13

Don't worry about it. My gym has had an InBody scanner for a few years now, so I've had a bit of experience with them. Assuming it's the same model as the one I'm used to, it uses bio-electrical impedance to measure your fat / muscle percentages. The problem with these is that, although you believe you're keeping all other variables the same, it's just not ...


9

Your question is very general, and will therefore only attract general answers, so this will be that. Fixing posture While you don't mention this yourself, C.Lange makes a good point about posture in the comments. To elaborate, it's clear from your second picture (shoulders from the side), that your shoulders are slumped forward and your neck has a sort of ...


8

This is not really going to be a definitive answer, as you can find studies that support almost any position, so what I'm looking at for this is the trend of the studies that I've reviewed. Overall, I am finding that there are more studies that show soy protein does not have a detrimental effect on free testosterone, especially when connected to a ...


5

Bioelectrical impedance analysis of body composition can give quite variable results, and in particular is known to be affected by water and food intake independent of body composition. So I wouldn't trust the numbers it's given you. If you're aiming to maintain or increase muscle mass though, you'll need to be resistance training. (You said your current ...


4

Great question. Consuming protein through out the day on training and non training days will allow your body to state in a positive nitrogen balance. This is important for tissue repair and growth. So yes, you can have a protein shake on non training days. Protein shakes are not necessary... even on training days... but shakes make it convenient to ...


4

Echoing some of what David already said, much of this is an educated guess and everyone is different. In regards to the ratios changing, dietary protein demands to maintain lean mass will decrease as total calories increase. So protein goes down (18% of calories) as calories go up in the gaining scenario you present above. Grams of fat and carbs go up in ...


4

The basic idea of an energy gel is to help maintain your blood sugar levels without you having to stop to eat something. It has to be easy to swallow and to digest. Our body absorbs simple carbohydrates faster than complex ones. If a particular gel has different types of carbohydrates (like glucose, maltodextrin, fructose, etc.), you'll absorb them even ...


3

I think you should still learn a bit about biology/chemistry/biochemistry and perhaps ask on another site, but I don't see why you shouldn't get an answer here. I'm not going to go into great detail and explain the inner workings of the universe to you here. If you want to learn more about biochemistry or so, it might be the best to ask someplace else. Let's ...


3

A true calorie deficit will ALWAYS result in weight loss, so the short answer to this question is "forever". However, the long answer is going to be more nuanced. See, our bodies don't want us to starve to death so there are compensatory mechanisms that take place to prevent us from rapidly approaching death. These compensatory mechanisms decrease our ...


3

To answer your question directly, there is no inherent difference between plant and animal amino acids. If the amino acid profile of one source is identical to another, its potential value or utility is also identical. Most amino acid are, after all, created by plants, and subsequently consumed and utilised by the grazing and foraging animals that we farm ...


3

First of all, quit the low carb diet and switch to a balanced one (also here). You don't really need to eat anything special before workout, just eat anything that you can easily digest. For muscle growth you could add some protein (albumin and whey protein for example). For weight loss you should avoid fat and sugar. Skipping breakfast is fine too, but it ...


3

Yes, these amounts are very likely determined through what is just a "best guess". There's no consensus on what is an optimal macro split for any particular goal, only guidelines, and what is truly optimal is likely to vary from person to person, and will be very difficult to determine with any accuracy. So these calculators do the best they can, which is ...


3

But I what I don’t get is why these other factors are not significant: the energy in through your lungs, by breathing You do not actually get energy from breathing. You get oxygen, which is used by muscles, organs, etc in the continuous cycle of breaking down food or fat into usable energy or storage. (Think of it as gas for the body). The basic path is ...


2

You get energy into your body by food that contains caloric nutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, fats, alcohol). Chemically speaking, you also get energy from breathing in oxygen, but this is not "additional" energy, because it is already calculated in the caloric values of the foods. So, the caloric value of the food is energy that is released when it reacts ...


1

Carbohydrate intake will certainly affect your training, as compared with the fasting state. To provide a personal anecdote, if one of my athletes was struggling to perform during her morning session, it was invariably because she had not eaten, and she would simply be unable to complete the workout with the intensity that we were expecting. I would send her ...


1

TL;DR: 18 y/o male, 140lbs, 5'8", don't really work out, asocial, stressed and depressed. I'm looking to gain insight on my body and health advice. Insights on dietary habits would be super useful here! What we consume is an incredibly important consideration when we start a wellness journey. Especially since you mentioned being stressed and depressed; ...


1

Bear in mind that cardio is not great for building muscle mass anyway. In fact depending on the type of cardio you're doing it may reduce your muscle mass slowly anyway, especially as you get older. If you really want to increase muscle mass you'll need to get more weights involved and do a bit less cardio. Try switching some of your cardio sessions to more ...


1

At first calculate your Basal metabolic rate. For your height and weight it will be ~1600 cal/day, I don't know your age. Then add how many calories you burn doing basic activities. There are many ways to do this. For example multiply BMR with 1.2 points for a person who does little to no exercise 1.37 points for a slightly active person who does light ...


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