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TL;DR: There don't seem to be many negative side effects besides water retention and the need to take in more water, although the benefit is limited for people who aren't already up against their limits and it doesn't seem to help for endurance training. Per WebMD: Creatine is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately for up to 5 years. When taken by ...


5

Stagnation is normal. You obviously can't have linear progression forever. What matters is how you deal with it. Variety Usually, we deal with it by employing variety. If you've done the same program for 8 months, it's time to switch to something new. The body derives strength from progressive overloading, and that is hard to achieve if you just to the ...


4

Since you are only able to train on weekends, you want to make the most of your time. Train on Friday and Sunday, full body. There are a lot of full body routines out there to choose from. But be sure to focus on the compound exercises that deliver the most bang for your buck. (Squats deadlifts, presses, rows, etc.) designing a specific schedule of exercises ...


4

It really depends on which supplement you are taking. If it is a nitric oxide supplement with green tea extract in it for instance, at least from personal and anecdotal evidence you tend to get less exhausted during your workout and as a result you can do more volume and/or greater intensity. That comes from the way the body breaks down Nitric Oxide. The ...


3

Using pre-workout for 3 years is way too long. The "tingling" comes from the Beta-Alanine, if you try standalone 1-1,5gr of Beta-Alanine you will definitely get the "tingling", that doesn't mean i recommend you to do. Pre-Workouts basically include creatine,beta-alanine,bcaa,caffeine from various stimulants and extracs, might include citruline if it's a "...


3

The only things that are particularly useful in a preworkout shake are sugar, caffeine, beta alanine, and creatine. A preworkout shake is supposed to give you additional energy to work out with. Having ate about an hour or two before hand also helps as you've got fresh energy to work with as well as no hunger (not to suggest that it's necessary). Sugar (or ...


3

I rate my training days on a scale of 1-4. This helps me address what I need to do. First the scale: I'm trash. No energy, very diminished capability. The bad side of average. Shouldn't have too many of these. The good side of average. Most training days should be here. I'm superman. Nothing can stop me, better than normal capability. The 1 days and ...


3

Generally what's known scientifically is that before or after a workout, your body can't differentiate between such states where it somehow arbitrarily "needs" something and can utilize it better just because it's in this mythical state. e.g.1 your body thinks it can somehow better utilize the protein it gets right after a workout e.g.2 this guy just ...


2

If you are already angry then use that. Aggression can be a brilliant tool in the weight room to induce adrenaline. You would be amazed at what you can do in the gym when you are pissed off. Don't stay angry forever though, use it as a stress release to calm yourself and set you up for the day. It really can work wonders.


2

Pre-workout is mainly just a mix of caffeine, creatine, beta-alanine, and maybe some other amino acids as well as some weird and questionable ingredients like 1,3-Dimethylamylamine (DMAA) that have influence on the cardio vascular system. There are quite some studies saying that they work, while there are other that say they don´t work. So i think this is ...


2

From personal experience I am able to tell that preworkout will help you in training. If you use it very often the effects of it will disappear. I only use it when im not having a good workout, this way when I use it it'll have a good effect. You should just try it, it is not that expensive. Another good solution is a cup of coffee before training. From my ...


2

You should be able to do Starting strength twice a week. Or a similar linear progression Full body workout twice a week. Won't need more than 45 minutes. I wouldn't recommend doing 3 days in a row or working out twice in a day. 3 days a week would be ideal, but it would be detrimental to your progress if you do 3 consecutive days, in my opinion. source: ...


2

Before the workout it is not very recommended for it to be something heavy. It should be a light snack 30-60 minutes before the workout. I got here two videos with good examples of things you can eat: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vVY0wZdrHU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h0i1ZEOeyc So mostly complex-carbs to give the needed energy to the body, try to ...


2

Somebody competing, in running or swimming say, needs to be full of energy but not be full of food (or else they add to their body weight, making them slower). What would they do? Snack on food 24 hours before rather than have big meals? Maybe read up on this answer related to carb loading. The short answer is that the human body can store around 2,...


2

Firstly, don't compare yourself to others. This is especially important when concerning fitness and nutrition. Your body may be similar but it is not the same as other people. Also be careful about drawing your own assumptions on causality: Your friend's intake of BCAAs is unlikely to be the reason he is lifting more than you. On BCAA's The meta-analysis ...


2

If possible, you should look to get your “energy” from quality food, rather than supplements. The supplement industry is a billion dollar industry laden with promises for quick gains. While some supplements may benefit the user, it’s best to not rely solely on a “magic pill” to enhance performance. Rather, make sure you are getting sufficient rest and ...


2

http://www.muscleforlife.com/pre-workout-nutrition/ has some good information on this. When I am not trying to lose weight, I've been eating 1 cup almond milk, 1 frozen banana, 1 scoop whey blended together.


2

Both of those items are supplements, meaning they supplement (add to) your diet to fill in the gaps. Pre-Workout is for providing you with energy required to workout harder (and potentially: have a bigger pump, recover faster, synthesise muscle mass better) Mass Gainer is just that, it is a powder containing lots of calories, usually in a lean, high protein,...


2

Is the arithmetic what you're having a hard time with? You just need to determine what dosage you want to use and weigh out a large batch of it all. For example let's look at a practical serving size for each ingredient, 02.00 grams, Beta Alanine 06.00 grams, Citrulline Mallate 15.00 grams, BCAAs Now if you wanted a 30 day supply, you just need a large ...


2

I found a couple of articles written by a Dr. Stuart McGill that walk about the "hydrophilic" nature of the spine. The first seems to agree with what your physiotherapist said but it a slightly different language. Not that they will burst like balloons but that the are full like a water balloon. The disks in between each of our vertebrae are packed with ...


1

According to this forum here, the general opinion seems to be that as long as my pre-workout is under 50 kcals then my insulin levels should NOT spike and there fore would not break my fast. I would think that waiting until 2:00pm to eat will still have benefit since up until 2pm, my body will still be in a fasted state. Could anyone help me confirm this?...


1

Please be cautious when experimenting with Testosterone. The body usually balances your increased T-levels with Estrogen, because too much testosterone can cause testicular cancer. There are estrogen blockers such as DIM that can be taken as part of your stack. Again, use caution and do your research on Examine.com. Look at the general ads on TV for law ...


1

Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) supplementation helps to have significant increases in muscle mass and strength and it is suggested to be taken twice a day, one right after you wake up and again one right before you go to bed (300 mg of starch or 300 mg of a high-concentration ashwagandha root extract). "Ashwagandha is a member of the family of herbs ...


1

As Pulaski stated he feels better training without carbs before his workout. As a number of studies have proven that when you eat carbs, protein and fats does not significantly effect your gains. So you could just try to do what fits you best. Also as stated above Pulaski abuses steroid and thus is not comparable. P.S. Most youtubers, suplement companies ...


1

Higher energy foods come from the more calorie-dense foods like sugary granola bars/power bars. For me, I like to have some chocolate to get my sugars up high and provide quick energy for a more intense workout. Namely, when I come home from work I like to have a quick snack, maybe a few pieces of chocolate, maybe a sugary drink (no more than 250 ml) to get ...


1

The mechanism for specific preworkout supplements will vary based on the supplement in question. It helps to frame the question around certain preworkout supplements specifically. I can go down a common list: BCAAs can help with protein synthesis and uptake for people with low protein in their diet (below 1g/kg body weight). In novices it can help lower ...


1

There's a very good series of articles called "The Protein Bible" over at schwartzeneggar.com Part 1: General info and protein sources Part 2: Protein Powders Part 3: Protein, and suiting it to your goals Part 4: Protein and Amino Acid Timing The article is written by the founders of Examine.com, which independently reviews research about a number of ...


1

Some things to think about, assuming you "gainer" product is one of the many whey protein (+ creatine?) powder: The manufacturer will always tell you to take too much of it (and sell more of it that way) Supplement taking does not gain muscle, hard work in the gym does Extra protein intake can help maximize result of the hard work, and help with recovery, ...


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