18

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is not something you should use to gauge the efficiency of your workouts. It's mostly only experienced when your body gets put through something it's not used to. In essence, it's not anything you need to aim for. But in terms of getting variety into your workout regimen, it's a good indicator of "hey, this is new", ...


10

You hit on an important distinction between pain and recovery. Massage may very well make you feel less pain, but that does not mean it will improve your recovery. Many immediately jump to "At least it gets rid of the pain. I'm going to do it." There's a chance that backfires. Many associate pain with recovery. Less muscle soreness? "I'm more recovered." ...


9

I would recommend a balanced and proven strength training program. The typical office job tends to provide numerous posture issues and strains from being in awkward positions for hours at a time. Good strength training will simultaneously strengthen and provide flexibility across all your major muscle groups, including your shoulders, neck, and upper back. ...


8

Immediately after (like within 30 minutes or sooner) dump a bunch of protein into your system. I like chocolate milk, but anything with protein and carbs and fluid is good. This helps your body recover faster as it starts off will all the raw materials it needs. If you can handle it, a cold bath (ice cold is optimum, but very hard to take) can help reduce ...


8

Yes there are muscles between your ribs. They're called the intercostal muscles, though "soreness in ribs" might also be caused by soreness in your pectoralis minor (which connects to the front of the rib cage) or your serratus anterior (which connect your back to the side of your rib cage). A good hint that it's muscle soreness instead of connective tissue ...


8

I cant diagnose you but a doctor might be able to identify if you have any of the following: I think you may have Thoracic Kyphosis/Forward Head ("Computer Guy" Hunchback): Upper cross syndrome is another posture issue caused by sitting while hunching forward (at a computer, over books, etc). The pectorals and the upper back/next tend to be tight, while ...


7

If the pain is in the joint, it is likely to be an inflammation based problem known as tendinitis. Tendinitis happens when you have bad form, inadequate warmup, poor equipment, and/or unbalanced work. There is likely some swelling, even if it's not visible on the surface. For the most immediate relief, the protocol I use is: Compress the joint--should ...


7

The soreness that you experience is called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). What causes it? When you exercise, the muscles get damaged. That damage is a signal for the muscle to grow and get stronger. That signal stimulates inflammation. Any inflammatory process produces local pain. Why is it delayed? It takes a day or two for the training-induced ...


6

You started squatting more so you would get better at squatting. It sounds like your plan is working. You're better at squatting since you squat more. One part of being better at squatting is that squatting doesn't make you sore. Two concerns: one, it's not clear what you mean by "attempted squat 5 failed attempts", which sounds a bit reckless. Two, if your ...


5

You can find a lot of great information online - search for "recovery nutrition". There are two areas that are important: First, you need to rehydrate, unless you are one of those rare people who actually drinks enough to stay hydrated on the ride. Second, you need to replace your carbohydrate stores. There is a "golden window" after the end of exercise (...


5

It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), and is a natural consequence of changing either intensity or volume on anything you are doing. It's temporary, and once you get used to the new regular workload you won't get it anymore. It has no effect on your ability to train or carry any risk of injury. It's simply uncomfortable. A little information ...


5

Muscle soreness is not an indicator of overtraining. Go ahead and work out.


5

It's likely all the bench-pressing that you're doing. Too much volume: 10x10 is a very high-volume program. Most lifters stick to around 3x10 or 4x8 for hypertrophy. It also might be a muscle imbalance. Your pectorals are stronger than your back-muscles, and it's screwing with the (very complicated) structures in your shoulders. Take a break from benching ...


5

DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) is primarily something you feel when you stretch out the eccentric portion of the exercise. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delayed_onset_muscle_soreness) Excerpt: The soreness is caused by eccentric exercise, that is, exercise consisting of eccentric (lengthening) contractions of the muscle The "eccentric ...


5

To build on Eric's comment; the best advice is to follow a workout program that is tried and true. If you're trying to make your own program, and you find yourself having to ask this question, you should probably not be making your own program in the first place. To make your own program is something you do when you know your body very well, and you know ...


5

This honestly just sounds like a case of DOMS. What is that? “Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness”, it’s a side effect training muscles more than normal. DOMS is a sign that your muscles are breaking down, and if you provide your body with sufficient protein, then they will rebuild themselves to be stronger and bigger. DOMS is not necessary for muscle growth, but ...


4

This is a result of bad form. Your butt is probably sticking up the air. Your achilles tendon and hamstrings are becoming sore because they are being stretched during your holds. First of all look at your body position. to start, lay down chin towards the floor, toes downward, directly downward, and rest on your elbows using your shoulder girdle to ...


4

The only thing DOMS has indicated routinely is: I'm working my muscles differently than I have before (usually a new variation of exercise) I've significantly increased either the intensity or volume of my training It only comes while your body is getting used to doing work. When you gradually increase volume or intensity, you may not get any DOMS or it ...


4

For the sake of vocabulary, I think you're talking about "training recovery". There is short term recovery, like the time you need between sets, but you mentioned supercompensation so you're talking about something more like: I just did a bunch of compound barbell lifts, how long until my body will be stronger because of the exercise? You can get some ...


4

I think most popular and effective training programs do not allow you to recover fully. Recovering fully, being at peak power and endurance, is usually achieved by tapering off your training. As such, simply by the fact that you'd taper off a training program (like 5/3/1, 5x5, etc) before a competition, it's a logical conclusion that not tapering off (ie: ...


4

I would recommend doing something, to second Alex here, for active recovery. I would avoid running and do some skip rope instead and after you properly warmed up, you can do your other exercise. The body is a unit and you will be using your hamstrings with the other exercises anyway indirectly. You should be really sure that it is really soreness that you ...


4

Per your request in your comments, I'd refer you to my answer to a similar question pertaining to ab training. As I indicated in the answer from the referenced post, DOMS is not a valid indicator of progress or muscle growth. Studies have shown that there's no causal relationship between DOMS/EIMD and muscle hypertrophy or "progress". You should look for ...


4

You're talking about two different things. The pain you experience during or right after the exercise is called acute muscle soreness: Acute muscle soreness is the pain felt in muscles during and immediately after strenuous physical exercise. The pain appears within a minute of contracting the muscle and it will disappear within two or three minutes or up ...


3

According to Wikipedia, DOMS doesn't cause muscle growth; both are simply unrelated effects that occur from a single source: working the muscles harder than they are used to. Other effects include reduced range of motion, swelling, and immediate reduced strength DOMS varies amongst individuals; some recover fast while others recover slower. And yes, a warm ...


3

Instead of considering what you are doing right you should be focusing on what the people you are describing are doing right. Do these people actually exist? If so, what are they doing? It sounds like you've done what a lot of beginners do: Jump around with different things until you find something that makes you magically strong. You should instead be ...


3

The obliques mildly assist in flexion of the torso, and part of their attachments include the sheath of the rectus abdominus (abdominal muscle) and the linea alba (tendonous side attachment that serves as a connection and brace for the external oblique and abdominus). The primary thing that they are going to be doing during your deadlift is stabilizing the ...


3

Recover no matter what you do. If you are not sure if it has been long enough, start with your warm ups. If you feel better while warming up, go ahead into your workout. If you have been eating right and resting, then you should be o.k.


3

If you're not seeing muscle increase in your arms, it's either you're not working the muscles hard enough or you're using bad forms. You don't necessarily need to change your routine. First, check your forms and ensure that you're lifting the weights appropriately. That might require you watching a lot of videos and practise in order to use the proper ...


3

Soreness (DOMS: Delayed onset muscle soreness) is not a good indicator of work effort. Check out this answer for more info, specifically on the types of things that cause DOMS and the things that don't. If you want sore triceps, do heavy skull crushers. If you want sore hamstrings, (carefully) do good mornings. They make you sore because they are eccentric: ...


3

Muscle soreness is irrelevant to muscle growth. It's just a sign you haven't exercised these particular muscles recently. Provided you've had enough rest and good calorie intake in the last few days, you are more than good to go and do the exercises. It's not a good idea to do it if you've done any intense leg exercise in the last ~72 hours. Spend 5 min ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible