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A workout should ideally follow a relatively strict ordering. (Warm-up) High-skill/coordination exercises or movements which you are still learning, e.g. agility drills, Olympic lifts, gymnastics Speed drills or explosive efforts, e.g. sprints, throws, Olympic lifts, power variants of the Olympic lifts Strength exercises, e.g. squats, deadlifts, presses, ...


9

Joe Micela's Minimums and Maximums One of the foremost problems in my own strength training is that my strength work often gets pushed around by other athletic and social endeavors. I frequently find myself in a workout without the capability to hit the numbers as scheduled. At the moment I've simply reduced total lifting volume, and that’s fine. Another ...


9

You put the most important thing first. If you are working on your press strength, put it first. The advice to put squats first are for people who are brand new to lifting. Squats are the one exercise that take a lot of effort to get right, but have the biggest rewards as far as strength and muscle development go. If you've been lifting for more than two ...


6

You can try Smolov method for squating How Smolov Works The Russian Smolov Squat routine is split into 3 phases for a total of 13 weeks. As always, start with a weight you're 100% sure you can Squat instead of starting too heavy and hitting plateaus. The 4 Smolov cycles. Weeks 1-2 - introduction cycle to prepare your legs. Week 1 you Squat 3 day in a row ...


5

"For example I always feel my quads after squatting and hardly ever feel my hamstrings." This is because squatting is a quad dominant exercise, this is normal. Yes squats use your whole leg but you wouldn't 'feel it' in your hamstrings as much (if at all) than your quads. "I can go to parallel but an attempt to go below results in form degradation " Why ...


4

You have made solid progress. Congratulations, keep up the hard work. If I were you I'd switch to a program that adds weight weekly or monthly, such as Rippetoe & Kilgore's Texas Method from Practical Programming, or 5/3/1, or another similar program. That will keep you adding strength for quite a while longer. I'd consider switching up exercises, to ...


4

I don't see the point in switching up your program instead of fixing your nutrition and sleep. Moreover, I don't see the point in doing this specific hybrid. If you want rows, try Phrak's GSLP: As is, you're making a lot of changes to parts of the program that have nothing to do with your stated desires for customization. Many seem both arbitrary or ...


4

I used to compete regularly, and based on my experience I train differently when I am close to a meet than when I am just building strength. I was also working with a coach when I was trying to get my nutrition dialed in along with getting stronger. Whether I used common training plans like Wendler's 5-3-1, or my coach's outline, my training cycle was a ...


4

You're not really greasing the groove right now, and greasing the groove may not be the path to your goal. Six sets of 3-4 pull-ups between squat sets is not greasing the groove--three days a week, you're not greasing the groove! 35 to 40 reps per day is not high volume Maxing out once a week is just not very much practice You're splitting your attention ...


4

The key to continued progress ...is variation. Like TestWell said in a comment, "after a year of any program, it's time to switch it up", and that's honestly the best answer. But allow me to elaborate. Options There are enough options out there to fill entire volumes of books. It's not really a case of choosing the right one. It's more a case of finding ...


3

Studies are hard You're seeing contradictions because you're comparing apples and oranges. Actually, these studies have so many dimensions that you're comparing the whole fruit section of the supermarket. Ask yourself: what precisely do you want to know? "Which is better" is not precise enough. Do you mean muscle size? Strength? Athletic ability – ...


3

The first thing to consider is that you will see improved results in whichever exercise you choose to open with. You are the least fatigued at the beginning of your workout, so it is intuitive that you will see the best results in whatever you choose to do first. Anecdotally, I recently put the press at the beginning of my workout (StrongLifts) and it helped ...


3

I’d added some mobility and dynamic stretching to counter stiffness...I usually do Molding Mobility for joints - in the morning when I remember but most of the time only at the gym; then DeFranco’s Limber 11 if I’m starting a back squat or deadlift, his upper body stuff if I’m starting a press, something more targeted before front squats because they’re ...


2

If deadlifts are too much to do every workout and power cleans are off the table then more chin-ups is fine. Something like the following would be fine: A: Squat, Bench, Chin and Back extensions B: Squat, Press, Deadlift / alternated with Chins and Back extensions That keeps you deadlifting once a week, squatting three times a week, and chinning and doing ...


2

If your goal is purely defined by 'relative strength' objectives, then gaining additional mass may not be that desirable. Sure. Relative Strength = Amount of weight you can lift, relative to your bodyweight. Absolute Strength = The maximum amount of weight you can lift, irrespective of bodyweight. Generally speaking, smaller lifters do have higher ...


2

Congrats on joining the big plate club! When it comes to progressing at several different exercises, there's really no magic to it. You just make sure you do both of them. I don't know what kind of program you're using, but for someone with a small frame such as yourself, I'd probably do a full-body program, or at most a 2-split (leg day, upper body day). ...


2

Running calorie burn doesn't change so much with age and gender. Because its about the work you did physically. There is a non-linear relationship between walking speed and rate of calorie burn. Essentially what this means is that total calorie burn while walking depends on both the distance that you walked and the speed at which you were walking. This ...


2

I'm not saying I can back this up with strong direct evidence, but doing things in any order other than Primary heavy compound core lifts Accessory work ...feels insane and wrong to me. So yes, I feel there's a convention, and that is to put the important stuff first (after a general warm-up and specific warm-up, of course) and the accessory stuff after. ...


2

All in all, I'd say it doesn't matter too much, as long as you get them done. If you place them before your compound movements, they will provide a good warmup so that when you jump into the squat rack, you're properly warmed up, and there is less risk of injury. However if you went hard on the accessories, you might have to sacrifice some plates. That's ...


2

Is there a sensible way to separate the leg exercises onto two days? Why not: push, legs-1, off, pull, legs-2, off, off. Push: bench press, incline press, lat raise, triceps Pull: pull-ups, rows, rear delt raise, biceps Legs-1: squat, leg curl, standing calves Legs-2: stiff leg deadlift, leg press, seated calves This splits your leg day into two days ...


1

My short-term goal is to lose fat, I am currently a 235lbs bag of lard (well, there is still some muscle there). And my long-term goal is to be strong while looking good doing it. This is a great start -- good job on getting back at it. Just remember, abs are made in the kitchen, not the gym! The number of accessory workouts completed is not as important as ...


1

Your question is based on numbers and sets, but no mention of techniques. I'm going to attempt to address the question from a techniques stance. The pull-up is in itself a little of a misnomer for beginners. To effect a pull up, you don't just "pull" but rather engage your entire lats, traps, teres, momentatry biceps, and for a lesser extent, chest for ...


1

Hello it's Randomusersquat1232342345 again. I logged out before creating an account so i'll reply from this comment. First and foremost if you are unable to safely squat to parallel then do not squat to parallel. Squat as low as you can comfortably and safely go. As your mobility gets better then you can squat lower until hopeuflly you get mobile enough to ...


1

It sounds like you already had some good progress. Hitting a milestone like that 135 lb bench is a real validation of the work you've put in. You have two questions, but one of them I think you have more concerns with. Relative Strength The concept of equating the effort that a 150 lb young man does with a 230 lb man does is actually a fairly complicated ...


1

If you already are strong and have all the muscle mass you need then you can probably train only in the 1-5 rep range and become even stronger without increasing weight. However keep in mind that skeletal muscle mass is only a fraction of your weight. Also a lot of this muscle mass is in your legs, especially if you are not used to strength training. So ...


1

To understand the problem, let’s look at two extremes. Suppose that Person A does 100 Pushups in 100 Seconds while Person B does 100 Pushups in 100 Hours. If we assume that both persons are equally fit, then we can conclude that Person B isn’t even being challenged. Why? Because a single pushup every hour is hardly enough to sufficiently challenge this ...


1

I was posting a brief comment and as I submit I realised it had become longer and maybe I might as well post as answer. From what I've read from various sources including Pavel, working at 50% of ones max capacity and not to failure is best for growth, recovery & repeated stimulus/ training. We don't know if 100 is your max to failure. But let's say ...


1

Jeff Cavalier over on YouTube focuses on doing exactly that. He has a plethora of free videos that may be found there, and he also has a variety of programs which may be purchased on his website. He’s got a background as a physical therapist and believes in training the body both athletically and functionally. Check him out and see if that’s what you are ...


1

If you frequently change the way you train, it becomes very hard to follow if you are improving on them. The most important thing in weight training is "progressive overload". This must be followed, there must be an increase in the "total volume load" you are doing. (TVL = weight x rep x set) Therefore, try to stick to a single program; and try to milk it ...


1

What are your goals with crossfit? Compete in the open? Attain better fitness? Lift more? Lose/gain weight/strength? Many crossfitters complain about the lack of balance in workout plans, so you may find that the best course of action is to create your own plan based on the style of crossfit. This is not recommended for beginners, because this may lead ...


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