9

Yes. You definitely need climbing specific shoes (either your own or borrowed/ rented). They won't slide around on your feet like other shoes and they provide edging stability that doesn't rely exclusively in the rigidity of your foot. While you may be able to climb very easy routes with regular shoes, if you were to try routes with smaller footholds you'll ...


7

Honestly, just boulder more and the strength will come. A lot of the usual grip based exercises don't really have a good carry over into rock climbing / bouldering because of the nature of the holds you use. Something like crushing strength (the type of strength you use when you close a hand gripper or shake someone's hand) isn't much use when you're using ...


6

This answer is about bouldering vs rock climbing in gyms. Outdoor variations may be different. Bouldering usually is more difficult and technical than rock climbing. The difficulty scales up much faster because climbs are quick and small. Plus you don't have to worry about harnesses. You just have to be brave enough to fall a few meters on a pad. Rock ...


4

I'm super surprised no one has mentioned the major source of muscle imbalance in climbers: climbing is a pulling sport more than a pushing sport. This results in overdevelopment of upper-body pulling muscles (biceps and back) relative to pushing muscles (chest and triceps). I personally have a friend who climbs 5.14 and yet has terrible back pain that ...


4

Rent them until you can get your own. Evolve makes some fairly low priced shoes, at least much cheaper than the other mainstream brands. Unless you're naturally a good climber, 5.8'ish is going to be a ceiling for most people without proper shoes. It's hard to gain confidence and good technique without being able to practice good footwork.


4

A good way to increase your leg lifting height is to use ankle weights. Legs carry a massive proportion of your body weight (on the average person). Train the muscles involved in lifting your legs. By using a light ankle weight (around 1.5kg) and lifting your knee to its highest possible position. Rinse and repeat performing 10-12 repetitions on each leg. ...


4

What you're trying to do is, unfortunately, not that easily accomplished. Boundering grades are always a little subjective (depending on the climbers strengths / weaknesses, body mechanics, proportions, etc), so you may find that you struggle on a V8 whereas you fly up a V9. I remember reading an interesting article a while back that the best boulderers in ...


4

Start out like everyone else Obviously, you're not excused from working your entire body, because if you just train certain areas, you're messing up your body, so first things first, get a regular training program, and start from there. Rock climbing specific training The one area where rock climbers simply excel beyond anyone else, is the ratio between ...


4

Basically, it's just chalk, like you see gymnasts, weight lifters, rock climbers, etc., use. A fanny pack would be ok to hold it, but I imagine it would leak powder everywhere. They do make specialized bags, but you may have the same problem with chalk leaking everywhere when doing parkour. Here is a link to the REI page showing some of the chalks/bags ...


4

My susceptibility to neck strains decreased significantly after I started focusing on overhead mobility. For me that meant overhead presses, overhead squats, one-arm overhead pressing while in a squat, plus—and this is important—all the mobility work necessary to support those exercises. I suspect that other methods of increasing stability overhead would ...


4

There was a study done along these lines in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research in 2010, where they did strength training for 3 months and then detraining for 3 months to measure the adaptations. The basics were that strength was measurably increased after 2 months, size didn't start changing until near the three month mark, and the tendons ...


3

"Building muscle" is a very broad term. Will your program allow you to build muscle? Yes. Will you look like a bodybuilder? Probably not. Calisthenics 1-2 times a week, assuming properly executed, has the ability to give you good results. Bouldering - that depends... From what I know (and guess), probably won't build big muscles, but will give you a very ...


3

It depends on the campus board setup. Nice setups often have: The campus boards on an over hang with wooden slats underneath for your feet. And various sets of grips. The easiest is very positive and the hardest probably has nothing to wrap your fingers around at all. The slats help you scale down the exercises so you don't have to do them legless. So you ...


3

Finger injuries from climbing often involve strains of the tendon and/or tendon pulley, inflamation, partial or full tears and/or joint ligament sprains. You would need to see a doctor for a diagnosis, preferably a hand specialist with experience treating climbers. If you need treatment, look for a specialized hand therapist (either a physical or ...


3

The fallacy of "counting repetitions" in isometrics I would caution against using Prilepin's chart when it comes to measuring isometrics. The reason for this is something you already put very nicely. A "repetition" implies range of motion, and an isometric exercise has no range of motion. In fact, it has no motion at all. Another approach I would instead ...


3

Note: This answer pulls from a variety of sources, books, observations and personal experience and opinion, none of which are cited scientific studies I'm going to address this in two parts, how beginners tend to / should progress at climbing (from personal experience and observation) and tendon strength / training (mainly from books and a bit of personal ...


2

In some quick googling around, the biggest issues I could find included: Hunched shoulders -- suggesting upper back or general posterior chain weakness Difficulty of spreading fingers -- the opposite of a grip problem, manifests itself as inflammation pain in the fingers. The hunched shoulders I think are the more common issue that plagues a number of ...


2

High stepping in rock climbing To high step, you need to lift your knee high, but also rotate your hip out and then possibly extend the high foot from that rotated position. This is going to require developing dynamic flexibility / mobility in your glutes, hip flexors, and hamstrings. This image illustrates a fairly advanced high-step: high step. What ...


2

A cheap and effective way is to put your hand in a bucket full of rice while making a fist. Once you have done that, open your hand. The deeper you put your hand in the bucket, the harder it will be. Alternatively, Metolius makes the Grip Saver which is a much more portable method and allows you to work both flexion and extension. This is what I use. ...


2

I think you're getting burned out because of the low carb diet. Your muscles need carbs to function and rebuild, and without much carbs your body will just break down muscle to supply you with energy. Strength training and high protein intake will counteract this to some degree, but cutting excess calories from fat would be the ideal method. Your likely ...


2

The reason running shoes are not great for rock climbing is because they tend to fit a little loose (since your foot swells when you run), they don't have hard soles, and to be durable enough for heavy road use, the rubber is not very sticky. Climbing shoes typically have sticky rubber, are form fitting, and have fairly rigid soles so you can stick to ...


2

Yes, but not as much as you'd get from standard weightlifting. How much all depends on how much muscle you have currently, and what your genetics (e.g. testosterone levels) are. If you DO pursue bouldering, be sure to spend some time doing 'pushing' exercises (push-ups, overhead-pressing, etc) to keep your shoulders balanced. Otherwise you might be at ...


2

Bouldering places a lot of strain on the ligaments and tendons of the arms and fingers, moreso than weight training alone. It becomes particularly evident when you realise that you're having to hold yourself in a static position on the wall, keeping your arms locked at particular angles instead of steadily working through the full range of motion. Yes, you ...


2

You could treat this similar to running and fuel every 40-60 minutes depending on the duration of your climb. 2 hours is the max I would normally running without a Gel or something so you could eat something halfway. You have the advantage of being able to digest a little more normally since your HR will be lower than a runner so you can look at other fuel ...


2

I don't have a lot of experience with this, but I remember seeing a video about grip strength that recommended training towel pullups, gripping less and less of the fabric over time to challenge your grip more and more. Starting by regular pullups holding a towel hanging from the bar with one hand, moving to a towel in each hand when you're comfortable, and ...


2

I don't have much experience with bouldering, it wasn't really a thing back then. But if you don't intend to compete, just do whatever you think is most fun.


2

I had tricep tendonitis (tendonosis in my case, to be more specific) for years and have only recently got over it. Whilst you're looking to prevent it in the first place, I imagine you could do the same as what I did to cure it. I found the best ways of treating it was with a combination of eccentric exercise and 'heavy slow resistance' training in order to ...


1

What you have described above is similar to what I do for my antagonist training for bouldering. I do recommend adding something like supermans, the ones where you lay on your stomach and lift your shoulders, head, arms, and feet off the ground, these will build the muscles that climbers neglect in the back. I would also recommend training the antagonist ...


1

I have been climbing and competing in this sport for a long time. I am not a mountaineer but I have done a lot of sport climbing in the past and have been primarily bouldering for the last 8 years. For hand strength I suggest being very cautious in how hard you push yourself in this regard. Always use open hands when doing training specific to finger ...


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