7

There can be many reasons for muscle spasms/pulls in the neck area, including (in no particular order): Insufficient food: the muscles lack the glycogen stores required and overcompensate Insufficient sleep: your nervous system is impacted when you are in a sleep deprived state, and I've had most of the neck spasm issues when in this state Bad hydration: ...


6

This has happened to me a lot over the years. I found it was caused by tightness of the levator scapulae and middle and upper trapezius and a weak lower trapezius and serratus. All largely sorted through fixing muscular imbalances, using a mixture of self myofascial release and targeted resistance work on the weak areas. Release tension in pec major/minor, ...


4

Their answers hold weight... I've noticed the pull or tear when the weight was a little heavy or a lot heavy. Also every time you actually move your head forward or look down to do the weight, it's possible to strain or tear it. Keep good posture, eyes forward and head straight. Stabilize or don't use your neck while moving the weight.


4

Our strength levels on the overhead press are currently about the same. I've always struggled with it, but recently have started seeing some steady progress. There are some differences from cleaning the bar first and lifting out of the rack: The clean catch position is a bit wider than out of the rack. A clean catch is better suited to finishing with a ...


4

To answer your question best, you need to understand why you are doing overhead press. If you are doing Starting Strength or Strong Lifts, it's best to leave it in there and keep working on it--in those programs it's used for both core work and shoulder work. If your goal is simply to have stronger shoulders, then there's no reason to remain standing. If ...


4

It sounds like the problem with your (standing) overhead press is either form or maximal isometric strength in the core. Changing to an exercise that removes both of these factors and doesn't improve them does not seem like a productive way to increase your overhead press. Without a lot more details on your training history (sets, reps, loads, frequency), ...


4

It does both. The amount of chest involvement depends on the width of your hand placement. Experiment with that and make note of where you feel it in your chest most. Flat bench also works your shoulders, primarily the anterior delts The further inclined you are the more you hit the mid and rear delts as well All barbell bench variations will involve more ...


4

A very common movement impairment is using the lower back to compensate for a lack of overhead shoulder mobility. Here is a person with their hands above their head:                 BUT, the person is actually leaning back to get this overhead motion:      ...


4

Without seeing you press, I'm uncertain what's causing your imbalance. However, you may be able to improve your balance in the press by: Picking a point of focus. Before beginning each repetition — preferably for the entire duration of the set — pick a point straight ahead of you at eye level and stare intently at it. Wandering eyes change ...


3

Upper-body progression is hard, and often needs more time to acclimate to higher loads. A program that goes 4x4, 4x5, 4x6, add weight, 4x4, 4x5, 4x6, add weight (etc.) can be good for overhead press. When I'm using such a program and can't do my given reps, I'll try to overload in other ways. Accessories Sometimes I'll use accessory work of a similar kind,...


3

There are many ways to press a weight overhead. What you describe are a (1) a specific trick used in several overhead press styles, called a 'lay back' or a 'lumbar tilt' (it's unclear from your description which you're using) and (2) a strict military press: This is where it all began, in about 1920, with only the del­toids doing the work. You can­not ...


3

To me, it sounds like you also need to be working on your upper thoracic mobility. This should also help with the hyperlordosis as the two areas are connected. Between them both, you can really correct your posture. When you warm up, also make sure your shoulders are properly warmed up as well. A couple warmup routines include (just pick one to use): ...


3

If you're doing barbell rows and deadlifts I think you're okay. The barbell row will work the upper back and posterior deltoid, and the deadlift will do your traps (upper/mid/lowers). The only other I can think of is the clean, since the bar is very close to your body and your pulling up with a similar grip. In fact, here's an existing Q&A that gets ...


2

Not specifically. A wide grip pull up would be the 'balancing movement' of an overhead press. If you want to take care of your shoulders, I would look into doing some band pull aparts and some face pulls with a rope at the beginning of your workout. Especially if you are planning on doing some heavy pressing movements (bench, overhead, dips, etc) Hope that ...


2

Overhead press can be very demotivating if done right, because the right way is heavier. What happens when you lean back, is that the chest muscles assist more, and chest muscles are predominantly stronger than the shoulder muscles, by virtue of being larger and more frequently used in general. The lean-back however, can damage your spine in the long run. ...


2

Replacing the 5/3/1 piecewise I also did Wendler's 5/3/1 for a while, and ran into the same problem. Obviously there is no one-size-fits-all solution to questions like these, but I do recommend switching programs that aren't working out. The good thing about 5/3/1 is that it lends it self to piecewise substitutions. You take nothing away from the other days ...


2

I think maybe you're mis-interpreting the tutorials or the tutorials are wrong. The weight of the bar should fall on the base of the palm which places it right above the arm. This is true for both bench and overhead press. That is the goal you are trying to accomplish regardless of what cue you use to make it happen. On the left of the image, you see that ...


2

It may sound unnatural, but squeeze your glutes (butt cheeks) as hard as you can during the lift. It will prevent your back from bending. Stronglifts explains it very well. The section "Common Pains" explains how to avoid injury.


2

First, I'd probably go with a 3 day full body workout, as this workout looks to be more of the advanced bodybuilder workout style. or do a 4 day workout and do two lower body days and two upper body days. either way.. Assuming your sleep and diet are fine, maybe your body has adapted to doing the OHP and its time to switch it up? you should switch exercises ...


1

In any exercise performed while standing, the kinetic chain just means the bones, joints and muscles between and external resistance and the floor. If you are standing up, then your kinetic chain is activated. With any part of the chain not activated, you either would not be able to stand, or would not be able to lift the weight. So if you can lift the ...


1

If you're typically only doing 9-15 reps of OHP per week, then it is very likely that you're stalling due to insufficient volume. You're doing a bodybuilding-style split, which depend on being able to generate enough fatigue in each session that the muscles trained in that session will take the rest of the week to recover, and actually being sensitive enough ...


1

So just to level set on the difference in rep ranges, read up on this. The shoulder press is very different than the overhead press (aka barbell press and aka "the press"). The shoulder press, because you're sitting on your butt, locks out everything south of your upper back but does have an advantage in overall shoulder stability. One core area that it ...


1

i don't see a problem with engaging your back when doing these exercises. as you can see below its a full body workout that also works your core. its main target is upper back shoulders and triceps and engaging and becoming familiar with those muscles as you begin to use those parts in the exercise is great for building them. never continue doing an exercise ...


1

Yes, Starting Strength does have quite low pressing volume, and you can add more weekly pressing volume by increasing frequency if your bench press or overhead press is stalling, and you feel that lack of volume is the culprit. (You'd want to be sure that it wasn't actually other common factors, like insufficient food intake, sleep, or rest between sets. But ...


1

Welcome to the Fitness SE! Stalling, or plateauing, is a very common occurrence. It will happen time and time again, and it happens to all of us. Knowing how to deal with it will help you overcome them though, so I'll be focusing on that. The problem with altering your program I would caution against altering a tried-and-true program. The numbers and ...


1

Bench press works mostly chest, incline bench works both to the same extend (45 degree angle) and overhead press works mostly shoulders. You can see the worked muscles in the order of percentage involved here: Bench press Incline bench Overhead press


1

I"ve had this exact problem for 2.5 years and I think i finally found the answer.. It's because we push our neck against the bench or seat when we press. Try not doing this for a bit and see if it helps.


1

I would recommend having a special focus on how you are positioning and moving your elbows in both exercises. During overhead pressing your elbows should be in the front and never at the side, during the bench your elbows should be closer to your body (closer grip is healthier). Both are causing more strain on the shoulder and the stabilizing muscles of the ...


1

Looks like you've got a strain in your trap and rhomboid muscles as a result of a muscle imbalance. The first thing I would do is not arch my back when doing bench presses. Try keeping your legs up on the bench with your feet flat. Also, make sure you are lowering the bar to your sternum and not the upper chest. Otherwise, you may be offloading the ...


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