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6

Octagonal plates interfere with proper strength training Octagonal plates have no reason to exist, and are actively counterproductive to working out properly. Octagonal or otherwise non-round plates make many fundamental barbell exercises from the floor--including cleans, snatches, and most importantly deadlifts--awkward. Upon putting plates down, the bar ...


5

Laziness? There's not much risk of injury or loss of balance if smaller plates move around, having to take the collar on and off when doing drop/up sets is a pain when you are on a schedule.


2

In addition to laziness, I’ve seen this done in meets to save time (and the loaders’ grips) when the bar is being gradually loaded with many incremental increases.


2

From personal experience from a couple of gyms (and admittedly this may not always be the case), if the plates are smaller rubber ones, then they actually fit very tightly onto the bar so despite the dynamic nature of the Olympic lifts, there's virtually zero horizontal movement of the plates during the lift. I've seen smaller metal plates (1.25kg, 2.5kg) ...


2

If you've undergone strength building programs such as Strong Lift's 5X5, then, the only way you'll derive much benefits from a 45-lb plate is through high intensity and high repetitions/sets. While compound exercises are highly recommended, a lot of high repetitions/sets exercises are isolation movements (which allows some parts of the body to rest while ...


2

It's easy to make the argument that a plate has only one requirement: to weigh a certain amount. However, round plates enable a range of exercises that are impractical with any weight that has straight edges. Any floor exercise: i.e. rows, deadlifts, cleans Any exercise that requires rolling: i.e. barbell ab rollouts The difference is significant enough ...


2

TLDR Mostly history, but also, depending on what you do, you may need space for bearings/bushings. History Once upon a time, weightlifting was new and the quality of steel you could get wasn't that great, especially when you needed hundreds of pounds of it. The Victorian weightlifters didn't buy those cartoon, fixed weight, globe-end bars because they hated ...


1

Bumper plates are for olympic lifting. In general, any weight coated in rubber is 1) to dissipate the reaction when the plate hits the ground 2) aesthetics. Aesthetics are much more prevalent with dumbbells. Gyms like to coat the DBs in rubber, as well as their logo. The tradeoff though, that I don't think many gym owners fully appreciate, is that rubber ...


1

It could just be a short barbell. They're usually used for exercises like straight bar curls which require a barbell but not necessarily long ones since you don't have to use a rack like you would for squatting or pressing/bench pressing, and can be done without a wide grip.


1

Given the equipment, you can do a lot of brutal Complexes. They won't get your strength up like real strength workouts will, but you can build some muscle and drop a lot of fat. Tuminello's weight plate complex is a good one to throw in your rotation. Perform the complex five times with only 90 seconds rest between each round. 6-8 Overhead Squat 6-8 ...


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