8

This is not really going to be a definitive answer, as you can find studies that support almost any position, so what I'm looking at for this is the trend of the studies that I've reviewed. Overall, I am finding that there are more studies that show soy protein does not have a detrimental effect on free testosterone, especially when connected to a ...


5

First: Good work on your bench so far. The form is quite good and you've clearly worked hard. I'm also very happy to see you trying to do anything you can do to get better (for example making the effort to film yourself and ask here for advice). For the most part, your bench form is perfect, so I am only pointing out minor things below. I did not have a ...


5

Stick with the powerlifting style benchpress. Do supplementary higher rep/lower weight dumbbell benchpresses afterwards. As you figured, benching with arched back has its benefits: it helps you putting more plates on the bar It lowers the risk of shoulder impingement There is one major drawback: You are not utilizing the full range of motion, which is ...


4

Higher heel elevation means that you can push your knees further forward before reaching the limit of your ankle flexibility. Knees further forward make for a more upright squat. If you're practicing Olympic weightlifting, then you'll generally want your squats to be more upright, since you need to catch the clean with an upright torso. Olympic lifters also ...


4

Contrary to JohnP, I'm pro arch, especially since you added the powerlifting tag. Having that thoracic extension really drives home the "shoulders down and back" pointer that keeps us steady. And as John points out, the movement does become more similar to a decline bench. But there's nothing wrong with that. In powerlifting competitions, it's coveted, ...


4

I'm sorry, but realistically, you can't. That being said, if you look at the range of different "fitness" qualities (endurance, power, strength, flexibility, etc), strength is generally the last one to go, and it's also one of the easiest to get back once you've initially built it. There are some things you can try, there is going to be some carry over ...


3

Upper-body progression is hard, and often needs more time to acclimate to higher loads. A program that goes 4x4, 4x5, 4x6, add weight, 4x4, 4x5, 4x6, add weight (etc.) can be good for overhead press. When I'm using such a program and can't do my given reps, I'll try to overload in other ways. Accessories Sometimes I'll use accessory work of a similar kind,...


3

If you're already a little strong, then there simply might not be a way to keep progressing on lower body strength. Squats and deadlifts are incredible exactly because the external resistance does something that is tough to replicate. But there's still stuff to try, both to maintain as much strength as possible and to develop other athletic qualities. Greg ...


3

First impressions from watching the video, it looks like there's a disconnect between your lower body and your upper. On the last rep (maybe before, but that was where I noticed it), there's movement around the hips, which points to your leg drive not being transferred up the chain. Also, I believe lifting the hips off the bench is a red light situation in ...


3

I attempted @Dark Hippo's method of using a "piece of string" at the correct height. I used a band along with the safety pins of a power rack to set up something I could bump to know I hit depth. What happened though is that it was inconsistent. If I took a wider stance, narrow stance, knees too far forward, and more, that band-line wasn't quite ...


2

Same boat as you. Was into strength training for almost 10 years and recently picked up BJJ with the intent of competing. First I'm going to tell you, that something has to give. You can't go balls to the wall on your lifts, then work all day, then go balls to the wall in BJJ training. It'll burn you out quick. At least it did for me within the first month....


2

So that you can read the plate weight from the inside and the outside. Usually they're all color-coded as well so you don't technically need to do that, but they do it anyway for consistency. (AFAIK the colors are not standardized so a "red" plate could be 20kg, 25kg or whatever). Also you can still read the weight of the larger plates if there are smaller ...


2

I don't have confirmation of this being the reason, but my educated guess would be for the visuals. The weight is usually printed on the face of the plates, but sometimes on both sides. This rule would ensure that there is always a weight being displayed on both the inside and the outside of the barbell in the majority of cases. With the exception of a ...


2

The biggest factor to keep in mind is that a belt is for your abs to brace against, not to support your lower back. Your spine is kept stable by the additional intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) you can generate by bracing against the belt. My personal approach is to pull it just about as tight as it can comfortably go and then back it off another notch. This ...


2

As mentioned by @DeeV, 4 reps at an 8 RPE is essentially your 6 RM. Using this idea, we can take a look at the table "Estimated Reps at Percent of 1 Repetition Maximum" to get a good starting point. This table states that an estimate for the true 6 RM is between 82 - 85% of the 1 RM. Another resource from Reactive Training Systems is the following chart: ...


2

I would say that it's basically saying "4 reps at your 6 rep max weight". You should have enough experience to know what that is if you're moving on to an RPE training program. Because you're probably not your strongest every training day, you probably want to aim for a weight that you can do 2-4 reps. So start with your 6 rep max and drop it a little for ...


2

Although the Wilks score is biased in certain areas, your logic here is incorrect. The Wilks score is used to balance out lighter lifters and heavier lifters. If you input the same total weight, the lighter body-weight will have the higher Wilks score. For example: 66 kg Male lifting 600 kg = 471.12 Wilks 83 kg Male lifting 600 kg = 400.50 Wilks 105 kg ...


2

If you are having trouble getting into a comfortable position, there are two things that it can be. Morphological (i.e. your body structure prohibits getting there), which there isn't much you can do or flexibility. Since you've indicated you have a limited range of motion (ROM), I am working on the theory that your muscular development is limiting the ...


1

When it comes to powerlifting, nothing really beats out doing squats. You can do a lot of leg work but the technique you gain from doing squats is missed. That said, leg extensions and leg curls will work your quads and hamstrings. Personally, I find the leg extension to be uncomfortable. One of my favourite quad building exercises is Bulgarian split squat ...


1

I would strongly advice against. Consulting Practical Programming for Strength Training, one learns that the optimal recovery time for a single muscle group is somewhere between 24 and 72 hours. Go below that and you can't fully utilize your full potential plus you risk overtraining and injury. Go longer and the training effect starts vanishing. Doing every ...


1

Can Push-Pull-Legs be done as a 3 day/week routine? Of course it can -- any program can be customized to be however you want. What you need to figure out is once you've implemented the program, is it still working for you and your goals. Summary of the linked article: there are multiple ways you can skin a push-pull-legs routine. You can run it as a 3 day, ...


1

I always tighten my belt that I can stick 1 or 2 fingers between belt and body. As commented opinions are divided about it, but all agree it works. As by the link in the comment, first few months dont use a belt, as your body wont train some muscles as it should (with deadlifting your back wont know how to keep itself steady if you ever lift without a belt)....


1

It really depends on your goals for each area. If you are planning on being serious about bjj and competing in it then the bulk of your time will be spent on "practice" for bjj. That means training the skills which make you proficient in bjj. When it comes to strength training which will help your practice but keeping you strong and giving you the strength ...


1

As mentioned in the comments, you answered this yourself: "[...] a routine to hit muscle twice a week focusing on increasing the strength on core lifts while doing accessories for hypertrophy." You can also use the power of Google to find some ideas for powerbuilding routines. The program I'm currently following might be interesting to you. It is a 4 day ...


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