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11

Is it terrible and wrong? I'm willing to concede he knows a fair amount more about training than I do with his multiple years under the bar. Bill Starr is also a very reputable source. There are some subtleties that I think are worth calling out: Bill Starr recommend sets of 15-20 for rehab--which is consistent with all the rehab advice I've read. The ...


7

She doesn't know what she's talking about. The hips do not interface with any socket, rather they each contain a socket, so it makes no sense to try to describe the hips as moving relative to their own sockets. Furthermore, the femurs do not move out of the hip sockets except in the case of hip dislocation, which is a serious injury usually only occurring ...


7

What I've heard--and this is mere hearsay, I'm no medical professional--is that any attempt to use heavier weights (and thus lower rep ranges) with the small muscles of the shoulder is nigh-impossible, because the larger muscles, the prime movers, take over after a certain weight. Keeping the weight very low allows the stronger prime mover muscles to hang ...


6

The shoulder is an amazingly complex joint that allows for a very wide range of motion. The point of the rotator cuff is to keep the ball joint in the middle of the shoulder girdle. It is a stabilizing muscle, not a primary mover. I think it's a big mistake to treat rehab exercises like you would strength exercises. When a physical therapist prescribes ...


4

RTC Strengthening You may want to link to some of the programs you reference that “always work them with the lightest pink dumbbells and in the >15 rep range”. I suspect that the RTC exercises referenced are rehab exercises for RTC injuries. Injured tissue is exercised differently than normal healthy tissue and often specific muscles are worked in ...


4

I'm also not a medical professional. I had minor shoulder problems in my early 20's, and was put on rotator cuff exercises (plus a basic strengthening program). And it worked, and I did rotator cuff exercises fairly consistently (along with regular weight lifting and sports) for about 10 years. What I found when I tried to go any heavier than the lightest ...


3

Scapular Pull Ups Full Video Right to Demo I'd take a look at this just to clean up everything: 7 Dumbest Pull-Up Mistakes Sabotaging Your Back Growth! STOP DOING THESE! Last thing. I'm not sure how you're doing your weighted pull-ups (or dips for that matter) but holding a DB between your legs, especially if you're doing a weight over 45lbs IMO is the ...


3

I'm not a doctor and can't diagnose medical stuff, go see an actual doctor / physio, etc, etc, etc. Consider that a disclaimer, this is all my opinion. Have a look at your grip width. If you're trying to use a really narrow grip to keep upper back tightness, then it'll place a lot of stress on the shoulder structure you're talking about. If you have a ...


3

How have you done the chin-ups? Take care that you keep tension all the way during the repetition especially at the bottom of the exercise. Also if you go to wide you can injure your rotator cuff. Here is some good advice on chin/pull-ups: http://jasonferruggia.com/the-shocking-truth-about-chin-ups/ it simply says that the best way to do those exercises ...


3

It is a very bad idea. The main role of the rotator cuff muscles is positioning the center of the Humerus head in the precise place during each movement (avoiding the dreaded humeral head migration), so that the action of the "big" muscles (pecs, lat, deltoid heads) does not result in soft tissue impingement and the rotation takes place smoothly. By ...


3

Personally, unless you have a known deficiency or need to strengthen them for a specific reason, I would just let your normal training take care of them. They are ancillary muscles for most movements (Which means accessory or helping muscles), and their primary function is to stabilize/rotate the upper arm, mostly by keeping the head of the humerus in place ...


3

The teres minor muscle is part of the rotator cuff and it externally (laterally) rotates the shoulder. It does so in combination with the infraspinatus, so I'm not certain that you can fully isolate it. To Strengthen the external rotators together, you can do so with: Cables or resitance/thera-bands in a neutral position or in an elevated position Free ...


2

Please learn the difference between assistance work, accessory work, and rehab work. Cuban rotation is not a strength exercise, and therefore should not be done in order to improve strength. If you want shoulder strength, stick with strict presses. I don't remember seeing any Cuban rotations in Mark Rippetoe or Jim Wendler's work. You should start doing ...


2

I think that you need to consider whether or not the rotator cuff exercises before lifting are a light warm-up or performed to the point of fatigue. If the exercises fatigue the rotator cuff muscles, then as @Mephisto cautions, the humeral head will migrate superiorly especially with overhead exercise such as the shoulder press. This is an unwanted ...


2

I myself have become very interested in this area, based on my research I have discovered that Massachusetts General Hospital actually DO recommend doing warm up exercises under the heading Prevention of Injuries in Weight Training The source can be found here: http://www.massgeneral.org/ortho/services/sports/rehab/Strength%20Training%20for%20the%...


2

Do sternum pull ups on rings, when you are at the top portion you have to lift your legs up, straight like in a front lever then externally rotate your shoulders like in a pull apart or a "no money" exercise. If you find it too hard just use bands or get assistance from someone . Normal pull ups do nothing for your rotator cuff, as those muscles just give ...


2

Isolation training for your RO Cuff (in a non-rehab setting) is inefficient and unnecessary as it's already activated during more complex exercises. You're body moves as a unit and muscles never act in isolation. Your rotator-cuff should not be trained "alone" as it a critical dynamic stabilizer for the most unstable joint in your body, your shoulder. ...


2

I think that "warming up rotator cuff muscle before weight lifting and workout" is good.But if you work out a lot rotator cuffs then you are exhausting your rotator cuffs and rotator cuffs can't stabilize your shoulder.


2

As others have said, it would be a good idea to seek the advice of a physical therapist, in case it is more serious than you think. With that said, I have shoulder impingement in both of my shoulders and the pain and range of motion have vastly improved with the exercises and modifications I have listed below. I do these exercises on shoulder day once a ...


1

Shoulder Kinematics During Abduction There is so much going on at the shoulder during any type of overhead and rotational movement. The supraspinatus is a smaller GH stabilizing muscle that never works in isolation - so this may be one of many muscles you are feeling. The contracting muscles are dynamic related. With a line of pull (or force vector) ...


1

You need to focus on warming up your shoulders before any workout. For this grab a 5 lbs dumbbell (or lighter) vertically, maintain an angle of 90° between biceps and forearms and perform movements for Right hand towards RHS & for left hand towards LHS, perform 10-15 reps. Then raise your hands to shoulder height(maintaining 90° b/w biceps & forearms)...


1

No, there is a fundamental difference between the Pendlay row and the bent-over barbell row. Neither of which, if you execute proper form, put your shoulders in a position to impinge. The Pendlay Row has your torso, more or less, parallel with the ground and you pull the bar to your sternum (or just below) from the ground. You can pull a barbell to ...


1

You need to figure this out for yourself by looking at a picture. Each individual part of the shoulder joint is too small for that red dot to give any indication of what/where the problem is.


1

The rotator cuff is collection of four tendons and muscles. Most people don't target them until they've had some form of injury to the area. They are typically exercised using bands, towels, cables, stretches, and very light weights. If you've had previous problems with your rotator cuff, it's not a bad idea to warm up first. Make sure to perform any ...


1

First, there's no way for any of us to diagnose what's wrong. However, as someone who has had a surgical repair of the rotator cuff, I might be able to provide some insight into what you're experiencing. The rotator cuff is a somewhat complicated bundle of four muscles, tendons and ligaments, of which any one, can be injured. And, I don't think performing ...


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