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12

I cannot provide a link to an official analysis of the training/instruction program of an elite military facility. What I can do is tell you of my own personal experience with it. You mentioned the lack of regeneration and rest, and you are absolutely right. The idea behind the selection process is to completely maim you psychologically and put you to the ...


12

Overview Your supplements are called copious sleep, hydration (with milk if it's part of your diet, water if not), and food. You know--eggs, vegetables, olive oil, meat, butter, greens, starches. Olympic lifting coach Greg Everett recommends walking, massage, self-myofascial release, and hot baths on rest days as well. Beyond those, supplements are good ...


10

If you're goal is strength than in between sets you should rest. Catch your breath. Have some water. Nibble on some sort of calories. Load more weight on the bar. Then go again. Not sure why you're waiting 3 to 5 minutes between sets as a beginner unless its training with partner / partners that are going in that time. In which case help them load their ...


9

You do have the right basic concept that low weight exercises can help build smaller muscles. However, it does require a better understanding of kinesiology (exercise science) to know which small muscles need help, how often, and when. For example, lifters who focus on bench press and rows will have the major muscle groups exercised. However, the rotator ...


8

First, a bit about physiology. Just like some people have big feet and some people have small feet, some people have big hearts and some people have small hearts. Those that have smaller hearts have higher heart rates in general; their resting rates won't be as low and their maximum rates may be higher. That's just natural variability. It's also generally ...


8

You are correct to be suspicious of the "one muscle a day" prescription. While that method works fine, it is perfectly possible and very productive to do whole-body exercises every time you work out. Many Olympic weightlifters do what's called Bulgarian training, which is training five or more days a week, sometimes several times a day. They use whole-body ...


8

Without knowing your goals, your training plan, the time you spend in the gym, the workload you put in the gym, it's going to be difficult to prescribe anything that will 100% work. However, there are a few principles you can go by: Set both short term and long term goals and work to beat them. Well rounded programs include strength, hypertrophy, ...


8

If you're overtraining or near overtraining, taking a rest week (or two, or three) often results in a performance increase. Since you've had issues with overtraining before, this may be the situation. Taking time off is not helpful in all situations but it can work. Many workout programs (for instance, 5/3/1) recommend a 'deload week' or a complete rest ...


7

It's not always necessary to focus so diligently on "out-of-the-way" muscles, but for many athletes with prior injuries or non-athletes it is. More important than exercises like this is programming a lifting regimen that is well-balanced. Pushes like the bench press should be balanced with pulls like rows or pull-ups, squats should be complemented with ...


7

It really depends on what you are after. If you are running the Starting Strength program or some other beginner program, they take the stance of take as much rest as you need--even 10 minutes between sets! The goal for those programs is to increase the weight on the bar as quickly as you can. Trade offs for Rest Times Longer rests provide more recovery ...


7

The difference between sleeping immediately after a workout and sleeping a half-workday later is negligible. The more significant difference, which is still pretty minor, is the increased energy many people feel earlier in the day. Generally speaking, most people are slightly stronger in early-day efforts than they are in late workouts. (Their mobility is ...


7

Relax. Sit, lie down, listen to music, talk to friends. If you're outside, enjoy the sun. If you really want to do something related to the training, visualize the exercise you are doing. Where do you get the idea, that you have to fill your time? Actually, if you fill your time between sets with random stuff, you lose mental focus on your training.


6

Are there disadvantages to longer rests between sets? Sure. I cool down if I wait longer than five or so minutes between heavy squat sets, and that can be a problem if my mobility is iffy and I really need to be warm to get good form. It's also annoying to have the two-hour-plus workouts that result from 10-minute rests between sets of, say, heavy squats ...


6

Typically, no. What I've been doing is getting through the warmups as quickly as I can without rushing. When I'm done with the warmup work, I allow myself a proper amount of rest before the first work set. How much rest you need really depends on you. If you have a head cold, or are running on too little sleep, you may need an extra few seconds after ...


6

5RM = 5 rep max. So, the heaviest weight that you can do 5 times, without re-racking the weight. If you could have done it 6 times, then it wasn't your 5RM. There are several calculators online that can estimate given your 1RM.


6

First, lower back exercises shouldn't be done ONLY on rest days. Of course, since you're already hitting your lower back with squats and deadlifts, it kinda makes the comment redundant; I just needed to point that out in case you switch programs. Second, core training can be done daily. Your core muscles are strong enough to recover quickly from applied ...


6

You're sore Wednesday because you squatted Monday. Soreness from lifting can easily last two or three days, and even get worse on later days. It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS. Since waking up this morning, my lower back is very sore. It is as if I did a heavy workout. I don't understand why this happened. This wasn't as sore yesterday. ...


6

My question is, what was likely the result of the second workout that day? Was it more likely to be beneficial, or harmful? You could have injured yourself, for starters. Following that first workout at 11am, you broke a lot of tissues down in your body and weakened yourself. With rest and recovery your body heals, plus a bit of size and strength to ...


6

What amount of training/rest/food you need to accomplish your goals, isn't the same for everyone. There's no one-size-fits-all plan that says "do these exercises, sleep x hours, and eat these exact foods", which will work for any and all. When we hear of athletes training every single day, it tells us this: They rest enough throughout the rest of the day (...


5

I want to preface all of this by saying that this is from memory so a lot of this is sort of foggy. First, yes, a lot of the Bulgarian lifters were apparently on performance enhancing drugs and I believe many of them were banned from any sort of Olympic Weightlifting. Secondly, the Bulgarian method is effective because it takes advantage of the body's ...


5

I've always found something like working on antagonistic muscle groups, stretching tight muscle groups or just plain tidying up the gym a bit usually keeps me entertained.


4

If I find myself wanting more time between warm-up sets than it takes to change the plates, I know something is wrong. Most likely I'm not recovered enough, indicating my program or eating or sleeping or stress is messed up. It's not a big problem, but it's something to note. I should be getting warm and mentally ready for my work sets, not getting tired. ...


4

One set per exercise is nowhere near the volume you're talking about in those scenarios. If you're a coal miner and you're lifting moderately heavy things all day, you're going to build strength in those muscles. Doing a single set of everything is going to result in very little strength gains. Not to mention that, barring any kind of warm ups which don't ...


4

We are training to produce adaptations, and through those adaptations we become more capable. There are a lot of different adaptations that happen as a result of training; for example, in aerobic training the heart's stroke volume increases and Haemoglobin levels in blood rise. In muscular training, muscle fibers get stronger. In the case of muscles, working ...


4

It is little bit complicated but let me explain it from heart rate, blood pressure and energy expenditure point of view. During sitting body consume less energy and HR and blood pressure will be lower. For your situation, the athletes will rest approximately 3-5 minutes (4th) which is good time period to save some energy and lower heart rate and blood ...


4

For our body muscles are cost centers in terms of energy efficiency. In other words if they are not needed - they are removed. If you are not training, there is no good reason to keep them, so they will be removed. It takes time, as building them takes time. For sure that process will go faster if you have negative caloric balance. However eating more ...


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