8

Jean-Patrick Millette on Firstpull.net calls this an example of individualization of technique: Elite lifters do have what we might consider kinks or a special routine/behavior towards the lifts. To us, they could be detrimental, but to these lifters these behaviors an integral part of their technique. There is something about lifting very heavy weights ...


6

General Advice When I was learning the lifts, my first step was always to read the entire Starting Strength chapter on that lift, then re-skim it the next day I was doing the lift. The book is quite dense, and multiple reads enhance its utility greatly. I strongly recommend reading and rereading that chapter of the book. Make time for it. As to the power ...


6

This is more an answer to "what are the prerequisites for training using Olympic lifts", but I expect you will find it useful since you are coming from a conventional weight training background. The Olympic lifts are great, but they are highly technical, so you will really benefit from a strong foundation. 1) Ensure you have adequate flexibility to avoid ...


5

Laziness? There's not much risk of injury or loss of balance if smaller plates move around, having to take the collar on and off when doing drop/up sets is a pain when you are on a schedule.


5

Ridigity is only one issue. Center of mass is the other, and unless such a contraption either has negligible mass, or has its center of mass in the plane of movement, it will induce additional torque at the point where the lifter grasps it. This torque may be large enough to cause significant discomfort if not outright injury. Even if your device could be ...


5

I'm no expert, but I trained oly lifts for a while. My best power clean was 265lbs at 6'1", 190lbs. I can give you anecdotes and tips, for what they're worth. It takes quite a while to start getting comfortable with the clean. It took at least some months for me, possibly 3 or 4 before I started trying to progressively overload. I didn't want to go ...


4

When switching to power cleans and/or front squats for the first time you will start to notice that many areas of your body are not very flexible. This will adjust over time, however I would recommend that you do supplementary stretching. I am a big fan of Glenn Pendlay's videos when it comes to Olympic lifting, and this one is most appropriate for you.


4

I had a tough time learning cleans, but they're really awesome to master and unlocking the olympic lifts feels like getting accepted into a barbell fraternity. As a frame of reference, watch this youtube on a slow motion of clean and jerk. I have a hard time doing the explosive pull (the third step when you are effectively doing an upright row). Do I ...


4

Fixing these kinds of postural asymmetries isn't just a matter of mobility, but of simultaneously tightening up muscles on the other side. This can involve a lot of specialized mobility work along with unilateral corrective strength work. And just like how one a runner increases their susceptibility to injury in the short term by improving their running form,...


3

From the point of a physicist, no, it would definitely not be the same. I cannot think of any position for that this would be stable, without taking much effort. Above the head: Keeping the fancybar in a stable position above your head will need much of balancing out, since the bar will strive to a position with less potential energy, if you allow it. It ...


3

I can't speak for weightlifting as I'm by no means educated on it all. In regards to powerlifting though, there is a general theory of 'you are x height so should compete in x weight class'. It's not to suggest if you are 6'4 you can ONLY be competitive in the super heavy weight class it's just a general observation of majority bigger athletes usually ...


3

It seems that you either started too low on StrongLifts, or you are indeed a beginner based on continuing to make progress on the program. You'll only benefit from exhausting your beginner gains in a linear based program like this. You'll be able to go back much stronger for your Olympic lifts. In the meantime, to avoid losing technical proficiency, I'd ...


3

Because muscles can get stronger without getting bigger. That's it. The lifter is the same size, but because they lifted progressively heavier weights over time without eating such that they gained size, they can lift more weight.


3

First, Olympic weightlifting is extremely technical, and the development of strength for Olympic weightlifting is, to an enormous degree, a function of technical mastery. For the layperson and spectator, there may appear to be little difference between the performances of an amateur and a world-class professional, but imperceptible (to the non-expert) ...


2

Perhaps just the max height for a single box jump/vertical jump (if you don't want technique to be a factor for improvement). I'm hoping/expecting that your setup allows you to increase height. I have a friend who was box jump training for a bit, he gained a few inches over maybe 2-3 months of intensive training. But I think doubling your box jump height is ...


2

You are asking about measuring two different metrics. One is power/explosiveness, the other is endurance. Technique is a factor, but really only measurable in the initial phases, which it sounds like you are past that point already. While I have no personal experience with training box jumps, other than as occasional plyometric exercises in the dojangh, I ...


2

The honest answer is that if you want to be good, you need to be coached, there's no way around it. That's awesome that your clean is good, as that motion can take a while to nail. But if you want to compete (even just locally) or start shooting for competitive weight levels, you'll need a coach in your area. It's frankly impossible to Olympic lift without ...


2

If doing a program similar to StrongLifts is important to you, consider buying the Starting Strength book and following its program. It is similar to StrongLifts, but more detailed and includes the power clean. Also consider following an Olympic-lifting-specific program, like something from Catalyst Athletics (see other resources from them) or the Glenn ...


2

The most successfull general body type for Olympic lifters (especially lighter weight classes) is an Endomporph. Endomorphs are characterized as having short limbs and more normal length torsos, which will appear longer. In effect giving the appearance of a long back


2

Try the squat without shoes and if you cant get down or are falling backwards you might have to work on flexibility of the achilles tendon. For general squating flexibility gobblet-squats are great. http://breakingmuscle.com/kettlebells/how-to-do-the-perfect-goblet-squat For working on the achilles flexibility you should do some of these exercises: http://...


2

Yes, deadlift improvements can contribute to squat improvements. Both of these barbell movements train the back and legs. However, please consider "The First Three Questions" whenever you see less progress than you want or expect. By the way: The squat cannot be spotted properly by a single person; two people are required -- one for each end of the ...


2

In addition to laziness, I’ve seen this done in meets to save time (and the loaders’ grips) when the bar is being gradually loaded with many incremental increases.


2

From personal experience from a couple of gyms (and admittedly this may not always be the case), if the plates are smaller rubber ones, then they actually fit very tightly onto the bar so despite the dynamic nature of the Olympic lifts, there's virtually zero horizontal movement of the plates during the lift. I've seen smaller metal plates (1.25kg, 2.5kg) ...


2

There are a few different variables that make the “style”. For instance, there is the dynamic start vs static start| starting hip/ back angles| hip/back angle at the hip | if you are making contact/ where is the contact if there is| weight distribution through the lift| catapult/triple extension | etc. The easiest to probably to see is start type: Static ...


1

High rep hypertrophy work will not only retain muscle, but will also condition your musculature to get ready for heavy lifting after the break. Lifting in only low rep ranges is suboptimal, especially since you are a beginner. Every good strength training program has a hypertrophy phase in the beginning. In fact, I believe this is an excellent opportunity ...


1

1) If you will not have access to heavier weights, I think you will likely have to increase your rep range. Another thing that you can do is look for exercise modifications that will increase the difficulty of the exercise, which may allow you to use the weights available for you. For example, you could try replacing the DB Lunge with a DB Elevated Split ...


1

Deloading should, ideally, be planned and deliberate part of a training cycle. It typically happens every 4-8 weeks depending on fitness level and training intensity. The idea is to give the body an extended period of recovery and be completely fresh to start a new training cycle. You can typically tell when it's coming time because you'll start feeling ...


1

I'd recommend that you pick the muscles you think are lacking and work those. Small Biceps? 4x10-15 (4 sets of 10-15 reps) of Hammer/Barbell Curls. Tiny shoulders? 4x10-15 of Strict Press/Face Pulls/Lat Raises Flat Chest? 4x10-15 of Cable fly/Incline Bench. You get the idea, just pick an exercise (ExRx has good resource on which exercises work which ...


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