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I had tricep tendonitis (tendonosis in my case, to be more specific) for years and have only recently got over it. Whilst you're looking to prevent it in the first place, I imagine you could do the same as what I did to cure it. I found the best ways of treating it was with a combination of eccentric exercise and 'heavy slow resistance' training in order to ...


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In general you would want to focus on upper body strength exercises with an emphasis on precision since the movements involved in climbing require some level of precision. Also, mainly movements are unilateral so perhaps some form of unilateral training would be beneficial. After thinking about this a bit, I recalled a few things from another life that might ...


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"On the other hand there is this "trend"(?) started by the surgeon John Kirsch who argues that hanging completely relaxed for some time every day will fix most shoulder problems by moving your acromion into a better position over time." Never heard of this doctor but when I had shoulder pain from work it was instinctive...automatic for me ...


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The main difference is one of intent. Hanging with relaxed shoulders, the intent should be that of stretching, allowing your body to relax into the stretched position. Hanging with active shoulders, the intent should be strengthening the muscles of the shoulder, which will help with injury prevention. When you're doing fingerboard work, you're training your ...


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Are you sure that it's triceps tendonitis that you're experiencing? Medial epicondylitis ("golfer's elbow") is much more common among climbers, which makes sense, as this is where the origin of the finger flexor muscles attaches, whereas the triceps really don't get used much in climbing. If you hold your arm out in front of you, with elbow bent to ...


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