13

There is so much disinformation ("bro-science") in the answers and comments. I will start with answering the question: Yes, a protein shake once a day as meal replacement is completely safe. This shouldn't worry you. Do you need the extra protein? Probably not, unless you actually do resistance training (and for long term health you should) it will do very ...


8

Some quick research returned the following articles: Who Knew Preventing Kidney Stones Was this Easy? "In the 1990s when the Atkins diet reached huge popularity, critics claimed that high protein intake leads to kidney stones. This turned out to be a complete myth, but the misinformation is still being circulated. Although protein restricted diets are ...


8

Let's start with some foundation in the order of importance: Energy Balance (Calories in vs. Calories out) Macros (amount of protein, carbohydrates, fat) Micros/Supplements (vitamins / minerals and sports supplements) Meal timing (how often you eat and how close to training) Energy Balance This is the simplest thing: You eat less than you burn in a day ...


7

About the program We don't know your size and shape, so we're in no position to second-guess your instructor. For now, go with what he says. About the diet Protein powder is something we use when our regular diet doesn't offer enough protein. It's a supplement, nothing more. It doesn't replace anything, it just adds. You are right! In most cases, you ...


6

No this is not healthy or sufficient. At 100kg/220lbs, 196cm/6ft5in, 26 y/o male, your caloric intake is pretty low. At those numbers, I would expect your maintenance level to be ~2600 calories (guestimate). If you're going to the gym, which I assume you are since you said 'Dinner (Post workout meal)', this will be even higher. Even estimating high, your ...


5

Whey protein is used to gain muscle mass fast. Its a supplement and has very little side effects. The Brand is important because some people see more improvement with diffirent brands(needs to be verified). But ON is the leading provider by far, having the most reputation among bodybuilders. How much: There is no universal answer to this particular ...


5

Yes, whey protein can be helpful for elderly people also. The Journal of The American College of Nutrition, JACN, reports that the elderly have greater protein requirements than younger adults. Given that your mother is exercising, ingesting whey protein (or other biologic sources of protein), especially immediately following exercise, may well help her ...


5

Why does it matter how long protein digestion takes? is it because we do not want it to be released faster than body can absorb or needs? From https://redd.it/39xveo (mirror): Article (2014) (mirror): Protein Ingestion Prior to Sleep tl,dr: "[...]the post-exercise increase in muscle protein synthesis rate is not maintained during subsequent overnight ...


5

First of all, this all depends on the protein he is taking and some other life style aspects. My initial answer is that this is not a problem because supplements are simply meant to supplement your diet. getting 30 grams of protein from a shake isn't really different than getting 30 grams of protein from chicken or any other source of protein for that ...


5

Whey protein and casein are actually by-products of making cheese. They are separated during the cheese making process. Cheese manufacturers will sell this excess whey to supplements companies who then turn around and process it further. They remove the remaining fats, lactose, dry it, and then flavor it. There are three types of whey that are mostly how ...


5

Your body will extract the water just fine. Water intake recommendations have varied wildly over the years with very little real evidence to back it up. The common recommendations was 8 cups or 2 litres of straight water a day. Some recent studies suggest that you should drink water if you're thirsty, but beyond that it doesn't matter. There has never been ...


4

@muffin, the responses from Dan Andrews and backinshapebuddy are the most important things to continue. From personal experience, the signs of kidney damage really are that subtle that you'll think you are healthy until your kidneys have finally had enough. Also, the foods you eat most likely have more than adequate protein. I was active, ate relatively ...


3

1, 2: "Electrolytes" is just a fancier word for salts, which you will get in large amounts through your diet, especially if you eat a typical western diet. Unless you're exercising for two hours or more, the only one who's benefiting from your electrolyte drink consumption are the companies who sell them. 3,4: Total amount and distribution throughout the ...


3

The choice of whether to use protein shakes, how much, and how often is primarily a nutrition question. Strength training does increase your need for protein, however there are several recommendations that are simply overkill. I recommend reading a good primer on protein requirements called "The Three Laws of Protein"--which is designed for people who lift....


3

I've been using protein shakes for a few years, not daily but perhaps 3 times a week after heavy weight training (as opposed to after cardio, for example). I was told by a personal trainer many years back that people do damage their kidneys because they use excessive amounts. He said it's usually those entering competitions that have the mindset of "if HE is ...


3

Qualified personal trainer here. Post-training, your body has depleted its glycogen stores. In order to replenish them, it must utilise a macronutrient; carbohydrates, proteins, and fats (absorbed in that order). Your body's metabolism receives a serious boost after intense weight-training, so macronutrients are absorbed as an accelerated level. Since the ...


3

1. How much protein do I need overall in order to gain mass/muscle in my butt? A pretty good rule of thumb that's used in fitness circles is 1g of protein per lb of bodyweight each day, though various newer studies have shown 0.7g per lb to be just as effective. In your case, 80g of protein would be a good target, with 90g to 113g being ample. As for ...


2

I don't understand why all the answers saying timing doesn't matter are being downvoted. There is no link between time of protein ingestion in relation to working out that has any substantial effect. Please see this paper.


2

It is definitely not bad for someone to drink a protein shake without working out. It is very similar to eating a chicken breast that has 35 grams of protein in it. 35 grams of protein is 35 grams of protein, no matter where you get it from. Some proteins are different, such as casein (slow release) and whey (quick release), but it is still protein. As ...


2

I am a doctor, I have studied different causes of renal failure but supplement proteins were not amongs them I have used different protein supplement for the past couple of years and I am not concerned abou it. But if sombdy who already have a kidney problem should avoid it bcs it may aggravate their problem. Keep drinking keep drinking keep drinking plenty ...


2

I felt the same way when I started to drink protein. I wasn't sure if it was safe or effective to use these supplements. I actually consulted my doctor regarding them and she said that used in moderation there is no health risk for them unless you are allergic to the ingredients. That was about a year and a half ago, and now every time I finish a workout I ...


2

Is it a good idea to make shakes using egg white powder? I can imagine that adding water will reconstitute it into its original, slimy form. Will it cause stomach troubles? I've never tried raw eggs before. Egg whites also go by the name albumen, by which the fatty yolks have been filtered away. Most people who use egg protein powder are like you: they ...


2

Your protein needs, and basically everything you eat, should fit into your dietary goals. Those goals generally revolve around your total daily calories and your macro nutrient percentages (aka: macros). Start with one of the many calculators available on the Internet. For a couple of weeks, religiously track everything you eat, using one of the typical ...


2

Is there not a simple rule that "if you burn more calories than you take in...?" The answer if "Yes, but...". The body gets accustomed to a state of calories deficit and enters a more "efficient" mode where it uses less calories to survive, in addition to muscle mass loss which results in less energy required for weight maintenance. Few tips: Have a ...


2

Eating more calories than you need (known as a eating a surplus/bulk) will cause you to put on weight. Weight gain is really as simple as calories in vs calories out. In terms of planning how much protein you should be eating studies are divided but around 1g per 1lb body weight seems to be the middle ground. Note: Resulting body composition (fat/muscle ...


2

Your daily protein intake is very high and very good already.I don't think you need to add another protein shake as you are right now and probably not in the near future as well. Regarding the problems you mentioned it is a a problems that varies from person to person.I personally don't have any digestion problems no matter how many shakes i take but again ...


2

I would recommend this article from Barbell Medicine, so you can decide for yourself while shopping for supplements. It is written by MD/coach/powerlifter and based on science and available data. Some quotes: You'll need to eat more plant-based protein (if for regular diets people recommend 1g/1lb of body weight, you might need 1.5g/1lb) As the quality ...


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