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37

First, it must be noted that the quantity of protein that is being recommended by the calculator you have found is not supported by science. The literature suggests that optimal recovery occurs with a maximum of about 2 grams per kilogram of (lean) body mass per day (g/kg/d), with most of the world's institutes of sport, for example, recommending between 1.5 ...


11

You are not an ectomorph. There is no such thing as an ectomorph, as the concept of somatotypes is a nonsense pseudoscience that was made up in the 1940s and has never been supported by evidence. What you are, at 5'7" and 55kg, is very skinny. If you eat more without exercising, you'll get fat, and if you eat more and add a sufficient intensity and volume ...


11

50 grams of protein is the minimum amount of protein your body needs to not be deficient. These shouldn't be the goals you shoot for. 100 grams is more an appropriate amount to stay healthy. 30g of protein per meal and a snack or two will get you there. A cup of milk can be 8-13g alone, so really as long as you eat cheese, small amounts of meat, eggs, and ...


10

Divide your dose. Have some before and some after your workout. Unlike fat and carbohydrates your body can't store protein. If it doesn't get absorbed it gets passed through your digestive tract, your liver, your kidneys, etc. This not only wastes protein/ supplements and money it also taxes your machine by forcing it to process something that it can't ...


10

184g of Protein does not sound unreasonable to me for someone who is actively exercising. It can be a lot, but it only amounts to ~740 Cal of your daily consumption. So you will need to be eating more than that overall. First, I would check your math. Most lean meat has about 25g / 4oz serving--or as much space on your plate as a closed fist. A chicken ...


10

The cheapest way would be to see if there are any other added amino acids other than protein that aren't listed on the label. Companies will add cheap amino acids to increase the nitrogen balance in the powder which is what is needed to fool tests. If you look at the ingredients list and see taurine, glycine, arginine, glutamine, creatine, etc. then it is ...


10

In my experience smart scales (and in some other people's experiences) are not really trustworthy, especially in the absolute values they give, but can usually be trusted seeing trends, or how values change over time. What's usually measured is fat and water through a small dose of electricity, not "protein" directly. This scale might be doing some ...


9

Having a protein before your workout will allow you to have more energy, resulting in your workouts feeling stronger, but you will not burn as much fat when you workout. After your workouts, it is commonly accepted that your body acts like a sponge for about an hour while your muscles attempt to collect nutrients to repair what was torn down during the ...


8

Some quick research returned the following articles: Who Knew Preventing Kidney Stones Was this Easy? "In the 1990s when the Atkins diet reached huge popularity, critics claimed that high protein intake leads to kidney stones. This turned out to be a complete myth, but the misinformation is still being circulated. Although protein restricted diets are ...


8

Let's start with some foundation in the order of importance: Energy Balance (Calories in vs. Calories out) Macros (amount of protein, carbohydrates, fat) Micros/Supplements (vitamins / minerals and sports supplements) Meal timing (how often you eat and how close to training) Energy Balance This is the simplest thing: You eat less than you burn in a day ...


8

A typical 10lb bag of ON whey protein costs ~$115 USD. There are 149 servings (1 scoop = 1 serving) in a bag. So 24 grams of protein (with negligible carbs and fat) costs $0.77 USD. I don't think you'll find anything cheaper anywhere. And if you do, let me know.


8

Yes you need lots of other things, minerals, vitamins, essential fats, carbohydrates. These are needed to build muscle and also to stay alive, while the muscle building happens. That's why should keep a proper healthy diet, and with healthy I mean what's very commonly healthy: veggies, fruits, whole grain, then you can add additional protein to your diet.


8

I have no option beside protein powders. Just, because I cannot eat more than [a piece of chicken, 2 eggs, and a serving fish per day]. Yeah, right. There's no reason not to eat six eggs, double the chicken, and an extra serving of fish except you don't want to put in the effort. Two eggs? Two eggs is how many you eat when you're trying to lose weight! Get ...


7

To answer your question specifically: it doesn't matter. Studies show that the average amount of protein taken in over a given period of time(days, weeks)is what matters far more than getting your whey in before or after. The body does not really become magically more efficient at using protein after a workout. As long as you're hitting your daily intake ...


7

There are already some answers that address this, basically tissue is being torn down and needs to be repaired. But it goes further: there are simply a pile of benefits to upping protein (2012 study): Protein seems to play an important role in the emergence of [feeling full]. Long-term ingestion of a high-protein diet not only decreases food intake ...


7

Yes, the academic literature supports the notion that greater protein intake facilitates more rapid recovery, and can therefore sustain a greater training workload. And guidelines from all of the major sporting and dietary authorities around the world, which are remarkably consistent, reflect that fact. Evidence supports an intake of 0.5 to 0.8 grams of ...


6

I've been lifting for years. As a 46 year old 135lb female I was just taking in about 80 grams a day roughly. I did one 32 gram shake after my workout and then just ate whatever. I notice a plateau in my gains and getting weak shortly into my lifts so I added quite abit more protein, I'm up to my body weight in grams and it does seem to be helping already ...


6

Eggs! A dozen in USA costs around $3 that is 6 grams of proteins for $0.041 per gram. Although it doesn't beat $0.03 per gram in Eric's answer but its close and eggs are not for $3 everywhere. Knowing which country you belong to, this price can be significantly lower. I am from Canada. I just bought a dozen eggs for $2.64 Wohoo, that makes it $0.03 ...


6

Your primary nutrition should be from food. Protein powder as the name suggest are supplements, if you are using them as food, it may come up with side-effects. Regarding your coach, it's time to get a new one. You are a beginner, and with proper diet, nutrition, rest and workout, you can see benefits, not just by pumping yourself with protein powder. It's ...


6

There is a concept called the "anabolic window", which is a belief that directly after a workout our body is primed for optimal muscle protein synthesis (muscle growth) and that this period lasts only a short while, with anything after that far less effective. When I say a short while, I mean on the scale of half an hour or so. There is however no sufficient ...


6

The FDA recommendations are a very general guide and refer to the general population, not athletes or anyone doing large amounts of exercise. The IAAF have recently released some updated nutritional guidelines, the recommendations regarding protein intake are given below, note point 4 in particular: The optimum daily protein intake for weight stable ...


5

Years later but for anyone who reads this. Moesef's answer is half correct but completely misleading. Why would the breakdown of protein reduce it's effectiveness? You can buy them pre mixed off the shelf, they've been sitting there way longer than a few hours. Any breakdown of the protein will just turn them into amino acids, and like moesef said that isn'...


5

Why does it matter how long protein digestion takes? is it because we do not want it to be released faster than body can absorb or needs? From https://redd.it/39xveo (mirror): Article (2014) (mirror): Protein Ingestion Prior to Sleep tl,dr: "[...]the post-exercise increase in muscle protein synthesis rate is not maintained during subsequent overnight ...


5

First of all, this all depends on the protein he is taking and some other life style aspects. My initial answer is that this is not a problem because supplements are simply meant to supplement your diet. getting 30 grams of protein from a shake isn't really different than getting 30 grams of protein from chicken or any other source of protein for that ...


5

Well, you've kind of asked the million dollar question, as there haven't been any really definitive studies (That I am aware of) specifying exactly how much protein is needed for training, and especially when related to fat loss, as that can be highly individual specific. This study examined nitrogen balance and lean body mass preservation related to ...


5

Whey protein is used to gain muscle mass fast. Its a supplement and has very little side effects. The Brand is important because some people see more improvement with diffirent brands(needs to be verified). But ON is the leading provider by far, having the most reputation among bodybuilders. How much: There is no universal answer to this particular ...


5

A huge reality you need to embrace is that if you do not make sizable time and adjustments for your health now, you will make time and adjustments for long term and generally incurable health problems in the future. You might be "busy" now with life commitments, but being on a kidney dialysis machine will make you even "busier". This isn't about having a ...


5

No, protein supplements are made of whey protein, which is the liquid remaining after milk has been curdled and strained. It's not a synthetic product of any kind. I haven't tried the Gold brand in particular, but I can see that it's being sold by some of the most reputable sites (including here in Norway), so I see no reason doubt its quality. Your father ...


5

It's not like your protein intake on rest days is actually zero (unless you eat NOTHING on your rest days). I assume you are talking about a supplement source like whey protein. It is considered a good practice to consume almost the same amount of whey on rest days as you do on the days you workout. Building muscles is an easy but long process. Your muscles ...


5

Supplemented protein should ideally be only a small part of your total daily protein intake. There are sources of very good proteins (depending on your diet). Dairy (such as (lowfat) quark, cottage cheese and the like) Eggs Lean meat Soy Beans ... The ballpark is something around 2 grams of protein per kg bodyweight to gain muscles. Assuming a weight of ...


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