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7

You need to work on something that is easier and you can hold for longer time. 6 seconds is really not enough volume to really start improving. See, you are not even on the chart in the (excellent) article you are referencing, which starts at a max hold of 8s: With a 6s max hold time, you would have to work at ~70% of that, or 4-5 secs... it is just too ...


6

Perhaps you should consider easier variations of the plank exercise. Place your arms on something higher (say, a chair). This will shift more weight to your feet and help you hold the position for longer. This will allow you to push yourself to hold the plank longer. Slowly progress to lower surfaces, and when regular plank becomes too easy for you, elevate ...


5

From a physiological standpoint, going from the plank to the squat requires you to hold a significant amount of bodyweight over your shoulders, and is bringing your abdomen into a compressed position that can naturally drive your wind out of you. Compare that to the pushup, which has the weight distributed between your hands and feet, or the moving to plank, ...


4

Without knowing more, it’s hard to say, but it would seem as though you need to challenge yourself more. Either add weight to the plank, or modify the body weight version (or both). To modify, you could do a wall plank or mountain climbers as two examples.


3

Getting up is harder than the push-up because work, by the physics definition, is "the product of force and displacement". In other words, you are moving more weight over a greater distance when getting up than you are when doing the push-up. It would take any machine (human or otherwise) more energy to stand up than to do a push up. Burpees are exhausting, ...


3

For planks and bridges, I try to squeeze my butt really tight and get prepared for a sucker punch to the stomach. Your "core" is everything south of your pecs to north of your knees. I've always found "core" to be a silly term, but it does make people think of the oft forgotten muscles that we're talking about here. That position, where you are literally ...


3

The basic plank is (typically) a rather easy exercise. This is mostly due to it being an isolation hold as well as being a well supported body position. If you can hold a plank for longer than a minute, then you should progress towards more challenging plank variations. You have two options which build off of one another for plank variations. First you have ...


2

Rest days are incorporated to give your body time to heal from activities that break down a lot of tissues or otherwise generate waste products. A proper training plan will keep you on the edge of what you can just barely do and provide for enough rest that you will heal and progress. While your workout is light years better than nothing, it's a far cry ...


2

The main function of the rectus abdominus is to curl the torso forward. Contrary to popular belief and method, bending at the hips works hip/leg flexors, with minimal involvement to the abdominal muscle. For growth, you need to stress the muscle as you would any other, with progressive overload in the hypertrophy range for sets/reps. To start, you can do ...


2

The rotator cuff muscles are important in shoulder movements and in maintaining glenohumeral joint (shoulder joint) stability.[4] These muscles arise from the scapula and connect to the head of the humerus, forming a cuff at the shoulder joint. They hold the head of the humerus in the small and shallow glenoid fossa of the scapula. "Am I right in ...


1

I'd question the claim that side-planks are good for shoulder stability. There are some stability demands of the side-plank, but they're pretty minimal and unlikely to really put a significant training stimulus on the shoulder muscles. The only point of instability in a side plank is tilting forwards (into a prone position) or backwards (into a supine ...


1

Just something to think about: Burpees are a controversial movement. They are, as you mention, very hard, and they are also very hard on your body. Many people don't believe the payoffs of the exercise justify the cost. At 1:24 in this interview the spine expert Stuart McGill discusses burpees. He points out that the movement does not mimic anything in ...


1

It's beter to focus on increasing the time you can hold a plank, than to repeat it multiple times in one day. So in the beginning it will be 6 seconds, but push yourself everyday to hold them longer. Your muscles need time to recovery, otherwise they won't get stronger. Safe training!


1

Since building a sixpack will require some muscle growth, I'd argue that neither are effective. You'll be at a point where you can do dozens of sit-ups very quickly, which might be fine for the endurance of your abs, but won't help growth very much. Same for holding 3 mins of planck. Fine, but not very helpful on your way towards a sixpack. While not ...


1

There is no training system that works for everyone, but the one that I tend do and which works for me is to do three sets of planks a day. Using a timer, hold the plank for a minute (or about 10 seconds less than how long you can stay up) and then rest. To know about how much rest you need and to work your core evenly, do a side plank (as illustrated here) ...


1

Personally I would say not a "bad" idea, likely even a good idea especially if that's a skill you wish to get stronger at. When you say full body training is a bit vague, I have to assume that doesn't mean hitting targeted weighted core exercises then an hour of planks 3x a week. As mentioned above the core is used in pretty much every exercise but harder to ...


1

So planks may be good or bad for rest days but it depends on what type of core exercises you do on your workout days. Core is a particularly hard exercise to do more than flex as part of a workout. As a result it can be OK to do core multiple days in a row (but probably shouldn't be every day.) What I would recommend is doing yoga which will dynamically ...


1

Nothing to be concerned with, that’s a normal compensation while doing planks. A couple things are going on here: When you raise your glutes, your shoulders begin to point downward as you're moving your center of mass forward. The more weight loaded on your forearms the less work your core has to do. This also results in scapular protraction. A motion ...


1

I briefly scanned PubMed for relevant studies and it seems that most have been done in the sick, elderly or sedentary individuals and it is used more in a rehab setting. Some studies do show an, albeit small, effect on strength so it doesn't seem like you can just discard any claims made by vibration training advocates wholesale. However, it doesn't seem to ...


1

There's already an answer to this, sort of, but I'll specifically try to address your question which is a smidge different. Typically you want to exercise muscles for whatever their role in athleticism or daily life will be. Also, some muscles have evolved to perform certain roles in certain ways. If you need to push a car, it's natural that you'll engage ...


1

Your plan is OK for fitness and weight loss, however there are a few points you need to consider. BMI is somewhat flawed, since it is unable to take body composition into account - if you build upper body muscle, your BMI may not drop even though you are in much better shape. A better indication of your weight loss progress is a combination of body weight ...


1

The goal of the plank is to strengthen your core. As a result, the longer you can stay in the position, the stronger your core becomes. To answer your question, you can perform as many sessions daily as time permit you; however, that shouldn't be your goal. Your goal should be to progressively increase the duration. If 6 seconds is all you can currently do, ...


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