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There's a lot of science behind rest days but I'm going to give you an anecdotal answer. I had personally been doing my own 5x5 and 5RM training split. Everyday was a new 5RM attempt and it was going really well. After about 10 weeks, the training days started to get really hard. Week 11 I failed my first time and week 12 I failed every day. During all 12 ...


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The answer is yes. Interrupted sleep can have negative consequences on your overall health. Health consequences of sleep disruption Therefore, a negative effect on muscle growth. During the night, your body progresses through different stages of sleep. If one stage is interrupted, your body has to reset and start going through the stages again, meaning ...


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No, urea is not the cause of the yellow colour of urine. That's urobilin, which is an end product of the breakdown of red blood cells. Urea is the body's means of disposing of metabolised amino acids, and so urea production (and need for disposal) will increase if you have a high protein diet. You'll need to urinate more to dispose of that, and drink more ...


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I have had this same issue in the past, for me pushups were just extremely uncomfortable and I was never able to hit my strength limit before I had to stop. First of all, using a punching bag for some boxing routines would be extremely beneficial for certain areas of your chest (serratus, lower outer, and upper outer chest). Most boxers rely on a strong ...


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I’m not sure that this question technically qualifies as being on topic or not, but consuming anything else will slow down the rate of digestion. So fiber, fat, or whatever else you decide to consume would do the job. I’m assuming that this question is in regards to body composition as it relates to rates of muscle protein synthesis.


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Our tolerance to training volume is certainly a function of training experience. The term training age is sometimes used to describe the total number of years over which an athlete has trained, particularly in the context of younger athletes. However, this term tends to oversimplify the problem, since our training can be contiguous or intermittent, and can ...


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There could be multiple things to look at, but to answer your question, yes.. everyone exercising needs to take a break. The more experienced you are, the more often you take breaks. Typically this "deload" is 9 to 14 days and can include your rest days so that it just feels like a week off. Generally this is done every 6 to 8 weeks. After a deload, it's not ...


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