall which I suspect you are referring to--however I would say the advice is even more ...


5

According to Nate Winkler, yes. There are things you consume that can impair or improve your ability to perform in the gym or on the field. A short list is as follows: Caffeine abuse. A dose of caffeine before training can be an effective way of being able to do more. However, if you consume so much caffeine that you are no longer sensitive to it, all it ...


5

Gaining healthy weight is the same for vegetarians as it is for omnivores: lift heavy, eat big, prioritize getting bigger. The only difference is that vegetarians and vegans make it harder for themselves by not eating (or eating less of) some of the most useful foods: meat, dairy, eggs. These foods are great because high-quality versions of them contain good ...


5

As a former competitive bodybuilder, I can tell you that there is no one recipe for gaining mass. My "pros" and "cons" for a routine would not be the same for you. That's because everyone is an individual. It's all about forcing your muscles to overcome their desire to adapt to workload. One sure way to help that is to change up your training routine as ...


5

Your training really depends on your goals. There are several factors that program writers have to consider: Training effect: will this help you achieve goal X? In this case increase in muscle mass. Recovery: how quickly can someone train again if they do this routine once. Or what can they do while the body is recovering from some earlier work. As the ...


5

I would strongly consider dramatically increasing your intake of grass-fed meat. The fat can be good for you. A large grass-fed steak with a side of veggies drenched in butter from grass-fed cows is tremendously delicious, allows for great variety by changing up the choice of veggies, and is powerfully anabolic when eaten in sufficient quantities. Pastured ...


5

Muscle does not build faster than fat burns. It sounds like your main issue is not that you are not burning fat or gaining muscle, but instead you're not actually measuring those things. Your body is not entirely muscle OR fat. In turn, when you weigh yourself you are not only measuring those two factors. You're measuring fat mass and lean body mass (muscle,...


5

It's an inverse pyramid strength-training workout. Although this seems to be fairly low reps, it's used to encourage muscles to build volume. I wouldn't suggest hitting these kinds of reps though. Injuries are rampant when you load up on these weights. A more appropriate strength and volume building routine would be 10-8-6 or even 8-6-4 reps, each with ...


5

High level Olympic weight lifters suffer a ~10% loss in strength after a month of not training. Anecdotally, I'll take a week off every couple of months (by choice or chance), and if anything I get a bit more flexible and can get back into the weight room with less nagging inflammation. On the one week side, and definitely if you're out near two weeks or ...


5

No, protein supplements are made of whey protein, which is the liquid remaining after milk has been curdled and strained. It's not a synthetic product of any kind. I haven't tried the Gold brand in particular, but I can see that it's being sold by some of the most reputable sites (including here in Norway), so I see no reason doubt its quality. Your father ...


5

The shoulder muscles that contribue to the broad shape are primarily the deltoid muscles. This is the muscle that forms the bulk of the shoulder muscle mass, with three heads (Anterior, medial and posterior) that inserts on the humerus. This muscle is primarily involved with shoulder abduction, or moving the upper arm out away from the body. So for swimming,...


5

The first routine is low on overall weekly volume in terms of sessions in the gym and I would recommend if you chose this route to achieve hypertrophy what you understand that as you develop into a intermediate/advanced lifter that the time you spend in the gym during these 3 session will increase to a significant amount. Whole-body programs are designed to ...


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