6

If you feel sharp pain in the lower back, then you need to adjust the exercise. The reason why lying leg raises are often painful, is that the lower back gets pinched and compressed as the weight of the legs tilts the hip and pulls the lower back upwards. The main leg lifting muscle is the psoas major, which connects your thigh bone directly to your spine. ...


5

This sounds like classic overtraining. I'd try taking a full week off from all strenuous workouts. Instead of a workout, just warm up and stretch or go for a walk. Take it easy for seven days and see how you feel in the workouts after the break. In athletes, overtraining is closely associated with undereating. This is hard news for someone working on long-...


4

While I don’t have a specific answer for marathon running, I can relate it to a somewhat similar requirement. I feel the methodology utilized would share some of the same characteristics. As a competitive rower, I am faced with racing long distances in a “Head” style race. The typical distance is 3.2 miles (~5000 meters). Granted, this is not a marathon ...


4

Myosatellite cells are basically inactive structures that are found in mature muscle cells. Depending on the stimulus, they can develop into different things in the muscle. As I understand it, they have a couple of functions. They can increase the number of nuclei, create new muscle fiber or spawn off daughter cells. The increase in muscle fiber content is ...


3

Well you aren't getting in shape by sleeping. Yes sleep is crucial to a good fitness routine but sleep is not making you more fit. Also 5-6 hours isn't terrible if it is just one night. If you have 4 workouts you do a week and you will move this workout to another day I say do that. If you will simply skip the workout, I wouldn't. Since you are more apt ...


2

I am a runner and have completed P90X and P90X2. I would strongly suggest P90X2 to meet your personal goals of improving your physical appearance and your running form. While P90X is designed for general fitness, P90X2 is more focused on athletic performance. There are a few key aspects of P90X that make it a better fit for you: Core strengthening - There ...


2

You are talking about a nap for a whole 1 hour. Actually, this is not a true nap. Nap is about 20 minutes long, depends on personal preferences but the rule is that you (better say your brain) should stay in REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleeping phase. From my personal point of view, the best solution for your situation is to have a 20 minutes nap and then 40 ...


2

Well I see nobody wants to answer this so I will give it a try: 1.No.It is not normal to feel back pain no matter what exercise you do.(And I experienced people saying they had the same pain you had during the same exercise but after placing their hands right they had no problems at all) 2.Your back is unsteady because I presume you are holding your hands ...


2

Its all about conditioning. You have not stated for how long have you been cycling and am assuming not very long. The person you mentioned might also have sub 50 resting heart rate while yours would be in 70-90 range. Once you keep performing the same exercise over a period of time, your body/heart becomes very efficient in doing so. Basically the same 40 ...


1

Nothing to be concerned with, that’s a normal compensation while doing planks. A couple things are going on here: When you raise your glutes, your shoulders begin to point downward as you're moving your center of mass forward. The more weight loaded on your forearms the less work your core has to do. This also results in scapular protraction. A motion ...


1

My first thought on reading this was climbing! Arguably the ideal body type for climbing is a small frame (light bodyweight), long limbs (ideally, positive ape index) and long reach. Look at someone like Adam Ondra, for example. The likelihood of injury is kind of down to you. If you take up climbing and immediately try to pull on crimps on an overhang for ...


1

General Answer If you want to economize I'd say that you'd be best at keeping not pace, but the same effort all along. If someone states that you should be running faster at the end, the question would be: to what aim? In my experience the key is to do proper training to get familiar with which is your own real long slow distance (LSD) pace. (This also ...


1

As noted, "good running form" is subjective. Being in the 21:40 range for a 5k is nothing to sneeze at, as you are looking at slightly over a 7:00/mile pace which is not bad. Can it be improved? Maybe, and that is where the subjective comes in. It is hard to say without seeing a typical week for you, but I would suspect that you are just kind of running ...


1

Good running form is definitely subjective. That much is inescapable. I would really pose it as how do you feel after your runs? No one here can really say if your 5k time is "good". In general that seems to me like a reasonably in shape time but it is dependent on your weight, goals, and body type. Your training seems pretty standard. How I would see if I ...


1

Like most things relating to strength training, it really depends on the person. I would say a good rule of thumb is to never skip a workout, regardless of physical/mental ailment. Often you will have to accommodate your physical/mental condition in your workout by decreasing the volume or intensity, but something relatively trivial as "I'm tired" isn't a ...


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