Hot answers tagged

16

You can gain muscle while losing weight, but really only in specific circumstances, which you most likely don't fall into. You need to be fairly obese to start with, and eating the correct nutrients to support the lifting that you are doing. However, you are most likely not in that category, since you have been training regularly already. If you are in a ...


15

There is a common saying that abs are made in the kitchen. Having a strong core and abdominal muscles is not enough to get "six-pack" or "washboard" abs, because there will likely be a large layer of fat over the abdominal region. In fact, you aren't able to really see six-pack abs until you are in the 8-15% range of Body Fat Percentage. Furthermore, the ...


12

Define waste. You may or may not gain weight, but there are other considerations at play. Excessive caloric intake will probably cause you to gain weight, plus there are other metabolic considerations from the reduction in exercise that may have an affect as well. When you have an excessive amount of protein intake, then you start placing a larger burden ...


10

Milk doesn't have a lot of protein. For example, whole milk is 49% fat, 30% carbs (sugar), and a measly 21% protein. If you want to increase the protein intake then you want to eat protein rich foods such as: Lean meats Protein powder Egg whites Fish/Seafood Soy Greek yogurt Here are some protein sources; note not all of them are high protein but they do ...


10

To best understand the answer to this, you have to understand that our bodies need Essential Amino Acids. In short any nutrient that is essential is one that your body cannot create on its own. There are a number of vitamins and minerals that fall in this category, but that is a topic for another question. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. ...


10

I recently stumbled on a great article that talks about protein consumption for the purposes of building muscle (recovery included). It's "The Myth of 1g/lb: Optimal Protein Intake for Bodybuilders". To make a long story short, there was a clinical study to determine how much protein was necessary to build muscle. It is still based on body weight, but the ...


10

Divide your dose. Have some before and some after your workout. Unlike fat and carbohydrates your body can't store protein. If it doesn't get absorbed it gets passed through your digestive tract, your liver, your kidneys, etc. This not only wastes protein/ supplements and money it also taxes your machine by forcing it to process something that it can't ...


9

First, most recommendations about frequency of eating and timing of eating don't have any appreciable real benefit. Whether you get all your daily nutrition in 3 meals or 6 only matters in what helps you stick to your nutrition plan. If you do better eating small meals throughout the day, do it. If you do better with multiple larger meals, go for it. ...


9

Having a protein before your workout will allow you to have more energy, resulting in your workouts feeling stronger, but you will not burn as much fat when you workout. After your workouts, it is commonly accepted that your body acts like a sponge for about an hour while your muscles attempt to collect nutrients to repair what was torn down during the ...


9

184g of Protein does not sound unreasonable to me for someone who is actively exercising. It can be a lot, but it only amounts to ~740 Cal of your daily consumption. So you will need to be eating more than that overall. First, I would check your math. Most lean meat has about 25g / 4oz serving--or as much space on your plate as a closed fist. A chicken ...


9

You are not an ectomorph. There is no such thing as an ectomorph, as the concept of somatotypes is a nonsense pseudoscience that was made up in the 1940s and has never been supported by evidence. What you are, at 5'7" and 55kg, is very skinny. If you eat more without exercising, you'll get fat, and if you eat more and add a sufficient intensity and volume ...


8

The answer depends on what your overall goals are, and what you are doing with your training. So, let's look at a couple of different people with different goals: Jack is a marathon runner. He runs for miles on end, and is into endurance. Jack needs to keep his electrolytes up, make sure he has carbs for energy. He still needs protein, but his muscles ...


8

.5g protein per pound weight is for sedentary individuals to maintain muscle mass. Losing muscle mass is not necessarily a fast process, but there are ill effects over time. If you are exercising, you will need more protein. I would increase your protein intake. It has a double advantage of being more satiating (allowing less room for junk food) and ...


8

For the most part this is speculation based on what I learned as from my college bio classes (which I took recently as a I just graduate as a bioengineer). Obviously, there are circumstances in which mixing your protein into a shake may cause it to lose effectiveness. For instance, a shake with high bacterial content, such as if you put yogurt or something ...


8

Let's start with some foundation in the order of importance: Energy Balance (Calories in vs. Calories out) Macros (amount of protein, carbohydrates, fat) Micros/Supplements (vitamins / minerals and sports supplements) Meal timing (how often you eat and how close to training) Energy Balance This is the simplest thing: You eat less than you burn in a day ...


7

Tinned tuna, mackeral and sardines. Not typically seen as a breakfast dish, but they are healthy and filling. Have protein and omega oils. Very convenient, just open and go. Depending where you are they often come with a range of different sauces. Do not eat at your desk at work.


7

Mechanical agitation can denature proteins, so that the proteins will no longer function correctly in their original state. But, it's likely the proteins are already denatured as a consequence of manufacturing. And, your digestive system will break down the proteins into amino acids anyway, in order to rebuild them into new proteins. Mechanical agitation (...


7

In order to get big, you need to eat a calorie surplus (more than you burn in a day). To get cut, you need to eat a caloric deficit. If you eat 200g+ protein but still eat fewer calories than you're burning, you're going to lose weight and you won't get huge and bulky. If you're trying to get cut, I'm assuming that you're trying to lose weight and/or lower ...


7

Yes, I don't see why not. Some protein shakes combine the two (or all three). Some samples: Hydro Builder (Protein + creatine) and Hydro Whey (Protein + BCAA) (mirror).


7

Some quick research returned the following articles: Who Knew Preventing Kidney Stones Was this Easy? "In the 1990s when the Atkins diet reached huge popularity, critics claimed that high protein intake leads to kidney stones. This turned out to be a complete myth, but the misinformation is still being circulated. Although protein restricted diets are ...


7

To answer your question specifically: it doesn't matter. Studies show that the average amount of protein taken in over a given period of time(days, weeks)is what matters far more than getting your whey in before or after. The body does not really become magically more efficient at using protein after a workout. As long as you're hitting your daily intake ...


7

A typical 10lb bag of ON whey protein costs ~$115 USD. There are 149 servings (1 scoop = 1 serving) in a bag. So 24 grams of protein (with negligible carbs and fat) costs $0.77 USD. I don't think you'll find anything cheaper anywhere. And if you do, let me know.


7

There are already some answers that address this, basically tissue is being torn down and needs to be repaired. But it goes further: there are simply a pile of benefits to upping protein (2012 study): Protein seems to play an important role in the emergence of [feeling full]. Long-term ingestion of a high-protein diet not only decreases food intake ...


6

Strength exercises, tending towards lower reps and higher weight, is (more or less) the only thing that will increase muscle mass, or at least maintain it (within limits). I'd consider 40% bodyfat past the point of being healthy, IIRC in the US 25-30%+ is considered obese*. If it were me, I'd focus quite a bit more on reducing that, rather than trying (...


6

Add powdered protein (whey, soy, whatever your preference) to your drink (almond milk is fine). Crack a few eggs in a pan and scramble them (takes <5 mins total). High protein cereal. Several types exist including one by Kashi More whole grains- Oatmeal works well for example. Don't add sugar to your meal or drink as sugar is an appetite stimulant


6

The real answer to your question is probably that the supposed superiority (for bodybuilding) of these types of protein sources has been determined by generations of bodybuilders using trial and error. I think, as the rest of this answer is intended to illustrate, that the number of variables in evaluating all differences between even a few different ...


6

I've checked the book I recommended in the comment. It is written by a PhD Robert K. Cooper and is entitled "Flip the switch". A simplification of what you could read there is as follows: We have limited storage space for excess protein, and the amino acids from them remain in the bloodstream for only about 4 hours. thats a good reason to include proteins ...


6

Eggs! A dozen in USA costs around $3 that is 6 grams of proteins for $0.041 per gram. Although it doesn't beat $0.03 per gram in Eric's answer but its close and eggs are not for $3 everywhere. Knowing which country you belong to, this price can be significantly lower. I am from Canada. I just bought a dozen eggs for $2.64 Wohoo, that makes it $0.03 ...


6

Your primary nutrition should be from food. Protein powder as the name suggest are supplements, if you are using them as food, it may come up with side-effects. Regarding your coach, it's time to get a new one. You are a beginner, and with proper diet, nutrition, rest and workout, you can see benefits, not just by pumping yourself with protein powder. It's ...


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