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13

Whenever we start something, we may find it boring. So, I would suggest you for a change of mind, i.e., try different sports. Running is good for you at this stage. You said you are unable to run continuously for more than 5 minutes. If I were you, I would rather follow the run/walk strategy. Run for 2 or 3 mins and walk for 1 min and continue this for some ...


9

At a first glimpse the standing desks seem like another "improvement" companies throw to an item to make customers upgrade and re-buy the same thing. Essentially it's just a desk, right? That's what I thought until I started my current job which provided me with a standing desk. My job is sedentary and very static. I experimented and on some days remained ...


9

A recent meta-analysis of 23 published studies is MacEwen, MacDonald, and Burr, "A systematic review of standing and treadmill desks in the workplace," Preventative Medicine 70(January 2015):50-58. The article is here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.11.011 Quoting from the paper's summary: Treadmill desks led to the greatest improvement in ...


8

I get very tired and restless if I try to stand all day. If I got rid of my chair completely, I would be unhappy. In contrast, I feel awesome if my day is spent switching every hour between a standing desk, sitting desk, and reclining (on a couch with my feet up, preferably). Add frequent two-minute walks for added benefit. The problem is that we are ...


7

As far as I know, people who spend 8 hours stainding still (like shop personnel, assembly-line workers or standing security), have got problems too, mostly with their feet and legs: edemas, etc... I haven't conducted any serious research on it, but this makes sense. And in the beginning standing long will definitely be inconvenient or even painful. So in ...


7

I'm not sure this is from OSHA, but this is a diagram that I found on the subject:


7

Should you get rid of your office chair? - Not necessarily, especially if it is a good ergonomic chair that is adjusted to your work surface. A good chair gives your back support. Should you get up and move at regular intervals? - Yes, this is the key to keeping the negatives of prolonged sitting to a minimum. Should you add an exercise ball to alternate ...


7

According to Dr. Jos Verbeek of The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, "What we actually found is that most of it is, very much, just fashionable and not proven good for your health."


7

She doesn't know what she's talking about. The hips do not interface with any socket, rather they each contain a socket, so it makes no sense to try to describe the hips as moving relative to their own sockets. Furthermore, the femurs do not move out of the hip sockets except in the case of hip dislocation, which is a serious injury usually only occurring ...


6

I'm sorry you are having poor sleep! There are a few things you can try that have worked for me (I also have chronic neck issues). Rolling a towel and placing it under your neck while lying on your back, and rolling a few towels to place underneath your knees. If you feel uncomfortable on your back because your lower spine feels a pull, the rolled up ...


6

[Warning: Not really an answer to the question, but never the less an alternative...] I, for one, have given my office chair away! Or rather... I have replaced it with an exercise ball. I sit on the ball about half of the day and stand the rest of the day. The advantage of the ball as a chair compared with an ordinary office chair, is basically that you ...


6

Don't Sit All Day Sitting hunched over a desk or laptop all day is not good for you. At a minimum, take regular breaks throughout the day: walk around the building, get some water, stretch your arms, roll out your neck and ankles, do a few lunges, sit in a third world squat for thirty seconds: Configure a standing desk, but don't stand all day either: ...


6

I find that posture comes from strength in the right areas. A strong back tends to pull your shoulders back, which pushes your chest up. Your abdominal muscles create a solid wall up front, which keeps you upright. A strong lower back also helps to rock your chest up and keep you upright. A lot of poor posture is caused by anterior pelvic tilt, typically ...


5

I was looking for a general guideline as I am to purchase an exercise-ball online. According to this article: Knees should be level or slightly lower than the pelvis - creating an angle of 90 degrees or slightly greater at the hips and knees (thighs parallel to ground or pointing down slightly). They also give a general guideline on choosing the ball for ...


5

Anecdotal, I've been using a standing desk for about a year. I write software so it used to be ~8hrs sitting. Now I'm always standing. Dont notice a difference tbh. Some days my legs and lower back are sore if I happened to walk to work that day. If anything, now when I sit for a long time my lower back feels some soreness on getting up.


5

Being immobile in one position (whether sitting or standing) for long periods of time is just not good for you. Sit too long and you get all those posture problems and what not. Stand too long and blood pools to your calves. The natural state of man is to go between periods of rest and motion. Either you are laying around loafing or MOVING (walking, ...


5

"For example I always feel my quads after squatting and hardly ever feel my hamstrings." This is because squatting is a quad dominant exercise, this is normal. Yes squats use your whole leg but you wouldn't 'feel it' in your hamstrings as much (if at all) than your quads. "I can go to parallel but an attempt to go below results in form degradation " Why ...


5

An illustration of your problem: your weight training may improve or worsen the problem. It depends on which exercises you do and how you do them. First thing is you want to "stop" training your chest. That is "stop" doing bench press. When doing bench press use a narrow grip that shifts the load onto the triceps muscles instead. Prefer (...


4

Don't get rid of the chair, but add a 16-ounce cup/mug to your desk. Learn to like and drink water. (Assuming you have an office kitchen or water fountain within walking distance ) When you run out, you'll get up to refill it. You'll also be up often to the bathroom. Water is also good for you. No apps or reminders needed to get you up, just an empty ...


4

Horizontal rows are generally better for correcting posture in deskbound workers. You should be looking to strengthen your rear-shoulder muscle-groups: Trapezius, scapular deltoid, rhomboids, scapular retractors. Any sort of horizontal row where you keep your elbows high will do the trick. In addition, try any of the following: Face-pulls Reverse-fly ...


4

You're right to be skeptical about this, because a lateral pelvic tilt can be caused by either something very severe, or something mild. I had this issue recently (I'm grown up with symetric pelvis) because (im not sure) I've done lot lot of house work (cleaning) This suggests that the cause for this lateral pelvic tilt (LPT for now) is not very severe. ...


4

I'd highly recommend seeing a local Physical Therapist. A full evaluation is required to properly diagnosis and plan a corrective exercise regimen based on your unique situation. I've included information below that provides an overview of typical patterns seen that are similar to what you're describing. Postural and Neuromuscular Dysfunctions When ...


4

A very common movement impairment is using the lower back to compensate for a lack of overhead shoulder mobility. Here is a person with their hands above their head:                 BUT, the person is actually leaning back to get this overhead motion:      ...


4

Interestingly, the risks of mortality between the two conditions, sitting and standing, appear to be causally different. Our understanding of the former is supported by a large body of research demonstrating a general association between sedentary time and mortality. However, occupational sitting is not strongly associated directly with diseases like ...


3

I've had jobs that require standing all day, so I have had long bouts of standing, with only some short breaks, and for the most part it's fine. The only thing is you have to be careful about the surface you're standing on. A perfectly flat surface, like a hardwood or linoleum floor, will be a killer. You'd definitely want to get an anti-fatigue mat to stand ...


3

For side sleeping use body pillow. I have to sleep on my side because of sleep apnea. I'm using two body pillows and Side Sleeper Pillow under my check. First, it's much more comfortably to hug body pillow with your arms and legs. Your arms and shoulders will be completely relaxed. Second, check size of the pillow under the check. It should be exactly ...


3

To me, it sounds like you also need to be working on your upper thoracic mobility. This should also help with the hyperlordosis as the two areas are connected. Between them both, you can really correct your posture. When you warm up, also make sure your shoulders are properly warmed up as well. A couple warmup routines include (just pick one to use): ...


3

Yep, it's pretty do-able. I just did one right now to be sure. There's actually a bunch of muscles involved since you're locking your legs straight to help on the lever aspect. The exercise is referred to as a straight leg situp. Off the top of my head, I think some general full body conditioning stuff would be good, particularly the flutter kick, turkish ...


3

I have not tried out 5x5 training myself but it consists of two full body-workouts: Workout A: Squat, Bench Press, Barbell Row Workout B: Squat, Overhead Press, Deadlift, You train three times a week, alternating workout A and B, and resting at least one day between two workouts. You never train two days in a row because your body needs days ...


3

Workout program First off, I hope you're doing more than just the 5 exercises in the article you linked to. Those exercises are indeed a good set of exercises for the upper back, but good posture is only achieved through exercising the entire body! Intensity and volume parameters When deciding your set/rep ranges, one often asks "do I want to focus on ...


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