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10

Forward head posture (called gravity induced kyphosis) is pretty common nowadays. The first thing you should do is begin stretching your neck with an exercise called neck retraction: You'll be amazed at how great this exercise feels. If you've been stuck in forward head posture for a long time, you'll feel as though your entire upper spine is waking up. ...


10

A double-chin is a collection of fat, so in order to get rid of it, you need to reduce the amount of fat. Now, there is no way to target where you want to burn fat. You burn it all over your body, or nowhere at all. Thus, the best way to get rid of double-chins, is to take a look at your diet, which is the number one way to reduce fat naturally. If, after ...


9

I would recommend a balanced and proven strength training program. The typical office job tends to provide numerous posture issues and strains from being in awkward positions for hours at a time. Good strength training will simultaneously strengthen and provide flexibility across all your major muscle groups, including your shoulders, neck, and upper back. ...


8

I cant diagnose you but a doctor might be able to identify if you have any of the following: I think you may have Thoracic Kyphosis/Forward Head ("Computer Guy" Hunchback): Upper cross syndrome is another posture issue caused by sitting while hunching forward (at a computer, over books, etc). The pectorals and the upper back/next tend to be tight, while ...


7

There can be many reasons for muscle spasms/pulls in the neck area, including (in no particular order): Insufficient food: the muscles lack the glycogen stores required and overcompensate Insufficient sleep: your nervous system is impacted when you are in a sleep deprived state, and I've had most of the neck spasm issues when in this state Bad hydration: ...


6

This has happened to me a lot over the years. I found it was caused by tightness of the levator scapulae and middle and upper trapezius and a weak lower trapezius and serratus. All largely sorted through fixing muscular imbalances, using a mixture of self myofascial release and targeted resistance work on the weak areas. Release tension in pec major/minor, ...


6

Don't Sit All Day Sitting hunched over a desk or laptop all day is not good for you. At a minimum, take regular breaks throughout the day: walk around the building, get some water, stretch your arms, roll out your neck and ankles, do a few lunges, sit in a third world squat for thirty seconds: Configure a standing desk, but don't stand all day either: ...


5

Rolling the neck is contraindicated because it can hyperextend and compress the cervical vertebrae and cause nerve damage over time. You can let your chin just kind of hang your your chest, and lean your head to the side (Think touching your ear to your shoulder) as recommended neck stretches. As you advance, you can add a gentle traction to the side ...


4

Their answers hold weight... I've noticed the pull or tear when the weight was a little heavy or a lot heavy. Also every time you actually move your head forward or look down to do the weight, it's possible to strain or tear it. Keep good posture, eyes forward and head straight. Stabilize or don't use your neck while moving the weight.


4

My susceptibility to neck strains decreased significantly after I started focusing on overhead mobility. For me that meant overhead presses, overhead squats, one-arm overhead pressing while in a squat, plus—and this is important—all the mobility work necessary to support those exercises. I suspect that other methods of increasing stability overhead would ...


3

Thoracic Kyphosis and Forward Head ("Computer Guy" Hunchback): Upper cross syndrome is another posture issue caused by sitting while hunching forward (at a computer, over books, etc). Pectorals and the upper back/next tend to be tight as a result and the scapular muscles (shoulder blades) and neck flexors tend to be weak. This post has excellent ...


3

I wanted to join the commentary because I too started having upper back problems around my shoulders and neck when I entered my 30s**. I spent a full year trying a number of different things including going to a chiropractor, seeing my doctor, and going to numerous physical therapy sessions before I finally found a regimen that worked for me. Here is what I ...


3

In my opinion, those head straps look kinda dorky. but you could try it, if you don't want to buy one you could always make one with a small plate, rope and a headband or vest tied around your head etc. Maybe you could use resistance bands somehow? Generally stretches and mobilty work will do wonders, things like Neck rotation, extension/flexion, chin tuck. ...


3

The best bodyweight substitution for a weighted shrug is just a shrug from the inverted hang (aka inverted shrug): This can be done on rings, straight bar, or even parallel bars:


3

The best way is to slowly, gently stretch and strengthen different muscles at the same time. For example: push the chin down (that firms the front of the neck) and at the same time, pull the throat backwards (that lengthens the back of the neck) push the throat forward, lift the chin up (lengthens the front, firms the back) When turning the head sideways, ...


2

I would, too, advise to explore some gentle form of movement as Dave suggested earlier in his comment. If you are looking for motivation and a starting point, this might be a good one: http://grimmly2007.blogspot.hu/2009/06/developing-practice-part-23-then-and.html


2

Neck training is really important for your health and posture. Daily activities such as driving and sitting in front of a computer cause your head to slightly lean forward and your neck to go out of alignment. In time, this contributes to a poor posture and makes the muscles and ligaments in your neck and shoulders stretch. Permanent tension in this area can ...


2

My qualification for answering this I am no fitness expert beside being involved in sports even before teen years. In my teens and early adult life i would train 4 to 6 days a week, until I started working. I am also a software developer, and been in industry for way more than an hand full so I can relate easily to you. Short answer Yes. Anything is way ...


2

Yes. You may not be able to achieve perfect smoothness, but you can tighten things up over time. Begin by stretching your jaw for about ten minutes every morning, opening and shutting, moving side to side. This must be done slowly as to avoid stress on the temporomandibular joint- if you feel a crackling sensation, you are going too wide. You can get your ...


2

As this can have chronic implications if not corrected, I feel an obligation to respond. Clinically I commonly see variants of this presentation. Note: Without a full assessment by a physical therapist you will not have the full picture of what's going on, however this is most common culprit. In your case the muscles between your shoulder blades (...


2

Some of the yoga poses listed below should help with some muscle relief. Some may seem to be more shoulder-muscle related but should help to relax the neck and jaw muscles. When you start to feel the muscle tension begin, take a deep breath in, then as you exhale, relax your shoulders, as if someone is trying to press the shoulders down away from the ears. ...


2

A 2004 article from The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association, Sternocleidomastoid syndrome: A case study followed the diagnosis and treatment of a patient with your symptoms. The study found that posture may play a part in the occurrence of symptoms, and, exercises were recommended for that. Additionally, during a 4 week treatment phase, the ...


2

Genetics plays a part, sure, but a man with an average neck can surely develop a thick muscular neck. I saw this first hand during the time I played rugby. My fellow team mates used to do 3 sets of 3 different exercises specifically aimed for the trapezius and neck muscles every two days! I assure you that you will gain a significant amount of neck ...


2

There's some truth to the "calves are genetic" argument, but your genetics impact muscle development across your body so it's not specific to your calves. Your biceps could be loaded with slow twitch fibers as well, as an example. Further, there's a surprising correlation to people making excuses about their calves and people who don't do cleans. ...


2

Welcome to my world! Like you I'm in my thirties (okay so it's more late thirties these days) and I have osteoarthritis in my neck (C1 -> C7), and I know all too well the headaches that come with it! What has worked for me is Yoga - I do a "full" (1hr+) practice perhaps two-three times a week but do gentle neck rolls and side neck stretches at least daily - ...


2

@yake84 I experience neck pain myself, but not headaches. Gwendolene Jull is the expert on neck pain and cerviogenic headaches. Listen to her here. I encourage you to read her scholarly research articles. Now, I'm going to throw out a topic that is worth thinking about: There is quite a bit of interest in the relationship between co-contraction and neck ...


1

In some ways, tucking your chin in may be equivalent to performing a behind the neck press when considering the movement plane of the shoulders and arms. I can tell you from anecdotal experience, that the behind the neck press is contraindicated once you've experienced a rotator cuff tear. And, while a recent study in the Journal of Sport and Health ...


1

I wouldn't exclude exercises, if the muscles get weaker or less use, then they will probably be less able to handle the daily stress of working at a computer station and typing. I'm a computer programmer, and I'm a frequent swimmer, so that adds up to the same kind of neck and trapezius soreness/knots that you talk about. I try to combat it in two ways ...


1

I used to have a lot of neck problems from playing the saxophone. Two things helped. Don't bend your neck to do your work, adjust your screen and your chair until you can sit comfortably. Take time to do this properly. Adjust and use the armrests. Read the ergonomic guides and believe them. Ask the fitness studio guy for exercises to help your special ...


1

Sitting is quite literally killing you. There is a long thread of answers over here related to fixing the damage that comes from long term computer work. It took months and years to cause the damage, and it will take months and years to repair it fully. You can't stretch and play around with some dumbbells for a couple of weeks and expect anything remotely ...


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