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13

I've seen gyms with bumper plates and a lifting platform, clearly designed and intended for standard Olympic weightlifting style drops from chest or overhead, next to a sign saying that one should always configure the safety bars so that the bar doesn't hit the ground. This would of course damage the bar, make a tremendous amount more noise, and increase ...


7

"since breathing necessarily disrupts your flow" I think the amount of disruption relates to how far from perfect your form is. Since they need to breathe, they put a lot of work in perfecting their body and stroke movement so there is almost no additional body movement related to breathing. If the catch and pull are done correctly, the body is swiveling ...


7

In a world with "Don't" signs everywhere, if it's a problem with your gym then there will be a sign up saying not to drop. All my local gyms have the sign, but they are upstairs of other businesses. They also have thick mats in the free weight area but do not have bumper plates. I wouldn't be concerned with death stares from other gym goers if there's no ...


6

This is more an answer to "what are the prerequisites for training using Olympic lifts", but I expect you will find it useful since you are coming from a conventional weight training background. The Olympic lifts are great, but they are highly technical, so you will really benefit from a strong foundation. 1) Ensure you have adequate flexibility to avoid ...


5

Ridigity is only one issue. Center of mass is the other, and unless such a contraption either has negligible mass, or has its center of mass in the plane of movement, it will induce additional torque at the point where the lifter grasps it. This torque may be large enough to cause significant discomfort if not outright injury. Even if your device could be ...


3

From the point of a physicist, no, it would definitely not be the same. I cannot think of any position for that this would be stable, without taking much effort. Above the head: Keeping the fancybar in a stable position above your head will need much of balancing out, since the bar will strive to a position with less potential energy, if you allow it. It ...


3

I suspect they breathe that much because that's just how much they need to... when going all out at that pace. From what you described of your own experience, you seem to be doing more long-distance/endurance swimming, which is pretty different from sprinting. Speaking for myself, when I do long distance, I definitely breathe less often than when I'm ...


2

The honest answer is that if you want to be good, you need to be coached, there's no way around it. That's awesome that your clean is good, as that motion can take a while to nail. But if you want to compete (even just locally) or start shooting for competitive weight levels, you'll need a coach in your area. It's frankly impossible to Olympic lift without ...


1

Deloading should, ideally, be planned and deliberate part of a training cycle. It typically happens every 4-8 weeks depending on fitness level and training intensity. The idea is to give the body an extended period of recovery and be completely fresh to start a new training cycle. You can typically tell when it's coming time because you'll start feeling ...


1

Based on our discussion via comments, I cannot emphasize enough the importance of Coach especially in your case. Why do I say that, you ask? Well firstly because, Olympic lifting is mix of strength, power & technique. What beginners often fail to understand is that technique is not a static thing. It is dynamic. With increase in weight on the bar, your ...


1

This could be due to shoulder stability - work your OH squats as much as you can, plus supplemental exercises like KB windmills and TGU will be of help as well.


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