Hot answers tagged

15

I think you've heard the right idea, but you're misinterpreting it. Of course high reps builds some strength, but certainly not a whole lot. It's going to take a lot more effort (in terms of joules spent) to increase your 5RM by doing 15-rep sets, than it would to increase it by actually doing 5-rep sets. Don't think of it as "it does, or it doesn't". Most ...


10

It's a deadlift, meaning the weight should be dead on the floor. Touch-and-go or otherwise bouncing around is not a deadlift. Personally, I relax my grip and reset on every rep. My hands don't come off the bar, but I open my fingers, ensuring that the weight is indeed dead on the floor. The extra second this adds to each set is negligible and the benefit ...


9

Why Do Abs Exercises Have So Many Reps? Short Answer: To feel "The Burn" Many people erroneously feel that most abs exercises are cardio exercises. As a result, they try to perform as many reps in as short a time frame as possible. First, because the abdominal muscles perform many functions,they're capable of being stressed longer than most muscles. As a ...


7

With the deadlift (and other lifts that begin with the bar at a dead stop on the floor, such as the Olympic lifts), then taking a second or two between reps is usual, and arguably safer than doing the reps touch-and-go style (where you pretty much "bounce" the bar off the floor). The main reason, again, pertaining to deadlifts mainly, is to allow you to ...


7

The number of sets you do increases what we call the total volume of work being done. The more volume of work you do, the stronger signal your body gets that it needs to grow. If you do only one set, you aren't giving your body a very strong signal to grow. If the set is heavier than last time (even if you push it to failure), you give a slightly stronger ...


5

My current bench press 1-RM is close to 170 lbs. Is it possible to bring my 1-RM to around 225 lbs in just six weeks? As with everything, the answer is somewhere between "yes" and "no", or, as I like to constantly put it (stealing from Dan John), it depends. If you're a 110lbs female who's been benching for years, then I'd say no. If you're a 220lbs guy ...


4

There is generally no consensus about anything. We all have different bodies. We all react differently to different stimuli. That said, 60 reps of anything is a stamina exercise, and not a strength exercise. And your friends who did hundreds, weren't developing strength. They were developing further the ability to do hundreds of reps. The best advice we ...


4

First, let me correct your understanding of hypertrophy: You get bigger by more fatigue inducing reps (see this article for more info) There's nothing inspired or sacred about rep ranges or even set targets. They are just tools (see this article for more info) Second, you need to understand the concept of fatigue. The articles I linked to above are ...


4

John's answer is correct - all in all, it's hypertrophy (TUT) vs strength (rest). I just wanna add that it's a matter of how long the stoppage lasts, and not the reason that made you stop (as long as you're remaining in the starting position). e.g. resetting your grip is equal to stopping for a breath. There is no definition for how long the bar should lay ...


4

Anything that allows you to put in more overall fatigue inducing volume will be good. If you can do the first set at 12 reps, you have a few options: Do 3 sets at whatever you can get, and focus on building up even one more rep each time you do the exercise until you have the full set/reps Reduce weight for each set and use the last set to get as many as ...


4

How to Deadlift with Proper Form: The Definitive Guide Proper Deadlift form starts with the weight on the floor. Pull the bar until you’ve locked your hips and knees. Return it to the floor by moving your hips back first and then bending your knees. Rest a second between reps and repeat. Do five reps total on the StrongLifts 5×5 program. Read more:...


4

Indeed, the answer is no. To be strong, you need to lift heavy weights, there is no way around that. You will never get strong if you limit yourself to light weights with high reps : that will just build up your endurance. For instance, marathon runners have a lot of endurance, but cannot compete with 100m athletes (which have a lot more power). In order ...


4

Exercise form is something that seems to be invariably related to Range of Motion (ROM). Although they are two separate concepts, they tend to be mentioned together since form usually affects ROM. Intuitively, one would expect that “bad form” (ie. Sloppy) can lead to injuries since the movement tends to be fast, not controlled, and, the movements jerky. I,...


3

The biggest problem I see with this approach is that you spend a lot of time in opposite ends of the volume spectrum. Look at total reps over time: 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 That's eight workouts in a row of fairly high volume, followed by a dropoff to extremely low volume that's sustained for two workouts. Depending on the number of workouts ...


3

so 108 sun salutations.One Suryanamaskar contains 12 asanas that complete one cycle, so one cycle per each leg (Right & left) complete one round. So 54 sets of this round will give 108 Sun salutations. Good luck.


3

How you organize your sets determines what you get out of them. Each exercise on its own: 5x5 curl, 5x5 press, 5x5 squat. Wait between sets. This is the most strength-oriented of the options. It will involve some hypertrophy and some token conditioning. Note, however, that squatting the same weight that you press and curl will not challenge your legs or ...


3

I'll start with the overall theory. Greg Nuckols wrote an excellent article on increasing work capacity, which is at the core of getting stronger. It provides a great framework to understand everything else. Option 1: Same weight, but increase reps. This is essentially how the Doug Hepburn training routines are designed. Another example of programs in ...


3

Yes, depending on your goals Resetting your grip likely takes a bit of time, perhaps a few seconds, perhaps 10 or more. During this time, your hamstrings are (mostly) resting. This changes the results of the exercise somewhat. From a hypertrophy standpoint, the more you are 'resting' between reps, the more you're losing a bit of Time-Under-Tension, which ...


3

Minor story detour before my answer. I am 5ft5, 80kg, and I work out regularly and have respectable lifting ability compared to the average joe. My friend is 80kg, 6ft and cannot lift their bodyweight in any lift. We did some archery last week, after half a hour I look over and my friend is struggling a lot to keep his shoulders level, chest flat, arms ...


3

It sounds like you are looking for something along the lines of German Volume Training which has you working in 10x10, starting at 60% of your 1RM. Most GVT is linear in progression and so you miss out on the potential benefits of doing periodization. Personally, based on your current level of lifting you would probably benefit from reading up on some of ...


3

The fallacy of "counting repetitions" in isometrics I would caution against using Prilepin's chart when it comes to measuring isometrics. The reason for this is something you already put very nicely. A "repetition" implies range of motion, and an isometric exercise has no range of motion. In fact, it has no motion at all. Another approach I would instead ...


2

3 times a week. M/W/F 7 sets of 15 max. After 6 weeks or when able to complete, change to wide, then after that, change to narrow. After that start using step or stair 1. Up to 3 steps. When you use 50 percent of you bw you do 15 reps. When you use 100 percent, such as pullups or dips, you do 7 reps. 15 sets of 7, but only 1 or 2 times per week. Kinda ...


2

Instead of doing a single set 5/7 times a day, I would try doing 2 or 3 sets in a row, with 1 to 2 minutes rest, 2/3 times a day. The second or third sets should feel a lot harder. Note that, It's not clear what your goal is in your question.


2

Don't try to apply a mathematics approach to your training. What you are doing now is over training your body because you workout everyday. What that website suggested is better because by training 3 days per week your body will be able to recover on the other 4 and build strength. In your case there is no recovery time. However what I encourage you to try ...


2

Be careful about listening to self confessed YouTube 'guru's like the hodge twins. They aren't intellectuals and whilst mean well, they often have blaring holes in their understanding. They are ok for entertainment value but I personally wouldn't follow anything they said. They have decent physiques, but there is no way to know if they just have good ...


2

Generally the point of an exercise is to push your body to adapt to stress placed on it. You want each workout to push your body a little bit more than last time so your body gradually adapts towards where you want it to go. How you push it is down to your goals. If you want to be able to do lots of push ups, you will want to always try to do more push ups ...


2

Number of Reps for a Novice As noted in my answer to your original question, I think sets of 5 or so are fine for a novice such as yourself. That is close enough to the strength end of the rep range spectrum, but is high enough to trigger some muscle growth (hypertrophy) in addition to the neurological improvements. Later, you can decide whether to switch ...


2

Short answer: 8-12 reps, whichever your goal may be (strength, mass, speed, etc). Long answer: This has actually been rather well studied in science. 8-12 reps is the ideal range for a beginner, no matter what your goal is. You can see a (rather lengthy) post I wrote about this here, or just go to my source, the 2009 position stand by the American College ...


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