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18

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is not something you should use to gauge the efficiency of your workouts. It's mostly only experienced when your body gets put through something it's not used to. In essence, it's not anything you need to aim for. But in terms of getting variety into your workout regimen, it's a good indicator of "hey, this is new", ...


15

It depends. With ibuprofen in particular, the anti-inflammatory properties are beneficial. Initially inflammation is important for healing an injury, but too much inflammation is detrimental. Based on that I prefer to take ibuprofen if the inflammation persists, but not immediately after getting the injury. Pain killers can also indirectly contribute to ...


14

That sounds like a ligament or tendon issue, which could be serious. I would worry about your squat form: perhaps your knees are tracking forward, or your stance is too narrow, or you're coming off your heels, or perhaps something else is going on that no one can figure out through the Internet. Whichever one it is, it doesn't sound like a muscle problem. ...


14

The short answer is yes continue your normally scheduled workout session. The soreness will be greatly lessened over time as you get used to using your muscles regularly. It is better to have a light day and keep exercising than it is to skip altogether. Now, severe DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness), as it sounds like you are experiencing, is a symptom ...


12

The rotator cuff group is comprised of four muscles, commonly referred to as SITS. Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Minor and Subscapularis. Most of these serve to rotate the arm, although the Supraspinatus is responsible for abduction (movement away from the body) of the upper arm. Caveats - All of the exercises listed should be done with light weights ...


11

I would guess that by running exclusively on a tread mill you developed a stride that relied on the forgiving surface. I run exclusively in minimalist shoes (Vibram Fivefingers) on pavement with no complaints now but I ran in traditional running shoes for over a decade and had occasional knee or plantar fascia problems. I also spent about five years ...


10

I don't know the exact cause of cracking joints and as that page indicates professional opinion is also inconclusive, but I've always thought it was the cavitation of the synovial fluid which is again confirmed there. From Johns Hopkins' Orthopedic page: Cracking and popping of joints is usually normal and most of the time is nothing to be concerned ...


10

Muscle soreness is caused by damage to your muscles from your workout. This is a good thing, as it tells your muscles to adapt. As long as you are differentiating between soreness and injury, you can work out while sore. In fact, working out the same muscles will probably reduce the soreness you are feeling. Once you warm up, you might find the majority of ...


9

Maybe your monitor is too high or not at the right angle. It should conform to these standards: (From this question about standing desk ergonomics.)


9

Forward head posture (called gravity induced kyphosis) is pretty common nowadays. The first thing you should do is begin stretching your neck with an exercise called neck retraction: You'll be amazed at how great this exercise feels. If you've been stuck in forward head posture for a long time, you'll feel as though your entire upper spine is waking up. ...


7

Make sure you're getting enough potassium. Sodium and potassium are both critical to fuel your muscles. The typical diet is rarely deficient in sodium. But it is common to have low potassium levels. In fact, an increase in physical activity will increase your body's demand for potassium. That could explain the prolonged soreness you're experiencing.


7

This to me sounds like DOMS. Particulary if you haven't done this type of resistence training before and your form was good. Also the soreness caused by DOMS is a dull, aching pain in the affected muscle. As the article says: The pain is felt only when the muscle is stretched, contracted or put under pressure, not when it is at rest. I find that if I ...


7

The thing that concerns me is this: Here is my problem. 2 weeks ago I got squeezed by the 142.5kg (314lbs) barbell while doing squats. Nothing really bad happened because I have squat rack, but I felt a little needle pinch in my left upper belly (just under my ribs). I have a mental picture of your upper body folding forward creating an impingement. ...


7

The surface you are running on may play a role in how your body reacts. There’s an often quoted study co-authored by Southern California podiatrist John Pagliano that states… "… one of the five leading causes of injury is "improper" running surfaces........concrete is approximately 10 times harder than asphalt, so all your bones, muscles and ...


6

Very likely it might be a form of tendinitis caused by some form problems. Someone I know recently had similar symptoms, and posted about their journey here. The thing causing most of his issues was a slight slide forward at the bottom of the squat. He isn't the only one who experienced this problem, and it is common enough for Rippetoe to write about it. ...


6

Taking ibuprofen or other NSAIDs (anti-inflammatories that reduce pain and swelling) before for exercise can mask pain. Pain can be a warning sign to stop an exercise to prevent joint or soft tissue damage. Therefore, if you take it before exercise, you risk aggravating a problem.* However, if you have painful joints that prevent you from exercising, ...


6

Pain in the lower leg muscles and tendons is very common among beginners who start to run. The reason is that your muscles are not yet adapted to running, meaning there are specific muscles which are either too short or too weak in relation to the others. This imbalance causes excess tension on these muscles and can result in injury if you keep running ...


6

Peter, there are several possible causes. Because you are morbidly obese and may have medical conditions to consider, this is something to check out with your doctor. You know that often repeated phrase, "before beginning an exercise program, check with your doctor or healthcare practitioner." Walking one mile a day has significantly increased your ...


6

You started squatting more so you would get better at squatting. It sounds like your plan is working. You're better at squatting since you squat more. One part of being better at squatting is that squatting doesn't make you sore. Two concerns: one, it's not clear what you mean by "attempted squat 5 failed attempts", which sounds a bit reckless. Two, if your ...


6

What you are feeling is normal. Any time you do a new exercise, or even an old exercise in a new way, you will be pushing your muscles past the point where they are comfortable and making them sore. For the most part, this is lumped into the term Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). For some people, the presence of DOMS becomes a goal or a indication of a ...


6

Most of the migranes are hereditary. Biological states may cause increases in free fatty acids and blood lipids, increased platelet aggregation, decreased serotonin levels and increased prostaglandin levels, which can cause the vasodilatation that precedes migraine headache. One possible reason for this is that a part of the physical reaction may be the ...


5

I've had a very similar pain after doing an intense dumbbell circuit that heavily taxed my forearms. Towards the end of the workout I got a sharp pain while doing barbell front raises -the stress is very similar on your grip/forearm as a kettlebell swing. So most likely this is an overuse injury which causes the tendon to get inflamed. From personal ...


5

Are you forefoot striking? Forefoot striking places more load on your calves than a heel strike would, and could explain the soreness in your calves. And forefoot striking is a good thing as it tends to prevent more serious injuries. In addition to this, one might think that eventually your calf muscles would catch up. But this depends on the distance ...


5

While concrete may be a harder surface than asphalt, other than preconceived perceptions, there is not an appreciable difference in deflection (Force returned from a surface) between concrete and asphalt. There is a difference between grass, dirt, rubberized track surfaces, etc., but between asphalt and concrete any difference that you perceive is ...


5

TL;DR: Try using proper wrist position, check your form, lift for technique, don't overwork an injury. My wrists started hurting when I started weightlifting (about eleven months ago) during bench press and overhead press. I got myself some wrist wraps in the beginning and they helped keep my wrists in the proper position. About two months ago I stopped ...


4

Pain beneath the knee cap can have many causes. Most often, it's caused by your biomechanics being a bit off so your knee cap is tracking badly as your leg moves. It can also be referred pain from some other problem in the area. (Referred pain: the nerves are shared so pain in one spot can feel like it's coming from somewhere else). My advice is to see a ...


4

Shoulders are not to be f'd with. Find a lifting coach and have them take a look at your form. You could find them at a local Olympic or powerlifting gym, CrossFit box, or a well-recommended personal trainer. Make sure they know Starting Strength and how to overhead press before you let them tell you how to do it. Pay them for a private lesson if necessary....


4

With running, generally you get muscle pain from Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). The currently accepted theory is that this comes from stressing the muscle beyond what is is currently capable of. The DOMS is a symptom of the remodelling processing which yields a stronger muscle for that work. In your case it appears you've experienced DOMS in other ...


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