11

It sounds like you want to start incorporating muscle-ups and weighted pull-ups whenever possible. I don't think kipping pull-ups are really appropriate for a number of reasons, but if they float your boat (and you have a healthy, strong, flexible shoulder girdle), rock 'em. Upper-Body Pulling Power Power is not a common goal for upper body pulls, though ...


9

Yes. You definitely need climbing specific shoes (either your own or borrowed/ rented). They won't slide around on your feet like other shoes and they provide edging stability that doesn't rely exclusively in the rigidity of your foot. While you may be able to climb very easy routes with regular shoes, if you were to try routes with smaller footholds you'll ...


8

Rock climbing is largely a skill sport, so to get better, climb more. Being generally fit also helps, but to be a better rock climber, you need to climb a lot. If you want to specifically do extra work for rock climbing you should start off with identifying your weaknesses. From my experience in my climbing gym, the biggest weaknesses are grip strength and ...


6

Honestly, just boulder more and the strength will come. A lot of the usual grip based exercises don't really have a good carry over into rock climbing / bouldering because of the nature of the holds you use. Something like crushing strength (the type of strength you use when you close a hand gripper or shake someone's hand) isn't much use when you're using ...


5

I had a period of serious shoe funk, and tried a number techniques before finding a system that works for me. It should be noted that shoe odor tends to be much worse in synthetic shoes. The most important thing is prevention. Do not put your shoes in a bag, ever. Even in an open canvas bag, the shoes don't dry out as well between sessions. I've taken to ...


5

I'd recommend you to get a pull up bar, as I think the pull up comes closest to real climbing. The models for the door frame are not that expensive. But it might be complicated to find the right door to make you still able to watch TV and I doubt you want to glue a ceiling mounted pull up bar to your living room. So without a pull up bar, try inverted rows ...


5

In order to improve your strength needed for climbing, you should focus on pulling patterns: inverted rows (horizontal pulling) are good, lay down under a table und pull yourself up. If this is too easy, place your feet onto a chair. pull ups (vertical pulling). They are my favourite pulling exercise, they just give you so much strength, work your biceps ...


5

This answer is about bouldering vs rock climbing in gyms. Outdoor variations may be different. Bouldering usually is more difficult and technical than rock climbing. The difficulty scales up much faster because climbs are quick and small. Plus you don't have to worry about harnesses. You just have to be brave enough to fall a few meters on a pad. Rock ...


4

A good way to increase your leg lifting height is to use ankle weights. Legs carry a massive proportion of your body weight (on the average person). Train the muscles involved in lifting your legs. By using a light ankle weight (around 1.5kg) and lifting your knee to its highest possible position. Rinse and repeat performing 10-12 repetitions on each leg. ...


4

Muscle "pump" is nothing more than increased blood flow into a muscle from exertion. If you have a higher pump sensation than usual, then I'd look at something else as the cause. More caffeine or salt than usual, dehydration, other factors that would contribute to this.


4

I'm super surprised no one has mentioned the major source of muscle imbalance in climbers: climbing is a pulling sport more than a pushing sport. This results in overdevelopment of upper-body pulling muscles (biceps and back) relative to pushing muscles (chest and triceps). I personally have a friend who climbs 5.14 and yet has terrible back pain that ...


4

Rent them until you can get your own. Evolve makes some fairly low priced shoes, at least much cheaper than the other mainstream brands. Unless you're naturally a good climber, 5.8'ish is going to be a ceiling for most people without proper shoes. It's hard to gain confidence and good technique without being able to practice good footwork.


4

There's a lot of good stuff in the other answers here. Pullups and rows are great. Grip training at home (with Rock Rings or grippers) is awesome. I'd also emphasize 2 other things: core work, and general fitness. Abs A strong core is what's going to let you control your legs, and drive power between you lower and upper body, especially on overhangs. ...


4

My susceptibility to neck strains decreased significantly after I started focusing on overhead mobility. For me that meant overhead presses, overhead squats, one-arm overhead pressing while in a squat, plus—and this is important—all the mobility work necessary to support those exercises. I suspect that other methods of increasing stability overhead would ...


4

Basically, it's just chalk, like you see gymnasts, weight lifters, rock climbers, etc., use. A fanny pack would be ok to hold it, but I imagine it would leak powder everywhere. They do make specialized bags, but you may have the same problem with chalk leaking everywhere when doing parkour. Here is a link to the REI page showing some of the chalks/bags ...


4

Start out like everyone else Obviously, you're not excused from working your entire body, because if you just train certain areas, you're messing up your body, so first things first, get a regular training program, and start from there. Rock climbing specific training The one area where rock climbers simply excel beyond anyone else, is the ratio between ...


4

What you're trying to do is, unfortunately, not that easily accomplished. Boundering grades are always a little subjective (depending on the climbers strengths / weaknesses, body mechanics, proportions, etc), so you may find that you struggle on a V8 whereas you fly up a V9. I remember reading an interesting article a while back that the best boulderers in ...


4

There was a study done along these lines in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research in 2010, where they did strength training for 3 months and then detraining for 3 months to measure the adaptations. The basics were that strength was measurably increased after 2 months, size didn't start changing until near the three month mark, and the tendons ...


3

Finger injuries from climbing often involve strains of the tendon and/or tendon pulley, inflamation, partial or full tears and/or joint ligament sprains. You would need to see a doctor for a diagnosis, preferably a hand specialist with experience treating climbers. If you need treatment, look for a specialized hand therapist (either a physical or ...


3

There are a lot of things you can do to increase the shelf life of your rock climbing shoes as well as reduce the odor/bacteria in it: Do not wear them except while climbing; the rubber grips at the bottom soak up the dirt and gravel, reducing their effectiveness and long-term durability. Replace the soles of the shoes on an as-needed basis. Use a damp rag ...


3

Seeing your routine, which is very solid, I've realized I do have some advice. There are two rough approaches I would take in your shoes. The first approach would be to cut the sets of 8 to sets of 3. Fewer reps per set still maintains or improves strength, without requiring the endurance of 8-rep sets. It also decreases the recovery load on your system. ...


3

Outdoor Gear Lab wrote a pretty good article on the subject here: http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Climbing-Shoe-Reviews/Buying-Advice Quoting from this article: If you are just starting out then you probably want a more comfortable, versatile, all-around shoe. Don't go for the aggressive down-turned shoes. Go for something that is not too tight and ...


3

It depends on the campus board setup. Nice setups often have: The campus boards on an over hang with wooden slats underneath for your feet. And various sets of grips. The easiest is very positive and the hardest probably has nothing to wrap your fingers around at all. The slats help you scale down the exercises so you don't have to do them legless. So you ...


3

"Building muscle" is a very broad term. Will your program allow you to build muscle? Yes. Will you look like a bodybuilder? Probably not. Calisthenics 1-2 times a week, assuming properly executed, has the ability to give you good results. Bouldering - that depends... From what I know (and guess), probably won't build big muscles, but will give you a very ...


3

The fallacy of "counting repetitions" in isometrics I would caution against using Prilepin's chart when it comes to measuring isometrics. The reason for this is something you already put very nicely. A "repetition" implies range of motion, and an isometric exercise has no range of motion. In fact, it has no motion at all. Another approach I would instead ...


3

Note: This answer pulls from a variety of sources, books, observations and personal experience and opinion, none of which are cited scientific studies I'm going to address this in two parts, how beginners tend to / should progress at climbing (from personal experience and observation) and tendon strength / training (mainly from books and a bit of personal ...


2

The only answer is comfortable shoes. It's quite possibly the only answer for a climber at any level, but certainly for beginners. You don't want shoes that will slip around, but most places will tell you to get them as tight as you can tolerate. That's way bogus. Get them comfortable. If as you progress they seem like they aren't tight enough, you'll ...


2

I think you're getting burned out because of the low carb diet. Your muscles need carbs to function and rebuild, and without much carbs your body will just break down muscle to supply you with energy. Strength training and high protein intake will counteract this to some degree, but cutting excess calories from fat would be the ideal method. Your likely ...


2

I agree with @Dean that "the most important thing is prevention" but my method is slightly different. Over my first 6 months of climbing ~2/wk indoors, my climbing shoes became unbearably (and embarrassingly) smelly, despite religiously air drying them after use. As OP mentioned, they were also visibly dirty on the inside. And it's worth noting that I never ...


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