7

I'd like to break down a few things first which I think might help to explain what I think is going on with your situation. First off, great work on starting with chinups / pullups. They are a terrific compound exercise that works basically everything from your mid back to your fingers. Bicep curls on the other hand are maybe not the most absurd exercise, ...


4

I've personally never altered my diet for anything shorter than a marathon (my current half PR is 1:29). The purpose of increasing carbs for longer distances (runs longer than 2 hours) is to maximize glycogen stores. I would be skeptical that your body would actually need any extra stores for a run lasting less than 2 hours. A sensible diet of 60-70% carbs ...


3

Jam, chocolate (candy), syrup, and sugar cereal (most) in significant daily quantities may ultimately increase your insulin resistance and thus risk of diabetes and other health conditions along with fat gain and greater difficulty losing it. Salami, Cheese, and Peanut-butter (most have lower sugar with beneficial nutrients) are the healthier choices here ...


3

To answer your question: Why is coconut milk used so much by sportsmen and women? Nutritional content: As you rightly asserted, there is a high quantity of saturated fat this is due to the high level of coconut oil, The FDA, WHO, ICoN, DHHS, ADA, AHA, British NHS, and DoC recommend against consuming in significant amounts due to its high levels of ...


3

There's a few things regarding supplement companies that you need to understand: They over promise and under deliver The majority of your results will be from a proper diet and exercise The less information you can get from the manufacturer's web site, the less you should trust them It appears that Musclecore X uses certain BCAAs, namely arganine to "...


3

When searching for a food, add the keyword "gram". Example: grams carrot, grams apple, ect Typically the serving size is 100 grams, but you can change it to 1 gram.


2

Once again, people mistake correlation for causation. Your body is very capable of adjusting, and you won't "retain" water for any longer than it takes the body to process the extra sodium out of the body. It's a very transitory process. If you would like to read some literature, here are two studies, one on acute ingestion of sodium and phosphate, and one ...


2

While I agree with Greg, I did some digging and came up with this information: An extra 400 milligrams of sodium in your body results in a 2-pound weight increase. Now, to me, this statistic is questionable, as the author does not site a source, and 2 pounds seems like a lot for that amount, but I cannot find any other discussion which offers a number, so ...


2

You have to keep in mind the following: 1 gram of fat yields 9 calories 1 gram of carbohydrate yields 4 calories 1 gram of protein yields 4 calories so for the food you are eating: Carbohydrates - 75g ==>75*4 = 300 cal Proteins - 6g ==>6*4 = 24 cal Fat - 15g ==>15*9 = 135 cal ==>Carb+protein+fat gives total calories = 300+24+135 = 459 cal ...


2

If you could do 5 chin-ups 4 months ago, then didn't work out for three months, then you started doing curls, I think you just got weaker from not working out. Curls won't necessarily improve your pull-up performance dramatically. 10kg dumbbells are way, way lighter than you are, for example. If you want to be able to do pull-ups, do pull-ups. The ...


2

There's some context from a comment of yours that's missing from this post: I don't count calories. I simply try to follow a lifelong habit of no fast carbs or refined wheat, no sugar, no alcohol, lots of fruits and some vegetables, olive oil, fish and lean meat and I try to include some extra protein in all meals (a couple of extra egg whites and ham ...


2

Let me set a fine line: It isn't really THAT useful at all to drink a sports drink AFTER you go for a run. That sports drink stuff is supposed to give you energy to go running, not to recover. Besides, it is probably loaded with artificial sugars, anyway. I would suggest drinking water, milk, and protein shakes after a run, not a sports drink.


2

If you look at the breakdown, it's got 364 calories per 100 grams, with 78.2 grams of sugar. So you're basically getting 312 calories directly from sugar substrates (dextrose and saccharose as well as maltodextrose). Also, the advertising tag line states that it's designed to be light in the mouth "during sports", not after. During, you want enough calories ...


1

At first calculate your Basal metabolic rate. For your height and weight it will be ~1600 cal/day, I don't know your age. Then add how many calories you burn doing basic activities. There are many ways to do this. For example multiply BMR with 1.2 points for a person who does little to no exercise 1.37 points for a slightly active person who does light ...


1

As far as I know, there's no logic behind that belief. Historically speaking, some preservatives have since been proven to have potential negative effects. We no longer pack our meat in cakes of salt. We know that burning the outside of the meat preserves it, but also produces carcinogens. And, of course, we now know that packaging our food inside lead ...


1

The answer is... it depends. The little to no carb approach you mention is known as ketosis after the ketones produced by the liver when the body utilises fat stores for energy instead of carbohydrates and has been shown to be beneficial for a variety of things from fat loss to aiding focus and concentration to increasing life expectancy by cutting down ...


1

At (250 lbs) 113kg you are obese. To lose weight you need to eat below the amount of calories you need for a day. Once you are 17 you are medically classified as an adult by most doctors and are heading towards the end of your growth (more so as a male). Calorie restriction below 1500 is not recommended for any healthy male of any height and is the bottom ...


1

First of all the discrepancies doesnt stem from one single factor; all of your suggestions for explanations of the discrepancie are a part of the puzzle. With that said the major source is probably the TDEE estimate. The discrepancie from the TDEE estimate might stem from you being an outlier, it might be that your intepretation of activity level differs ...


1

Not useful at all. The reason to drink an isotonic drink is to get water and calories onboard during exercise. Isotonic means that it is at the same concentration as your blood so you're neither osmotically extracting water from your blood to dilute it so you can absorb it nor leaving nutrients behind because the concentration couldn't be affected. ...


1

Let me preface this by saying that what I’m about to share is somewhat opinion based (on experience) and laced with anecdotal evidence. I've watched this post and initially hesitated in jumping in with an answer. I think there may be some general misconceptions running through this thread. I've actually lived the bodybuilding lifestyle as a competitor, ...


1

Bulking and cutting is a staple of the body building community, and on forums primarily devoted to aesthetics you'll find a lot of information supporting them. Although less commonly talked about, the cycles of bulking and cutting fit quite nicely with anabolic steroid use. With something like deca/tren, a 12 week cycle is normally used, and you'll notice ...


1

Would definitely agree with Eric, and I would have added on to his comment but I'm new on here :) If you're isolating and smashing your biceps several times a week you should ask yourself if you're giving yourself ample time to fully recover - I had a similar problem in years gone by but I was also making it worse because my body was building up a kind of ...


1

There are two artificial sweeteners in this product: sucralose, and acesulfame potassium (also known as Ace-K). The purpose of using two sweeteners is to get a better sugar-like taste profile than with a single sweetener alone. You can read the relevant Wikipedia articles on these substances, but suffice it to say that neither one is really all that good ...


1

Actually, Aspartame has a pretty clear bill of health. There were some early studies which suggested that megadoses, the equivalent of slamming 40-50 diet sodas every day, might lead to a slight increase in cancer rates, but better studies have eliminated confounding factors and found that the risk is less than that of using natural sugars in food due to the ...


1

There is no authoritative answer. Science and authority don't mix very well, but you can still have an authoritative answer to some question when the vast majority of scientists have come to the same conclusion. This happens when the known facts leave no room for other answers. In case of nutrition this is certainly not the case. Therefore the best you can ...


1

The scooped out bagel is the dumbest thing I've ever seen (Why not just cut it in half again instead of scooping out the middle? Are you stuffing it with something after scooping it out?). People are way too concerned with the amount of calories they are eating when they should be concerned about the type of calories they are eating. If you're concerned ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible