17

Will the above routine be considered over training? No, because it's impossible for a routine to be considered overtraining. Even a program as obviously impossible for mortals as "600 sets of 3 back squats at 95% 1RM, 7 days a week, with a marathon for cardio" isn't overtraining, because programs aren't overtraining, an individual trainee's ...


5

No. 1.5 miles isn't that long but is good to burn some extra calories. Just be sure to change up which muscles you are using (Not only Upper Body for example) in your strength session, then this is a good routine. Overtraining would be if you workout that much that your body can't recover from the damages you are doing to it during your workouts. I wouldn't ...


2

First, I'd probably go with a 3 day full body workout, as this workout looks to be more of the advanced bodybuilder workout style. or do a 4 day workout and do two lower body days and two upper body days. either way.. Assuming your sleep and diet are fine, maybe your body has adapted to doing the OHP and its time to switch it up? you should switch exercises ...


1

There seem to be a number of interpretations of the term Greasing the Groove floating around, but the term might be characterised by the fact that (1) lifting is sub-maximal, and (2) not performed to failure. So although performing a warm-up might optimise our strength for a lift, it is reasonable to suggest that for this method it is unnecessary, since we ...


1

One method is doing the movement with partial rom, for example, do a tiny rom pullup, then gradually increase the rom until you do 5 normal pullups


1

Perhaps the most obvious sign of over-training is a reduction in performance. Whether it be strength, speed, or endurance, we are unlikely to be able to maintain the level of our previous performances. Over-training further presents itself in the form of general fatigue, weakness, elevated heart and/or breathing rates, poor quality sleep, and poor motivation....


1

Our tolerance to training volume is certainly a function of training experience. The term training age is sometimes used to describe the total number of years over which an athlete has trained, particularly in the context of younger athletes. However, this term tends to oversimplify the problem, since our training can be contiguous or intermittent, and can ...


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