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2

In short yes, the percentage of slow/fast fibres will vary with muscle group. Pectoralis major tends to be about 60% fast-twitch fibres. "Legs" is a bit of a generalisation - your soleus, in common with other postural muscles, is predominantly slow-twitch fibres, other leg muscles contain more fast-twitch fibres (taken from this study): Soleus 70% ...


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Yes it is possible for two people of similar builds to have different flexibilities and I simply think this is because the amount of stretching and the consistency and repetition of that stretching. I doubt it's something that is a natural occurrence, it's like confidence, there's no way you can be born with it. If you take a look at gymnasts and how they do ...


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I like a number of the answers above (in particular the one from @user31548). One other thing that I'd like to add is that some people get stronger more than they get bigger. I look reasonably fit, but not like the guy you call to move a fridge. I can lift more than you'd think by looking at me. Using more or less the same programs, intensity,... other ...


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TLDR If you want something to grow, work it hard. If you want it to not-shrink, work it at least a little. More details The only way I can interpret your question in a way that makes sense to me is "When I'm not exercising a variety of muscles, is there any way to control which of them degrades first/fastest?". Is that what you're asking? ...


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Bending forwards: Rectus abdominis (the "6 pack" muscle) Bending backwards: Erector spinae group (the muscles running up your back either side of the spine) Bending sideways: Abdominal oblique muscles (these are on the sides, in two layers, running between the hips, rib cage, and the centre of the abs) Twisting: Also abdominal oblique muscles


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So basically you have three types of muscle fibre: Type I (slow-twitch) Type IIa (fast oxidative) Type IIx (fast glycolytic) Most people are generally born with roughly a 50/50 split between types I and II. Top level endurance athletes can have up to 90-95% type I fibres, whereas strength/power athletes can have 60-80% type II. It's generally believed that ...


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An efficient squatter mainly uses the glutes to extend the hips, not the hamstrings. As can be seen from this image the hamstrings crosses both the hip and knee joint: They therefore have two functions: extending the hips and flexing the knee. If you use the hamstrings to extend the hips in the squat you also get a flexing torque at the knee. This means ...


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I think this question has more to do with why a person with a lot of fast-twitch muscle types have higher stamina. Especially if you pair it with this question. First, there are actually three types of muscle fibers. Type 1 (slow-twitch), type 2a (fast-twitch), and Type 2b (super-fast-twitch. Also called Type 2x). Type 2a is kind of an in between between ...


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I'm not able to answer your question definitely, but here's a thought experiment with squats. Strong person has a squat PR of 200kg Weak person has a squat PR of 40kg Who do you think will manage more reps with a weight of 40kg? So i'd say, all else equal then yes, the stronger person also has more stamina.


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We need to clarify some terms. "Extension" means movement of a joint which increases the angle between two body parts. So elbow extension is the movement that increases the angle between the humerus and radius/ulna, i.e. straightening the elbow. The opposite of extension is "flexion", which is a movement of a joint which decreases the ...


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I imagine it has something to do with him being a full-time professional athlete with multiple full-time coaches optimizing his training.


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