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18

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is not something you should use to gauge the efficiency of your workouts. It's mostly only experienced when your body gets put through something it's not used to. In essence, it's not anything you need to aim for. But in terms of getting variety into your workout regimen, it's a good indicator of "hey, this is new", ...


10

Forward head posture (called gravity induced kyphosis) is pretty common nowadays. The first thing you should do is begin stretching your neck with an exercise called neck retraction: You'll be amazed at how great this exercise feels. If you've been stuck in forward head posture for a long time, you'll feel as though your entire upper spine is waking up. ...


9

Maybe your monitor is too high or not at the right angle. It should conform to these standards: (From this question about standing desk ergonomics.)


7

This to me sounds like DOMS. Particulary if you haven't done this type of resistence training before and your form was good. Also the soreness caused by DOMS is a dull, aching pain in the affected muscle. As the article says: The pain is felt only when the muscle is stretched, contracted or put under pressure, not when it is at rest. I find that if I ...


7

The surface you are running on may play a role in how your body reacts. There’s an often quoted study co-authored by Southern California podiatrist John Pagliano that states… "… one of the five leading causes of injury is "improper" running surfaces........concrete is approximately 10 times harder than asphalt, so all your bones, muscles and ...


6

The thing that concerns me is this: Here is my problem. 2 weeks ago I got squeezed by the 142.5kg (314lbs) barbell while doing squats. Nothing really bad happened because I have squat rack, but I felt a little needle pinch in my left upper belly (just under my ribs). I have a mental picture of your upper body folding forward creating an impingement. ...


6

You started squatting more so you would get better at squatting. It sounds like your plan is working. You're better at squatting since you squat more. One part of being better at squatting is that squatting doesn't make you sore. Two concerns: one, it's not clear what you mean by "attempted squat 5 failed attempts", which sounds a bit reckless. Two, if your ...


6

What you are feeling is normal. Any time you do a new exercise, or even an old exercise in a new way, you will be pushing your muscles past the point where they are comfortable and making them sore. For the most part, this is lumped into the term Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). For some people, the presence of DOMS becomes a goal or a indication of a ...


6

Most of the migranes are hereditary. Biological states may cause increases in free fatty acids and blood lipids, increased platelet aggregation, decreased serotonin levels and increased prostaglandin levels, which can cause the vasodilatation that precedes migraine headache. One possible reason for this is that a part of the physical reaction may be the ...


5

While concrete may be a harder surface than asphalt, other than preconceived perceptions, there is not an appreciable difference in deflection (Force returned from a surface) between concrete and asphalt. There is a difference between grass, dirt, rubberized track surfaces, etc., but between asphalt and concrete any difference that you perceive is ...


5

TL;DR: Try using proper wrist position, check your form, lift for technique, don't overwork an injury. My wrists started hurting when I started weightlifting (about eleven months ago) during bench press and overhead press. I got myself some wrist wraps in the beginning and they helped keep my wrists in the proper position. About two months ago I stopped ...


4

It sounds like the problem with your (standing) overhead press is either form or maximal isometric strength in the core. Changing to an exercise that removes both of these factors and doesn't improve them does not seem like a productive way to increase your overhead press. Without a lot more details on your training history (sets, reps, loads, frequency), ...


4

When switching to power cleans and/or front squats for the first time you will start to notice that many areas of your body are not very flexible. This will adjust over time, however I would recommend that you do supplementary stretching. I am a big fan of Glenn Pendlay's videos when it comes to Olympic lifting, and this one is most appropriate for you.


4

To answer your question best, you need to understand why you are doing overhead press. If you are doing Starting Strength or Strong Lifts, it's best to leave it in there and keep working on it--in those programs it's used for both core work and shoulder work. If your goal is simply to have stronger shoulders, then there's no reason to remain standing. If ...


4

The medical term is (BFS) benign fasciculation syndrome. Loosely translated, that means "probably not serious muscle tremor". Here's a video of a man's calf muscle with BFS. Like most benign conditions, it's not extensively studied. Research (fortunately) tends to go where's the greatest need and unraveling the mysteries of a harmless eye twitch doesn't get ...


4

The most important thing about gaining muscle mass with a skinny physique ('ectomorph body type') is the diet. Your diet has to be both high caloric and high protein, use an online calorie calculator to roughly work out how much you should consume per day (the bodybuilding website usually has a few). When fixing your diet, try to obviously only consume ...


4

Your problem might not be with the hardness of the ground you're running on. If you run on a sidewalk that is on the same level on the road you shouldn't see much difference. I think the issue here is the fact that sidewalks are not as straight as paved road. Most sidewalks have bigger slopes going down, up, then back down again. And the sidewalks stop when ...


4

I primarily agree with Sparafusile. DOMS is pretty normal, especially for those impulse exercise sessions where you haven't warmed up, or haven't done the exercise before. Over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatories such as aspirin or ibuprofen combined with heating pads or hot baths will give you enough relief to be able to sleep. For steps, as ...


4

That 'outwards' sort of grip is commonly referred to as 'suicide grip' for obvious reasons. While it may not be dangerous on many exercises, on the Bench Press for example it can be very harmful (even deadly, hence the name) to use it. With this grip it is way easier/more likey that the bar just slips out of your hands crushing the whole weight onto your ...


3

I'll address this in two ways, as the final answer really does depend on your goals. Unless otherwise stated, when we are talking about squats, I'm assuming back squats. Health Reasons for Full Squats Specifically, one of the main reasons to squat to depth (defined as the crease of the hip parallel or lower than the top of the knee) has to do with joint ...


3

Part of the reason for squatting deep is to avoid muscle imbalance, but that's not my primary reason. Squatting to parallel or beyond uses the knee and hip joint through a fuller range of motion than half-squats or other partial movements. This is good for mobility and strength for a variety of tasks. Squatting deep also protects the knee joint by ...


3

General Strategies for Tendonitis The real general advice is something you probably already know. Listen to your body, and if something hurts, quit doing it. If it hurts when you're not active, take a few days off. And if it continues to hurt after a week or more of rest, go see a doctor and physical therapist. Advice for gym climbing It sounds like ...


3

I like to stand and work too and in my 12 months experience here is what I have learnt: Sitting all the time at work is obviously bad but standing at just one angle isn't super great. So, rather than just standing, give your body some variation. Break monotonous standing with sitting. Don't just stand, take a quick 5 minute walk. Good as it is, but ...


3

Because you have new onset of problems (ie neck and upper back tensions) since the introduction of your new desk, you can optimize your posture. Most muscle strain comes from overuse or imbalance, and most office related pain comes from misalignment or lack of core muscle strength. To figure out what's going on, first, try to get a sense for your posture. ...


3

Ref foam rollers.They don't work for me! Here is my story. I am 74 in a very good shape, I exercise regularly and I practice moderately a number of sports, including bicycling, kayaking and windsurfing in summer. Last winter, one year ago, I had sprained a back muscle while unsuccessfully resisting falling on the ice on my way home. A week after,the ...


3

You're probably not maintaining a neutral spine as you attempt to perform your crunches. Be mindful of what you're doing with your head and upper back/cervical spine as you execute the movement. Filming yourself while you perform this exercise (from the side would probably be most beneficial) and looking at your spinal flexion will help you determine whether ...


3

I'm going to caveat this answer by informing you I am not a physical therapist. The routine I'm linking to is from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons: Rotator Cuff Shoulder Conditioning Program. Some high points are: The rotator cuff needs to heal. If your client has pain dealing with any of the exercises outlined, don't do them. Strengthening ...


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